Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability

However, the contributors to this volume argue against biosecurity as the new status quo by focusing instead on the ugly underbelly.

Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability

Life today is rife with rapid-fire 'high alert' responses, a proliferating trend that is especially pronounced in the US. September 11, 2001 looms as an inescapable spectral presence, defining an important baseline for the ramping up of biosecurity measures. However, the contributors to this volume argue against biosecurity as the new status quo by focusing instead on the ugly underbelly.

Moral Foods

Nancy N. Chen, “Between Abundance and Insecurity: Securing Food and
Medicine in an Age of Chinese Biotechnology,” in Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability,
ed. Nancy N. Chen and Lesley A. Sharp (Santa Fe, NM: SAR Press, 2014), 87–
102; ...

Moral Foods

Moral Foods: The Construction of Nutrition and Health in Modern Asia investigates how foods came to be established as moral entities, how moral food regimes reveal emerging systems of knowledge and enforcement, and how these developments have contributed to new Asian nutritional knowledge regimes. The collection’s focus on cross-cultural and transhistorical comparisons across Asia brings into view a broad spectrum of modern Asia that extends from East Asia, Southeast Asia, to South Asia, as well as into global communities of Western knowledge, practice, and power outside Asia. The first section, “Good Foods,” focuses on how food norms and rules have been established in modern Asia. Ideas about good foods and good bodies shift at different moments, in some cases privileging local foods and knowledge systems, and in other cases privileging foreign foods and knowledge systems. The second section, “Bad Foods,” focuses on what makes foods bad and even dangerous. Bad foods are not simply unpleasant or undesirable for aesthetic or sensory reasons, but they can hinder the stability and development of persons and societies. Bad foods are symbolically polluting, as in the case of foreign foods that threaten not only traditional foods, but also the stability and strength of the nation and its people. The third section, “Moral Foods,” focuses on how themes of good versus bad are embedded in projects to make modern persons, subjects, and states, with specific attention to the ambiguities and malleability of foods and health. The malleability of moral foods provides unique opportunities for understanding Asian societies’ dynamic position within larger global flows, connections, and disconnections. Collectively, the chapters raise intriguing questions about how foods and the bodies that consume them have been valued politically, economically, culturally, and morally, and about how those values originated and evolved. Consumers in modern Asia are not simply eating to satisfy personal desires or physiological needs, but they are also conscripted into national and global statemaking projects through acts of ingestion. Eating, then, has become about fortifying both the person and the nation.

The Transplant Imaginary

New York, N.Y. . Forthcoming. Perils Before Swine: Biosecurity and Scientific
Longing in Experimental Xenotransplant Research. In Bioinsecurity and
Vulnerability, edited by N. N. Chen and L.A. Sharp. Santa Fe: School for
Advanced ...

The Transplant Imaginary

In The Transplant Imaginary, author Lesley Sharp explores the extraordinarily surgically successful realm of organ transplantation, which is plagued worldwide by the scarcity of donated human parts, a quandary that generates ongoing debates over the marketing of organs as patients die waiting for replacements. These widespread anxieties within and beyond medicine over organ scarcity inspire seemingly futuristic trajectories in other fields. Especially prominent, longstanding, and promising domains include xenotransplantation, or efforts to cull fleshy organs from animals for human use, and bioengineering, a field peopled with “tinkerers” intent on designing implantable mechanical devices, where the heart is of special interest. Scarcity, suffering, and sacrifice are pervasive and, seemingly, inescapable themes that frame the transplant imaginary. Xenotransplant experts and bioengineers at work in labs in five Anglophone countries share a marked determination to eliminate scarcity and human suffering, certain that their efforts might one day altogether eliminate any need for parts of human origin. A premise that drives Sharp’s compelling ethnographic project is that high-stakes experimentation inspires moral thinking, informing scientists’ determination to redirect the surgical trajectory of transplantation and, ultimately, alter the integrity of the human form.

A Mosaic of Indigenous Legal Thought

Bioinsecurity being a term first coined by Nancy Chen and Lesley Sharp, In
Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability.24 Chen and Sharp make us aware of the
growing hysteria around worst-case scenarios of viral outbreaks, which, in turn,
fuels the ...

