Black Children in Hollywood Cinema

This book explores cultural conceptions of the child and the cinematic absence of black children from contemporary Hollywood film.

Black Children in Hollywood Cinema

This book explores cultural conceptions of the child and the cinematic absence of black children from contemporary Hollywood film. Debbie Olson argues that within the discourse of children’s studies and film scholarship in relation to the conception of “the child,” there is often little to no distinction among children by race—the “child” is most often discussed as a universal entity, as the embodiment of all things not adult, not (sexually) corrupt. Discussions about children of color among scholars often take place within contexts such as crime, drugs, urbanization, poverty, or lack of education that tend to reinforce historically stereotypical beliefs about African Americans. Olson looks at historical conceptions of childhood within scholarly discourse, the child character in popular film and what space the black child (both African and African American) occupies within that ideal.

The New brutality Film

The 1990s saw the emergence of a new kind of American cinema, which this book calls the “new-brutality film.” Violence and race have been at the heart of Hollywood cinema since its birth, but the new-brutality film was the first kind of ...

The New brutality Film

The 1990s saw the emergence of a new kind of American cinema, which this book calls the “new-brutality film.” Violence and race have been at the heart of Hollywood cinema since its birth, but the new-brutality film was the first kind of popular American cinema to begin making this relationship explicit. The rise of this cinema coincided with the rebirth of a long-neglected strand of film theory, which seeks to unravel the complex relations of affect between the screen and the viewer. This book analyses and connects both of these developments, arguing that films like Falling Down, Reservoir Dogs, Se7en, and Strange Days sought to reanimate the affective impact of white Hollywood cinema by miming the power of African-American and particularly hip-hop culture. The book uses several films as case-studies to chart these developments: • Falling Down both appropriates of the political black rage of the ‘hood film and is a transition point between the white postmodern blockbuster and the new-brutality film. • Gangsta films like Boyz N the Hood and Menace II Society provided the inspiration for much of the new-brutality film’s mimesis of African-American culture • The films of Quentin Tarantino (including Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction) are new-brutality films that attempt to reanimate the affective power of Hollywood cinema. • Se7en, Strange Days, Fight Club,and The Matrix trilogy signify both the development and the demise of the new-brutality film. This book charts and analyses an important period of Hollywood cinema as well as engaging with key contemporary thinkers (Deleuze, Jameson, Zizek and Benjamin) in a strikingly innovative fashion. The work will appeal to dedicated film scholars, critical theorists and readers with a general interest in film.

New Perspectives on African Childhood

Debbie Olson examines images of the child in West African cinema, in diaspora and exilic cinemas, Hollywood cinema, in video games, advertising, and in/on material objects for children. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Red Feather Journal: ...

New Perspectives on African Childhood

What does it mean to be a child in Africa? In the detached Western media, narratives of penury, wickedness and death have dominated portrayals of African childhood. The hegemonic lens of the West has failed to take into account the intricacies of not only what it means to be an African child in local and culturally specific contexts, but also African childhood in general. Challenging colonial discourses, this edited volume guides the reader through different comprehensions and perspectives of childhood in Africa. Using a blend of theory, empiricism and history, the contributors to this volume offer studies from a range of fields including African literature, Afro-centric psychology and sociology. Importantly, in its eclectic geographical coverage of Africa, this book unashamedly presents the good, the bad and the ugly of African childhood. The resilience, creativity, pains and triumphs of African childhood are skilfully woven together to present the myriad of lived experiences and aspirations of children from across Africa. As an important contribution to African childhood studies, this book has the potential to be used by policymakers to shape, sustain or change socio-cultural, economic and education systems that accommodate African childhood dynamics and experiences at different levels.

Transcultural Images in Hollywood Cinema

Transcultural Images in Hollywood Cinemaexamines the transnational and transcultural characteristics of Hollywood cinema.

Transcultural Images in Hollywood Cinema

Transcultural Images in Hollywood Cinemaexamines the transnational and transcultural characteristics of Hollywood cinema. The narrative, cinematographic, and aesthetic structures of Hollywood cinema are turned upside down as chapters analyze gender, social, cultural, and economic-political contexts.

