Black Tudors

They were paid wages like any other Tudors. The untold stories of the Black Tudors, dazzlingly brought to life by Kaufmann, will transform how we see this most intriguing period of history.

Black Tudors

Shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2018 A Book of the Year for the Evening Standard and the Observer A black porter publicly whips a white Englishman in the hall of a Gloucestershire manor house. A Moroccan woman is baptised in a London church. Henry VIII dispatches a Mauritanian diver to salvage lost treasures from the Mary Rose. From long-forgotten records emerge the remarkable stories of Africans who lived free in Tudor England… They were present at some of the defining moments of the age. They were christened, married and buried by the Church. They were paid wages like any other Tudors. The untold stories of the Black Tudors, dazzlingly brought to life by Kaufmann, will transform how we see this most intriguing period of history.

England s Other Countrymen

Onyeka Nubia's original research shows that Tudors from many walks of life regularly interacted with people of African descent, both at home and abroad, revealing a genuine pragmatism towards race and acceptance of difference.

England   s Other Countrymen

The Tudor period remains a source of timeless fascination, with endless novels, TV programmes and films depicting the period in myriad ways. And yet our image of the Tudor era remains overwhelmingly white. This ground-breaking and provocative new book seeks to redress the balance: revealing not only how black presence in Tudor England was far greater than has previously been recognised, but that Tudor conceptions of race were far more complex than we have been led to believe. Onyeka Nubia's original research shows that Tudors from many walks of life regularly interacted with people of African descent, both at home and abroad, revealing a genuine pragmatism towards race and acceptance of difference. Nubia also rejects the influence of the 'Curse of Ham' myth on Tudor thinking, persuasively arguing that many of the ideas associated with modern racism are in fact relatively recent developments. England's Other Countrymen is a bravura and eloquent forgotten history of diversity and cultural exchange, and casts a new light on our own attitudes towards race.

Black and British

Most black Tudors probably arrived in Britain via the Iberian and Mediterranean worlds. Some were brought to Britain by their employers.

Black and British

'[A] comprehensive and important history of black Britain . . . Written with a wonderful clarity of style and with great force and passion.' – Kwasi Kwarteng, Sunday Times In this vital re-examination of a shared history, historian and broadcaster David Olusoga tells the rich and revealing story of the long relationship between the British Isles and the people of Africa and the Caribbean. This edition, fully revised and updated, features a new chapter encompassing the Windrush scandal and the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020, events which put black British history at the centre of urgent national debate. Black and British is vivid confirmation that black history can no longer be kept separate and marginalised. It is woven into the cultural and economic histories of the nation and it belongs to us all. Drawing on new genealogical research, original records, and expert testimony, Black and British reaches back to Roman Britain, the medieval imagination, Elizabethan ‘blackamoors’ and the global slave-trading empire. It shows that the great industrial boom of the nineteenth century was built on American slavery, and that black Britons fought at Trafalgar and in the trenches of both World Wars. Black British history is woven into the cultural and economic histories of the nation. It is not a singular history, but one that belongs to us all. Unflinching, confronting taboos, and revealing hitherto unknown scandals, Olusoga describes how the lives of black and white Britons have been entwined for centuries. Winner of the 2017 PEN Hessell-Tiltman Prize. Winner of the Longman History Today Trustees’ Award. A Waterstones History Book of the Year. Longlisted for the Orwell Prize. Shortlisted for the inaugural Jhalak Prize.

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers

... New York: Longman, 1996) Miranda Kaufmann, Black Tudors: The Untold Story (London: Oneworld Publications, 2017) Harry Kelsey, Francis Drake: The Queen's ...

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers

Tudor and Stuart Seafarers tells the compelling story of how a small island positioned on the edge of Europe transformed itself into the world's leading maritime power. In 1485, England was an inward-looking country, its priorities largely domestic and European. Over the subsequent two centuries, however, this country was transformed, as the people of the British Isles turned to the sea in search of adventure, wealth and rule. Explorers voyaged into unknown regions of the world, while merchants, following in their wake, established lucrative trade routes with the furthest reaches of the globe. At home, people across Britain increasingly engaged with the sea, whether through their own lived experiences or through songs, prose and countless other forms of material culture. This exquisitely illustrated book delves into a tale of exploration, encounter, adventure, power, wealth and conflict. Topics include the exploration of the Americas, the growth of worldwide trade, piracy and privateering and the defeat of the Spanish Armada, brought to life through a variety of personalities from the well-known – Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Drake and Samuel Pepys – to the ordinary sailors, dockyard workers and their wives and families whose lives were so dramatically shaped by the sea.

