Biogeography of the West Indies

As a review of the status of biogeography in the West Indies in the 1980s, the first edition of Biogeography of the West Indies: Past, Present, and Future provided a synthesis of our current knowledge of the systematics and distribution of ...

Biogeography of the West Indies

As a review of the status of biogeography in the West Indies in the 1980s, the first edition of Biogeography of the West Indies: Past, Present, and Future provided a synthesis of our current knowledge of the systematics and distribution of major plant and animal groups in the Caribbean basin. The totally new and revised Second Edition, Biogeography

Biogeography of the West Indies

Drawing together contributions from the leading experts in biogeography and biodiversity, this book introduces patterns and new developments that add to our understanding of how plants and animals are dispersed throughout the region.

Biogeography of the West Indies

As a review of the status of biogeography in the West Indies in the 1980s, the first edition of Biogeography of the West Indies: Past, Present, and Future provided a synthesis of our current knowledge of the systematics and distribution of major plant and animal groups in the Caribbean basin. The totally new and revised Second Edition, Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives, emphasizes recent ideas and hypotheses in the field and includes many new chapters and contributions. The authors use the broadest possible interpretations of the concepts of biogeography, consider anthropological and geological factors, and discuss the conservation of endemic species. Drawing together contributions from the leading experts in biogeography and biodiversity, this book introduces new patterns and developments that add to our understanding of how plants and animals are dispersed throughout the region. Many contributions use new techniques such as molecular systematics to test older studies based strictly on morphological data. Unique in its inclusion of a wide variety of organisms and in its coordination of scientific data and conservation strategies, Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives, Second Edition provides the only encyclopedic discussion available on the biogeography of the Antilles.

Biogeography of the West Indies

Evolution and biogeography of West Indian Sphaerodactylus (Sauria: Gekkonidae): a molecular approach. Journal of Zoology 225:525–561. Hass, C. A. and S. B. Hedges. 1991. Albumin evolution in West Indian frogs of the genus ...

Biogeography of the West Indies

As a review of the status of biogeography in the West Indies in the 1980s, the first edition of Biogeography of the West Indies: Past, Present, and Future provided a synthesis of our current knowledge of the systematics and distribution of major plant and animal groups in the Caribbean basin. The totally new and revised Second Edition, Biogeography

West Indian Green Monkeys

West Indian Green Monkeys


A Birder s West Indies

1991. Paul Butler: Parrot Man of the Caribbean. American Birds (spring): 26-35. Williams, Ernest E. 1989. Old Problems and New Opportunities in West Indian Biogeography. In Biogeography of the West Indies, Past, Present, and Future, ed.

A Birder   s West Indies

The West Indies offer so much more than sun, sand, and shopping. This sweeping arc of islands, which runs from Cuba to Grenada and includes the Virgin Islands, teems with a rich diversity of plant and animal life. Up to 40 percent of the plants in some forests are found nowhere else on earth, while the West Indian flyway is a critical link in the migratory routes of many birds. In A Birder's West Indies, Roland Wauer takes you on an island-by-island journey of discovery. He describes the unique natural features of each island and recounts his often fascinating experiences in seeking out the nearly 400 species of birds known in the West Indies. His accounts give insight into the birds' habitats, status, and ecology and record some of the threats posed by human activities. For readers planning trips to the West Indies, Wauer also includes helpful, up-to-date facts about the best times to travel, the kinds of entry and customs systems to expect, the money exchange services available, and general information about weather, food, and accommodations. Filling a unique niche among current guides, A Birder's West Indies offers both professional ornithologists and avocational bird watchers a chance to compare notes and experiences with an expert observer. And for readers who haven't yet visited the islands, Wauer's fluid prose and lovely color photographs will be the next-best thing to being there—and an irresistible invitation to go.

Zoogeography of Caribbean Insects

This book brings together for the first time the results of studies on a variety of insect groups native to the islands of the Caribbean, and is intended as an early progress report on the use of insects in biogeographical research from ...

Zoogeography of Caribbean Insects

Because historical biogeography—the study of historical causes of biotic distributions—is a comparative science, one must draw on data from many different disciplines. This book brings together for the first time the results of studies on a variety of insect groups native to the islands of the Caribbean, and is intended as an early progress report on the use of insects in biogeographical research from this area. The Caribbean has been of great interest to zoogeographers because of its geologic position and history, and because the fauna is of limited diversity relative to mainland America. This limited diversity coupled with the accessibility of the islands has resulted in the Caribbean fauna being relatively well known compared to other Neotropical faunas. Intriguing questions include how and when the West Indian islands became populated, how the fauna and flora of the islands relate to those of the continents, and whether the Caribbean islands served as a dispersal corridor between the Americas. As the interpretation of biographic patterns and knowledge of earth history go hand in hand, this book appropriately opens with a chapter reviewing the geology of the Caribbean and its land masses, including various interpretations of plate tectonics. Eight specialists on six orders of insects then present from study sites in the Caribbean the results of their research on the biogeographic distribution and historical biogeography of their study animals. A final chapter puts into a concise framework the various methods by which taxonomists approach biogeography.