A Mosaic of Indigenous Legal Thought

This book offers an Indigenous supplement to the rich and growing area of visual legal scholarship. Organized around three narratives, each with an associated politico-poetic reading, the book addresses three major global issues: climate change, the trade in human body parts and bio-policing. Manifesting and engaging the traditional storytelling mode of classical Indigenous ontology, these narratives convey legal and political knowledge, not merely through logical argument, but rather through the feelings of law and the understanding of lawful behaviour produced by their rhythm. Through its own performativity, therefore, the book demonstrates how classical Indigenous legal traditions remain vital to the now pressing challenge of making peace with the earth.

The Theater of Operations

A section of chapter 5 appearedin Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability, edited by
Leslie Sharp andNancy Chen(Santa Fe: Schoolof Advanced Research Press).
My thanks to each of these venues, and theireditors, for supporting this project
both ...

The Theater of Operations

How did the most powerful nation on earth come to embrace terror as the organizing principle of its security policy? In The Theater of Operations, Joseph Masco locates the origins of the present-day U.S. counterterrorism apparatus in the Cold War's "balance of terror." He shows how, after the attacks of 9/11, the U.S. global War on Terror mobilized a wide range of affective, conceptual, and institutional resources established during the Cold War to enable a new planetary theater of operations. Tracing how specific aspects of emotional management, existential danger, state secrecy, and threat awareness have evolved as core aspects of the American social contract, Masco draws on archival, media, and ethnographic resources to offer a new portrait of American national security culture. Undemocratic and unrelenting, this counterterror state prioritizes speculative practices over facts, and ignores everyday forms of violence across climate, capital, and health in an unprecedented effort to anticipate and eliminate terror threats—real, imagined, and emergent.

Breeding Bio Insecurity

Breeding Bio Insecurity reveals the mistakes made to this point and lays out the necessary steps to set us on the path toward true biosecurity.

Breeding Bio Insecurity

In the years since the 9/11 attacks—and the subsequent lethal anthrax letters—the United States has spent billions of dollars on measures to defend the population against the threat of biological weapons. But as Lynn C. Klotz and Edward J. Sylvester argue forcefully in Breeding Bio Insecurity, all that money and effort hasn’t made us any safer—in fact, it has made us more vulnerable. Breeding Bio Insecurity reveals the mistakes made to this point and lays out the necessary steps to set us on the path toward true biosecurity. The fundamental problem with the current approach, according to the authors, is the danger caused by the sheer size and secrecy of our biodefense effort. Thousands of scientists spread throughout hundreds of locations are now working with lethal bioweapons agents—but their inability to make their work public causes suspicion among our enemies and allies alike, even as the enormous number of laboratories greatly multiplies the inherent risk of deadly accidents or theft. Meanwhile, vital public health needs go unmet because of this new biodefense focus. True biosecurity, the authors argue, will require a multipronged effort based in an understanding of the complexity of the issue, guided by scientific ethics, and watched over by a vigilant citizenry attentive to the difference between fear mongering and true analysis of risk. An impassioned warning that never loses sight of political and scientific reality, Breeding Bio Insecurity is a crucial first step toward meeting the evolving threats of the twenty-first century.

Borders and Crime

... marginalized and vulnerable of the world's populationis in fact central tothe
functioning of capitalism asa whole.Westart, therefore, with a discussionof
Indigenous and traditional peopleand the making notofbiosecurity, butof
bioinsecurity.

Borders and Crime

The collection considers the growing importance of the border as a prime site for criminal justice activity and explores the impact of border policing on human rights and global justice. It covers a range of subjects from e-trafficking, child soldiers, the 'global war on terror' in Africa and police activities that generate crime.

Princeton Alumni Weekly

Inside the U.S. biodefense program Lynn Klotz '65 and Edward Sylvester '65 say
that government labs make us more vulnerable Р 34 ... Breeding Bio Insecurity :
How U.S. Biodefense Is Exporting Fear , Globalizing Risk , and Making Us All ...

Princeton Alumni Weekly


The Reader s Digest

You look like you BIO - INSECURITY have a cold . ” ” When Richmond ' s wife ,
Susan , But a special report ... Even there , vulnerable to an attack today as it ever
it took two sets of X - rays and several was . Indeed , some biodefense experts ...

The Reader s Digest