Children and Childhood in the Works of Stephen King

She is the editor-in-chief of Red Feather Journal: An International Journal of Children in Popular Culture (www.redfeatherjournal.org), author of Black Children in Hollywood Cinema: Cast in Shadow (Palgrave 2017) and editor of The Child ...

Children and Childhood in the Works of Stephen King

This unique and timely collection examines childhood and the child character throughout Stephen King’s works, from his early novels and short stories, through film adaptations, to his most recent publications. King’s use of child characters within the framework of horror (or of horrific childhood) raises questions about adult expectations of children, childhood, the American family, child agency, and the nature of fear and terror for (or by) children. The ways in which King presents, complicates, challenges, or terrorizes children and notions of childhood provide a unique lens through which to examine American culture, including both adult and social anxieties about children and childhood across the decades of King’s works.

Precious

Identity, Adaptation and the African-American Youth Film Katherine Whitehurst ... Olson, D. (2017) Black Children in Hollywood Cinema: Cast in Shadow, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. Orr, C. (2009) ' e Movie Review: “Precious”,' New Republic ...

Precious

Examining how the discourses of youth, race, poverty and identity take shape when Push is adapted to the big screen, this book brings together valuable research to delve into representations of African-American girlhood. The book draws attention to how Black girlhood takes shape in the film under the dominant White discourses that racialise non-White bodies, and examines how these discourses inform a critical reception of the film and Precious, as a Black girl. Through a consideration of Black culture and heritage, it questions what narratives of girlhood, growth and development are afforded to the main character, in a film that is informed by neoliberal and colour-blind discourses. Highlighting the social context in which Precious was received, the book draws attention to how a discussion of Precious in the critical press gives insight into the racial politics that were dominant at the time of the film’s release. It considers whether race impacts how the film engages with, reflects and moves beyond conventions within the genre of youth film. Concise and engaging, this vital book sheds light on underrepresented areas of film studies that make it an invaluable resource for students and scholars of film, race and youth cultures.

Encountering the Other

The Child in Contemporary Latin American Cinema. ... Screen Adaptations and the Politics of Childhood: Transforming Children's Literature into Film. ... Olson, Debbie C. Black Children in Hollywood Cinema: Cast ...

Encountering the Other

How do religious traditions create strangers and neighbors? How do they construct otherness? Or, instead, work to overcome it? In this exciting collection of interdisciplinary essays, scholars and activists from various traditions explore these questions. Through legal and media studies, they reveal how we see religious others. They show that Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and Sikh texts frame others in open-ended ways. Conflict resolution experts and Hindu teachers, they explain, draw on a shared positive psychology. Jewish mystics and Christian contemplatives use powerful tools of compassionate perception. Finally, the authors explain how Christian theology can help teach respectful views of difference. They are not afraid to discuss how religious groups have alienated one another. But, together, they choose to draw positive lessons about future cooperation.

Death in Classical Hollywood Cinema

See also Sklar, Movie-Made America, 174–175. Henry James Forman, Our Movie Made Children (New York: The MacMillan Company, 1933), 193. See also chapter XV on a “congested” area of New York City. Black, Hollywood Censored, 109.

Death in Classical Hollywood Cinema

Boaz Hagin carries out a philosophical examination of the issue of death as it is represented and problematized in Hollywood cinema of the classical era (1920s-1950s) and in later mainstream films, looking at four major genres: the Western, the gangster film, melodrama and the war film.

Stealing the Show

Reversing angles, as it were, the chapter then moves to focus upon African American children's consumption and reception of Hollywood film in the 1930s and early 1940s. Using historically relevant memoir and autobiographical sources ...

Stealing the Show

Stealing the Show is a study of African American actors in Hollywood during the 1930s, a decade that saw the consolidation of stardom as a potent cultural and industrial force. Petty focuses on five performers whose Hollywood film careers flourished during this period—Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington, Lincoln “Stepin Fetchit” Perry, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, and Hattie McDaniel—to reveal the “problematic stardom” and the enduring, interdependent patterns of performance and spectatorship for performers and audiences of color. She maps how these actors—though regularly cast in stereotyped and marginalized roles—employed various strategies of cinematic and extracinematic performance to negotiate their complex positions in Hollywood and to ultimately “steal the show.” Drawing on a variety of source materials, Petty explores these stars’ reception among Black audiences and theorizes African American viewership in the early twentieth century. Her book is an important and welcome contribution to the literature on the movies.