Voices Diver s Daughter A Tudor Story

I had bought Miranda Kaufmann's Black Tudors: The Untold Story a few weeks before I was asked to write this story. A happy coincidence!

Voices  Diver s Daughter  A Tudor Story

A gripping heart-in-your-mouth adventure told by Eve, a Tudor girl who sets out on a dangerous journey to change her life for the better. Voices: Diver's Daughter - A Tudor Story brings Eve and her mother, who was stolen from her family in Mozambique as a child, from the Southwark slums of Elizabethan London to England's southern coast. When they hear from a Mary Rose survivor that one of the African free-divers who was sent to salvage its treasures is alive and well and living in Southampton, mother and daughter agree to try to find him and attempt to dive the wreck of another ship, rumoured to be rich with treasures. But will the pair survive when the man arrives to claim his 'share'? Will Eve overcome her fear of the water to help rescue her mother? In this thrilling adventure based on real events, Patrice Lawrence shows us a fascinating and rarely seen world that's sure to hook young readers. VOICES: A thrilling series showcasing some of the UK's finest writers for young people. Voices reflects the authentic, unsung stories of our past. Each shows that, even in times of great upheaval, a myriad of people have arrived on this island and made a home for themselves - from Roman times to the present day.

The Tudors on Film and Television

2001, or Black— adder Remastered: The Ultimate Edition, BBC Warner. 2009. The Black Adder (1983) and Blackadder II (1986) [seen as Black Adder in pilot and ...

The Tudors on Film and Television

With its mix of family drama, sex and violence, Britain’s Tudor dynasty (1485–1603) has long excited the interest of filmmakers and moviegoers. Since the birth of movie-making technology, the lives and times of kings Henry VII, Henry VIII, and Edward VI and queens Mary I, Jane Grey and Elizabeth I have remained popular cinematic themes. From 1895’s The Execution of Mary Stuart to 2011’s Anonymous, this comprehensive filmography chronicles every known movie about the Tudor era, including feature films; made-for-television films, mini-series, and series; documentaries; animated films; and shorts. From royal biographies to period pieces to modern movies with flashbacks or time travel, this work reveals how these films both convey the attitudes of Tudor times and reflect the era in which they were made.

Dark History of the Tudors

He ordered 12,000 masses to be said for her soul, wore black for three months and, ... TUDOR HEALTH AND CHILDBIRTH STAYING HEALTHY IN Tudor times was.

Dark History of the Tudors

Divorced, beheaded, died, Divorced, beheaded, survived. – the fates of Henry VIII’s wives Beginning with the victory of Henry Tudor over Richard III at Bosworth Field in 1485, and ending with the death of the childless Elizabeth I in 1603 following a 45-year reign, the Tudor dynasty marks a period in British history where England was transformed from a minor medieval kingdom to a preeminent European power on the verge of empire. Yet this period of great upheaval had a dark side: Henry VIII’s notorious break with the Roman Catholic Church and his divorce or execution of four of his six wives; the sad story of teenaged Lady Jane Grey, who was monarch for just nine days before being executed in favor of the Catholic Mary I; and Queen Elizabeth I, who defeated the Spanish Armada, suppressed the Irish rebellion, and sponsored pirates and slave traders in the quest for new territories in America. Illustrated with 180 photographs, paintings, and illustrations, Dark History of the Tudors is a fascinating, accessible account of the murder, adultery, and religious turmoil that characterized England’s most infamous royal dynasty.

African Migration Human Rights and Literature

Literary scholars have argued the toss about whether the dark lady in Shakespeare's ... Miranda Kaufmann's book on black Tudors has multiple sightings of.