Biogeography and Adaptation

In this thoughtful and wide-ranging discussion of evolutionary process and adaptive response, Geerat Vermeij elucidates the general principles that underlie the great diversity of marine forms found in the world's great oceans.

Biogeography and Adaptation

The driving forces of natural selection leave their traces in the shapes of living creatures and their patterns of distribution. In this thoughtful and wide-ranging discussion of evolutionary process and adaptive response, Geerat Vermeij elucidates the general principles that underlie the great diversity of marine forms found in the world's great oceans.

The Cayman Islands

The purpose of this book, therefore, is to bring all this scattered information together and to present a coherent account of the biogeography and ecology of the Islands, as an easily available reference source and as a foundation on which ...

The Cayman Islands

In the course of the last century a considerable amount of scientific work has been carried out in the Cayman Islands. The results of this (outlined in Chapter 1) are widely distributed in unpublished reports, university theses, various scientific publications and books, many of these sources being difficult to find and some now unobtainable. The purpose of this book, therefore, is to bring all this scattered information together and to present a coherent account of the biogeography and ecology of the Islands, as an easily available reference source and as a foundation on which future work can be based.

Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles

Amphibians and reptiles are the most numerous, diverse, and frequently encountered animals on the Caribbean islands. This book provides a variety of perspectives on this amazing group of organisms.

Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles

Amphibians and reptiles are the most numerous, diverse, and frequently encountered animals on the Caribbean islands. This book provides a variety of perspectives on this amazing group of organisms. Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles, compiled by an international team of zoologists, takes a fresh and detailed look at the complex biological puzzle of the Caribbean. The first true overview of the islands, it includes a historical examination of the people who have studied the Caribbean amphibians and reptiles. The book reviews the ecology, evolutionary history, and biogeographic explanations for the origins and diversity of the region's fauna with island-by-island coverage. It puts the Caribbean in perspective by comparing the islands to Central America and its amphibian reptile diversity. Additionally, the book includes figures, tables, and color plates which bring to life some of the region's most spectacular creatures. Key Features * Presents the first complete review of amphibians and reptiles in the Caribbean * Includes color plates and island maps * Contributors are recognized authorities in the field

American Megafaunal Extinctions at the End of the Pleistocene

In: Woods CA (ed) Biogeography of the West Indies: Past, present, and future. Sandhill Crane Press, Gainesville, FL, pp 153–166 Weksler M, Percequillo AR, Voss RS (2006) Ten new genera of oryzomyine rodents (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae).

American Megafaunal Extinctions at the End of the Pleistocene

The volume contains summaries of facts, theories, and unsolved problems pertaining to the unexplained extinction of dozens of genera of mostly large terrestrial mammals, which occurred ca. 13,000 calendar years ago in North America and about 1,000 years later in South America. Another equally mysterious wave of extinctions affected large Caribbean islands around 5,000 years ago. The coupling of these extinctions with the earliest appearance of human beings has led to the suggestion that foraging humans are to blame, although major climatic shifts were also taking place in the Americas during some of the extinctions. The last published volume with similar (but not identical) themes -- Extinctions in Near Time -- appeared in 1999; since then a great deal of innovative, exciting new research has been done but has not yet been compiled and summarized. Different chapters in this volume provide in-depth resumés of the chronology of the extinctions in North and South America, the possible insights into animal ecology provided by studies of stable isotopes and anatomical/physiological characteristics such as growth increments in mammoth and mastodont tusks, the clues from taphonomic research about large-mammal biology, the applications of dating methods to the extinctions debate, and archeological controversies concerning human hunting of large mammals.

Neotropical Biogeography

“Caribbean biogeography: Implications of recent plate tectonic studies. ... “Historical biogeography of West Indian vertebrates.” Annual Review of Ecology and ... Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and perspectives, 2nd edition.

Neotropical Biogeography

Neotropical Biogeography: Regionalization and Evolution presents the most comprehensive single-source treatment of the Neotropical region derived from evolutionary biogeographic studies. The book provides a biogeographic regionalization based on distributional patterns of plant and animal taxa, discusses biotic relationships drawn from track and cladistic biogeographic analyses, and identifies cenocrons (subsets of taxa within biotas identified by their common origin and evolutionary history). It includes maps, area cladograms and vegetation profiles. The aim of this reference is to provide a biogeographic regionalization that can be used by graduate students, researchers and other professionals concerned with understanding and describing distributional patterns of plants and animals in the Neotropical region. It covers the 53 biogeographic provinces of the Neotropical region that are classified into the Antillean, Brazilian and Chacoan subregions, and the Mexican and South American transition zones.