Stealing the Show

Stealing the Show is a study of African American actors in Hollywood during the 1930s, a decade that saw the consolidation of stardom as a potent cultural and industrial force.

Stealing the Show

Stealing the Show is a study of African American actors in Hollywood during the 1930s, a decade that saw the consolidation of stardom as a potent cultural and industrial force. Petty focuses on five performers whose Hollywood film careers flourished during this period—Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington, Lincoln “Stepin Fetchit” Perry, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, and Hattie McDaniel—to reveal the “problematic stardom” and the enduring, interdependent patterns of performance and spectatorship for performers and audiences of color. She maps how these actors—though regularly cast in stereotyped and marginalized roles—employed various strategies of cinematic and extracinematic performance to negotiate their complex positions in Hollywood and to ultimately “steal the show.” Drawing on a variety of source materials, Petty explores these stars’ reception among Black audiences and theorizes African American viewership in the early twentieth century. Her book is an important and welcome contribution to the literature on the movies.

Promises of Citizenship

The B-movie genre, churned out with production-line efficiency and constituting the majority of Hollywood fare, ... British civilians were often surprised that African American soldiers were less homogeneous than their Hollywood cinema ...

Promises of Citizenship

Since the earliest days of the nation, US citizenship has been linked to military service. Even though blacks fought and died in all American wars, their own freedom was usually restricted or denied. In many ways, World War II exposed this contradiction. As demand for manpower grew during the war, government officials and military leaders realized that the war could not be won without black support. To generate African American enthusiasm, the federal government turned to mass media. Several government films were produced and distributed, movies that have remained largely unexamined by scholars. Kathleen M. German delves into the dilemma of race and the federal government's attempts to appeal to black patriotism and pride even while postponing demands for equality and integration until victory was achieved. German's study intersects three disciplines: the history of the African American experience in World War II, the theory of documentary film, and the study of rhetoric. One of the main films of the war era, The Negro Soldier, fractured the long tradition of degrading minstrel caricatures by presenting a more dignified public image of African Americans. Along with other government films, the narrative within The Negro Soldier transformed the black volunteer into an able soldier. It included African Americans in the national mythology by retelling American history to recognize black participation. As German reveals, through this new narrative with more dignified images, The Negro Soldier and other films performed rhetorical work by advancing the agenda of black citizenship.

Contemporary Black American Cinema

... can be understood as an ambitious engagement in the admittedly limited tradition of black-cast Hollywood cinema. ... This look at the Bible through the innocent imaginations of black children begins with church elders and children ...

Contemporary Black American Cinema

Contemporary Black American Cinema offers a fresh collection of essays on African American film, media and visual culture in the era of global multiculturalism. Integrating theory, history, and criticism, the contributing authors deftly connect interdisciplinary perspectives from American studies, cinema studies, cultural studies, political science, media studies, and Queer theory. This multidisciplinary methodology expands the discursive and interpretive registers of film analysis. From Paul Robeson's and Sidney Poitier's star vehicles to Lee Daniels' directorial forays, these essays include but surpass discussions of urban realism in New Black Cinema. These entries address the career legacies of film stars, examine various iterations of Blaxploitation-animation, question the comedic politics of fat suit films, and celebrate the innovation of avant-garde and experimental cinema.

The Galaxy Is Rated G

Essays on Children's Science Fiction Film and Television R.C. Neighbors, Sandy Rankin ... exclusion may be a popular cinematic sf discourse, but the reality here on earth is that black children have witnessed the first African American ...

The Galaxy Is Rated G

Through spaceships, aliens, ray guns and other familiar trappings, science fiction uses the future (and sometimes the past) to comment on current social, cultural and political ideologies; the same is true of science fiction in children’s film and television. This collection of essays analyzes the confluences of science fiction and children’s visual media, covering such cultural icons as Flash Gordon, the Jetsons and Star Wars, as well as more contemporary fare like the films Wall-E, Monsters vs. Aliens and Toy Story. Collectively, the essays discover, applaud and critique the hidden—and not-so-hidden—messages presented on our children’s film and TV screens.