African Migration  Human Rights and Literature

This innovative book looks at the topic of migration through the prism of law and literature. The author uses a rich mix of novels, short stories, literary realism, human rights and comparative literature to explore the experiences of African migrants and asylum seekers. The book is divided into two. Part one is conceptual and focuses on art activism and the myriad ways in which people have sought to 'write justice.' Using Mazrui's diasporas of slavery and colonialism, it then considers histories of migration across the centuries before honing in on the recent anti-migration policies of western states. Achiume is used to show how these histories of imposition and exploitation create a bond which bestows on Africans a “status as co-sovereigns of the First World through citizenship.” The many fictional examples of the schemes used to gain entry are set against the formal legal processes. Attention is paid to life post-arrival which for asylum seekers may include periods in detention. The impact of the increased hostility of receiving states is examined in light of their human rights obligations. Consideration is paid to how Africans navigate their post-migration lives which includes reconciling themselves to status fracture-taking on jobs for which they are over-qualified, while simultaneously dealing with the resentment borne of status threat on the part of the citizenry. Part two moves from the general to consider the intersections of gender and status focusing on women, LGBTI individuals and children. Focusing on their human rights and the fictional literature, chapter four looks at women who have been trafficked as well as domestic workers and hotel maids while chapter five is on LGBTI people whose legal and literary stories are only now being told. The final substantive chapter considers the experiences of children who may arrive as unaccompanied minors. Using a mixture of poetry and first person accounts, the chapter examines the post-arrival lives of children, some of whom may be citizens but who are continually made to feel like outsiders. The conclusion follows, starting with two stories about walls by Hadero and Lanchester which are used to illustrate the themes discussed in the book. Few African lawyers write about literature and few books and articles in Western law and literature look at books by or about Africans, so a book that engages with both is long overdue. This book provides fascinating reading for academics, students of law, literature, gender and migration studies, and indeed the general public.

Craft Like the Tudors

Three You cardboard will need: boxes Scissors Glue and masking tape Sand White acrylic paint Brushes Marker Black construction paper make a In Tudor times, ...

Craft Like the Tudors

Readers will lose their heads over this fascinating guide to crafting like the Tudors! They�ll travel back to the English courts where the Tudors ruled for over a century, from King Henry VII to Queen Elizabeth I. As they craft, readers will learn amazing facts about life during the Tudor reign. This intriguing (and often vicious!) period of history will inspire curiosity and creativity. Hands-on art activities immerse readers in another time and culture, helping them to retain historical information. Easy step-by-step instructions with accompanying photographs make crafts accessible and safe.

Masters and Servants in Tudor England

certainly followed the fashion for employing black servants. In 1577 the Lord Chamberlain's accounts show a very fine Gascon coat being made for a 'lytle ...

Masters and Servants in Tudor England

Although life in Tudor was ordered in a strict hierarchy, service was common for all classes, and servants were not necessarily the lowest stratum in society. This book looks at the servant life in the Tudor period. It examines relations between servants and their masters, peering into the bedrooms, kitchens and parlours of the ordinary folk.

What Should Schools Teach

Kaufmann, M. (2017) Black Tudors: The untold story. London: One World Publications. Khan, Y. (2015) The Raj at War: A people's history of India's Second ...

What Should Schools Teach

The design of school curriculums involves deep thought about the nature of knowledge and its value to learners and society. It is a serious responsibility that raises a number of questions. What is knowledge for? What knowledge is important for children to learn? How do we decide what knowledge matters in each school subject? And how far should the knowledge we teach in school be related to academic disciplinary knowledge? These and many other questions are taken up in What Should Schools Teach? The blurring of distinctions between pedagogy and curriculum, and between experience and knowledge, has served up a confusing message for teachers about the part that each plays in the education of children. Schools teach through subjects, but there is little consensus about what constitutes a subject and what they are for. This book aims to dispel confusion through a robust rationale for what schools should teach that offers key understanding to teachers of the relationship between knowledge (what to teach) and their own pedagogy (how to teach), and how both need to be informed by values of intellectual freedom and autonomy. This second edition includes new chapters on Chemistry, Drama, Music and Religious Education, and an updated chapter on Biology. A revised introduction reflects on emerging discourse around decolonizing the curriculum, and on the relationship between the knowledge that children encounter at school and in their homes.

All Made Up

26. Miranda Kaufmann , Black Tudors : The Untold Story ( London : Oneworld Publications , 2017 ) , 1-2 . 27. Yumna Siddiqi , “ Dark Incontinents : The ...