Biogeography and Plate Tectonics

The relationships of the West Indian herpetofauna have been summarized by Duellman (1979). There is a total of 505 species in 57 genera; 476 species and 18 of the genera are endemic. A phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of the ...

Biogeography and Plate Tectonics

One needs to look at only a small portion of the enormous literature on plate tectonics published in the last 15 years to realize that there are many differences between the various reconstructions that have been presented. It becomes obvious that, although there is a general agreement about the presence of an assembly of continents (a Pangaea) in the early Mesozoic, there is considerable disagreement among earth scientists as to the configurement of the assembly and the manner and timing of the subsequent dispersal. While the revolution in geophysics was taking place, systematic work in paleontology and neontology was being carried out. This book is an attempt to incorporate the biological evidence into the theory of plate tectonics. The author traces the changing relationships among the various biogeographic regions and demonstrates how such changes may often be correlated with the gradual geographic alteration of the earth's surface. He analyses recent information about the distribution of widespread groups of terrestrial and freshwater vertebrates, invertebrates and plants, and discusses the biogeographical effects of the movement of oceanic plates. It is particularly important to obtain dependable information about certain critical times in the history of continental relationships. We need to know when the terrestrial parts of the earth were broken apart and when they were joined together. The present investigation makes it clear that we cannot depend entirely on evidence from plate tectonics nor will purely biological evidence suffice. This book thus provides much of interest to systematists working on contemporary groups of plants and animals, paleontologists, evolutionary biologists, and professors teaching courses in biogeography.

Geology of Cuba

Introduction and historical overview of patterns of West Indian biogeography. En: Woods, C.A., y Sergile, F.E., (Editores) Biogeography of the West 2000 Iturralde-Vinent, M., MacPhee, R.D.E., Díaz-Franco, S., Rojas-Consuegra, R., ...

Geology of Cuba

The evolution of geological cartography in Cuba in its more than 135 years of history has been possible through the consultation of numerous archival reports, publications, maps and personal interviews with different authors and geologists of vast experience. A brief critical analysis is made of the increase in the degree of geological knowledge of the country since the elaboration of the Geological Sketch of the Cuban Island at a scale of 1: 2 000 000 (Fernández de Castro, 1883), first of Cuba and of Ibero-America, until the most recent Digital Geological Map of Cuba at scale 1: 100 000 (Pérez Aragón, 2016). Cuba and its surroundings are a geological mosaic in the southeast corner of the North American plate with rocks from many different origins, from Proterozoic to Quaternary, extended along the southern border of the plate. From the Eocene, this belt has been dissected by several great faults, related to the development of some great oceanic depressions (Cayman trough and Yucatan basin). The fossil record of Cuba, which covers approximately the last 200 million years of life on Earth, is rich in very varied fossils, witnessing a wide diversity of organisms, both animals and plants, that inhabited the Antillean and Caribbean region; and that constitute the inheritance of the biological diversity that the current Cuban archipelago exhibits. As a result of the preparation of the Cuban Metallogenic Map at scale 1: 250 000, forty-one models and eight sub-models of metallic mineral deposits were identified. These models, of descriptive–genetic type, together with the analysis of their spatial distribution and their relationship with geology, allowed the identification and mapping of ten mineral systems, linked to the geodynamic environments present in the Cuban territory. Cuba has large deposits of limestone, loam, dolomite, kaolin, gypsum and anhydrite, rock salt, marbles, sands and clays of different types, zeolites, peat, therapeutic peloids and many more. There are manifestations of decorative and precious rocks such as jasper, jadeite, different varieties of quartz and even xylopals. A compilation of geochemical data of oceanic basalt samples from previous works, together with data of analyzed samples during this study in order to discuss geochemical criteria based on immobile element (proxies for fractionation indices, alkalinity, mantle flow and subduction addition), provide a comprehensive ophiolite classification according to their tectonic setting. This book addresses different facets of the geological knowledge of Cuba: history of its cartography, marine geology, fossil record, stratigraphy, tectonics, classification of its ophiolites, quaternary deposits, metallogeny and minerageny.

Bones Clones and Biomes

“Patterns of Extinction in West Indian Bats.” In Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives, edited by C. A. Woods and F. E. Sergile, 369–407. Boca Raton: CRC Press. Morgan, G. S., and L. Wilkins. 2003.

Bones  Clones  and Biomes

"Bones, clones and biomes offers an exploration of the development and relationships of the modern mammal fauna through a series of studies that encompass the last 100 million years and all of Latin America and the Carribean." -- Inside dust jacket.