Uncle

'Sambo Werry Dry,' which depicted a Black male servant sitting at a table by an open window at night, ... 13 As Debbie Olson writes in Black Children in Hollywood Cinema, 'Shorts like Ten Pickaninnies and the numerous versions of Uncle ...

Uncle

From martyr to insult, how “Uncle Tom” has influenced two centuries of racial politics. Jackie Robinson, President Barack Obama, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, O.J. Simpson and Christopher Darden have all been accused of being an Uncle Tom during their careers. How, why, and with what consequences for our society did Uncle Tom morph first into a servile old man and then to a racial epithet hurled at African American men deemed, by other Black people, to have betrayed their race? Uncle Tom, the eponymous figure in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s sentimental anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, was a loyal Christian who died a martyr’s death. But soon after the best-selling novel appeared, theatre troupes across North America and Europe transformed Stowe’s story into minstrel shows featuring white men in blackface. In Uncle, Cheryl Thompson traces Tom’s journey from literary character to racial trope. She explores how Uncle Tom came to be and exposes the relentless reworking of Uncle Tom into a nostalgic, racial metaphor with the power to shape how we see Black men, a distortion visible in everything from Uncle Ben and Rastus The Cream of Wheat chef to Shirley Temple and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson to Bill Cosby. In Donald Trump’s post-truth America, where nostalgia is used as a political tool to rewrite history, Uncle makes the case for why understanding the production of racial stereotypes matters more than ever before.

The Philosophy of Tim Burton

Her research interests include West African film, images of African and African American children in film and popular media, transnationalism, and New Hollywood Cinema. She is the coeditor ofLost and Othered Children in Contemporary ...

The Philosophy of Tim Burton

In 1952, just one year after Coach Adolph Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats won their third national championship in four years, an unlikely high school basketball team from rural Graves County, Kentucky, stole the spotlight and the media's attention. Inspired by young coach Jack Story and by the Harlem Globetrotters, the Cuba Cubs grabbed headlines when they rose from relative obscurity to defeat the big-city favorite and win the state championship. A classic underdog tale, The Graves County Boys chronicles how five boys from a tiny high school in southwestern Kentucky captured the hearts of basketball fans nationwide. Marianne Walker weaves together details about the players, their coach, and their relationships in a page-turning account of triumph over adversity. This inspiring David and Goliath story takes the reader on a journey from the team's heartbreaking defeat in the 1951 state championship to their triumphant victory over Louisville Manual the next year. More than just a basketball narrative, the book explores a period in American life when indoor plumbing and electricity were still luxuries in some areas of the country and when hardship was a way of life. With no funded school programs or bus system, the Cubs's success was a testament to the sacrifices of family and neighbors who believed in their team. Featuring new photographs, a foreword by University of Kentucky coach Joe B. Hall, and a new epilogue detailing where the players are now, The Graves County Boys is an unforgettable story of how a community pulled together to make a dream come true.

Reel to Real

Even black children cannot be spared Hollywood's cruelty. Watching the film Paris Trout, audiences witness the prolonged brutal slaughter of a gifted southern black girl by a powerful sadistic racist white man. The black males who are ...

Reel to Real

Movies matter – that is the message of Reel to Real, bell hooks’ classic collection of essays on film. They matter on a personal level, providing us with unforgettable moments, even life-changing experiences and they can confront us, too, with the most profound social issues of race, sex and class. Here bell hooks – one of America’s most celebrated and thrilling cultural critics – talks back to films that have moved and provoked her, from Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction to the work of Spike Lee. Including also her conversations with master filmmakers such as Charles Burnett and Julie Dash, Reel to Real is a must read for anyone who believes that movies are worth arguing about.

Moonlight

Loist, S. (2017) 'Crossover Dreams: Global Circulation of Queer Film on the Film Festival Circuits', Diogenes, Vol. 62, No. 1, pp. ... Olson, D. (2017) Black Children in Hollywood Cinema: Cast in Shadow, London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Moonlight

This book helps readers understand Moonlight’s profound political and social importance, the innovative technical choices adopted by director Barry Jenkins and the film’s adoption and disruption of traditional coming-of-age themes through the specific prism of Chiron’s childhood and youth. Moonlight (2016) is an intensely moving and poetically rendered coming-of-age story about a young gay Black boy, Chiron. Highly praised by both critics and audiences internationally, it garnered a surprise Best Picture win at the 2017 Academy Awards, enshrining its significance within a global cinematic canon. This book provides an account of how Moonlight can be situated in relation to African American youth films, contemporary queer cinema and its appeal to the youth market and representations of non-normative childhood and adolescence. It analyses the reception of Moonlight in terms of its form and profound emotional impact on spectators offerning new visions of African American boyhoods while also contributing an extended exploration of the social and political context of the film in relation to Obama, Trump and diversity in filmmaking. Highlighting to students and scholars the powerful emotional pull of Moonlight and why it is a highly significant film, this book is ideal for those interested in critical race studies, queer theory, youth cinema, African American cinema and LGBTQ cinema.

From African Peer Review Mechanisms to African Queer Review Mechanisms

Okoth, A. (2006) A History of Africa: African Societies and the Establishment of Colonial Rule, 1800 – 1915. East African Publishers. Olson, D. (2017) Black Children in Hollywood Cinema: Cast in Shadow. Springer.

From African Peer Review Mechanisms to African Queer Review Mechanisms

Tracing recent bouts of globalised Mugabephobia to Robert Mugabe’s refusal to be neoimperially penetrated, this book juxtaposes economic liberalisation with the mounting liberalisation of African orifices. Reading land repossession and economic structural adjustment programmes together with what they call neoimperial structural adjustment of African orifices, the authors argue that there has been liberalisation of African orifices in a context where Africans are ironically prevented from repossessing their material resources. Juxtaposing recent bouts of Mugabephobia with discourses on homophobia, the book asks why empire prefers liberalising African orifices rather than attending to African demands for restitution, restoration and reparations. Noting that empire opposes African sovereignty, autonomy, and centralisation of power while paradoxically promoting transnational corporations’ centralisation of power over African economies, the book challenges contemporary discourses about shared sovereignty, distributed governance, heterarchy, heteronomy and onticology. Arguing that colonialists similarly denied Africans of their human essence, the tome problematises queer sexualities, homosexuality, ecosexuality, cybersexuality and humanoid robotic sexuality all of which complicate supposedly fundamental distinctions between human beings and animals and machines. Provocatively questioning queer sexuality and liberalised orifices that serve to divert African attention from the more serious unfinished business of repossessing material resources, the book insightfully compares Robert Gabriel Mugabe, Thomas Sankara and Julius Kambarage Nyerere who emphasised the imperatives of African autonomy, ownership, control and sovereignty over natural resources. Observing Africans’ interest in repossessing ownership and control over their resources, the book wonders why so much, queer, international attention is focused on foisting queer sexuality while downplaying more burning issues of resource repossession, human dignity, equality and equity craved by Africans for whom life is not confined to sexuality. With insights for scholars in sociology, development studies, law, politics, African studies, anthropology, transformation, decolonisation and decoloniality, the book argues that liberal democracy is a façade in a world that is actually ruled through criminocracy.

Ziegfeld Girl

The shot of the black children in the street provides a glimpse of another theater , so to speak , a black ... musical on another street . a My argument here has been that Berkeley's women as mass The Ziegfeld Girl and Hollywood Cinema 183.

Ziegfeld Girl

A study of the iconographic significance of the Ziegfeld girl in twentieth-century American conceptions of sexuality, race, class, and consumerism.

Children s Films

Little wonder Temple Black, as she would later become, refers to herself in her autobiography Child Star as a "tiny ... Street comments that Freddie Bartholomew was "the hottest child property in Hollywood" ("Overview" 15) at the time.

Children s Films

This study examines children's films from various critical perspectives, including those provided by classical and current film theory.