Bat Ecology

Journal of Zoology ( London ) , 243 : 117–136 . Rodriguez - Duran , A. , and T. H. Kunz . 2001. Biogeography of West Indian bats : an ecological perspective . Pp . 353-366 in : Biogeography of the West Indies ( C. A. Woods , ed . ) .

Bat Ecology

In recent years researchers have discovered that bats play key roles in many ecosystems as insect predators, seed dispersers, and pollinators. Bats also display astonishing ecological and evolutionary diversity and serve as important models for studies of a wide variety of topics, including food webs, biogeography, and emerging diseases. In Bat Ecology, world-renowned bat scholars present an up-to-date, comprehensive, and authoritative review of this ongoing research. The first part of the book covers the life history and behavioral ecology of bats, from migration to sperm competition and natural selection. The next section focuses on functional ecology, including ecomorphology, feeding, and physiology. In the third section, contributors explore macroecological issues such as the evolution of ecological diversity, range size, and infectious diseases (including rabies) in bats. A final chapter discusses conservation challenges facing these fascinating flying mammals. Bat Ecology is the most comprehensive state-of-the-field collection for scientists and researchers. Contributors: John D. Altringham, Robert M. R. Barclay, Tenley M. Conway, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Peggy Eby, Abigail C. Entwistle, Theodore H. Fleming, Patricia W. Freeman, Lawrence D. Harder, Gareth Jones, Linda F. Lumsden, Gary F. McCracken, Sharon L. Messenger, Bruce D. Patterson, Paul A. Racey, Jens Rydell, Charles E. Rupprecht, Nancy B. Simmons, Jean S. Smith, John R. Speakman, Richard D. Stevens, Elizabeth F. Stockwell, Sharon M. Swartz, Donald W. Thomas, Otto von Helversen, Gerald S. Wilkinson, Michael R. Willig, York Winter

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Journal ofAnimal Ecology 74:250–58. ... Caribbean historical biogeography: Was the dispersal-vicariance debate eliminated by an extraterrestrial bolide. ... In Biogeography of the West Indies:Patterns and Perspectives, ed.

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson's The Theory of Island Biogeography, first published by Princeton in 1967, is one of the most influential books on ecology and evolution to appear in the past half century. By developing a general mathematical theory to explain a crucial ecological problem--the regulation of species diversity in island populations--the book transformed the science of biogeography and ecology as a whole. In The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited, some of today's most prominent biologists assess the continuing impact of MacArthur and Wilson's book four decades after its publication. Following an opening chapter in which Wilson reflects on island biogeography in the 1960s, fifteen chapters evaluate and demonstrate how the field has extended and confirmed--as well as challenged and modified--MacArthur and Wilson's original ideas. Providing a broad picture of the fundamental ways in which the science of island biogeography has been shaped by MacArthur and Wilson's landmark work, The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited also points the way toward exciting future research.

Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

Albumin evolution in West Indian frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus (Leptodactylidae): Caribbean biogeography and a calibration of the albumin immunological clock. Journal of Zoology 225:413–426. Hass, C.A., S.B. Hedges, ...

Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

Adaptive radiation, which results when a single ancestral species gives rise to many descendants, each adapted to a different part of the environment, is possibly the single most important source of biological diversity in the living world. One of the best-studied examples involves Caribbean Anolis lizards. With about 400 species, Anolis has played an important role in the development of ecological theory and has become a model system exemplifying the integration of ecological, evolutionary, and behavioral studies to understand evolutionary diversification. This major work, written by one of the best-known investigators of Anolis, reviews and synthesizes an immense literature. Jonathan B. Losos illustrates how different scientific approaches to the questions of adaptation and diversification can be integrated and examines evolutionary and ecological questions of interest to a broad range of biologists.

Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas Volume 1 Conservation Biology and the Wider Caribbean

Hedges, S.B. (2001): Caribbean biogeography: an outline. In: Biogeography of the West Indies: Patterns and Perspectives, p. 15-33. Woods, C.A., Sergile, F.E., Eds, CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida. Hedges, S.B. (2006a): Caribherp: ...

Conservation of Caribbean Island Herpetofaunas Volume 1  Conservation Biology and the Wider Caribbean

Most of the islands of the Caribbean have long histories of herpetological exploration and discovery, and even longer histories of human-mediated environmental degradation. Collectively, they constitute a major biodiversity hotspot – a region rich in endemic species that are threatened with extinction. This two-volume series documents the existing status of herpetofaunas (including sea turtles) of the Caribbean, and highlights conservation needs and efforts. Previous contributions to West Indian herpetology have focused on taxonomy, ecology and evolution, particularly of lizards. This series provides a unique and timely review of the status and conservation of all groups of amphibians and reptiles in the region. This volume introduces the issues particularly affecting Caribbean herpetofaunas, and gives an overview of evolutionary and taxonomic patterns influencing their conservation.