All Made Up

A fascinating journey through history and culture, examining how makeup affects self-empowerment, how people have used it to define (and defy) their roles in society, and why we all need to care There is a history and a cultural significance that comes with wearing cat-eye-inspired liner or a bold red lip, one that many women feel to this day, even if we don’t realize exactly why. Increasingly, people of all genders are wrestling with what it means to be a woman living in a patriarchy, and part of that is how looking like a woman—whatever that means—affects people’s real lives. Through the stories of famous women like Cleopatra, Empress Wu, Madam C. J. Walker, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marsha P. Johnson, Rae Nudson unpacks makeup’s cultural impact—including how it can be used to shape a personal or cultural narrative, how often beauty standards align with whiteness, how and when it can be used for safety, and its function in the workplace, to name a few examples. Every woman has had to make a very personal choice about her relationship with makeup, and consciously or unconsciously, every woman knows that the choice is never entirely hers to make. This book also holds space for complicating factors, especially the ways that beauty standards differ across race, class, and culture. Engaging and informative, All Made Up will expand the discussion around what it means to participate in creating your own self-image.

John Cage and David Tudor

Black Mtn. : Black Mountain College. In early summer 1951, Tudor was working with Jean Erdman for her residency at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

John Cage and David Tudor

John Cage is best known for his indeterminate music, which leaves a significant level of creative decision-making in the hands of the performer. But how much licence did Cage allow? Martin Iddon's book is the first volume to collect the complete extant correspondence between the composer and pianist David Tudor, one of Cage's most provocative and significant musical collaborators. The book presents their partnership from working together in New York in the early 1950s, through periods on tour in Europe, until the late stages of their work from the 1960s onwards, carried out almost exclusively within the frame of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Tackling the question of how much creative flexibility Tudor was granted, Iddon includes detailed examples of the ways in which Tudor realised Cage's work, especially focusing on Music of Changes to Variations II, to show how composer and pianist influenced one another's methods and styles.

The Tudors Thy Will Be Done

Cromwell wore his black robe and broad black cap with a jeweled pin. The heavy chain draped around his shoulders bore a gold Tudor rose pendant, ...

The Tudors  Thy Will Be Done

A novelization of the third season of the popular historical drama based on the life of Henry VIII traces his marriages to Jane Seymour and Anne of Cleves, a period marked by the birth of his first legitimate son, tenacious political alliances, and a continuing estrangement from the Roman Catholic church. Original.

The Tudors

Derek Wilson, The Uncrowned Kings of England: The Black Legend of the Dudleys (Robison 2005) pp. 189–91, 201–4; D. McCulloch, Thomas Cranmer (Yale UP 1996) ...

The Tudors

Continuing his exploration of the pathways of British history, Timothy Venning examines the turning points of the Tudor period, though he also strays over into the early Stuart period. As always, he discusses the crucial junctions at which History could easily have taken a different turn and analyses the possible and likely results. While necessarily speculative to a degree, the scenarios are all highly plausible and rooted in a firm understanding of actually events and their context. In so doing, Timothy Venning gives the reader a clearer understanding of the factors at play and why things happened the way they did, as well as a tantalizing view of what might so easily have been different. Key scenarios discussed in this volume include: Did the pretenders Lambert Simnel and Perkin Warbeck ever have a realistic chance of a successful invsasion/coup? If Henry Fitzroy, Henry VIII's illegitimate son, had not died young, might he have been a suitable King or at least Regent on the King's death? What if Edward VI had not died at 15 but reigned into the 1560s and 70s? How might the Spanish Armada have succeeded in landing an army in England, and with what likely outcome?

Midwifery from the Tudors to the 21st Century

John Hatcher, The Black Death: The Intimate Story of a Village in Crisis 1345–50 (London: Phoenix, 2008). 3 Elizabeth Burton, The Early Tudors at Home ...

Midwifery from the Tudors to the 21st Century

This book recounts the journey of English midwives over six centuries and their battle for survival as a discrete profession, caring safely for childbearing women. With a particular focus on sixteenth and twentieth century midwifery practice, it includes new research which provides evidence of the identity, social status, lives, families and practice of contemporary midwives, and argues that the excellent care given by ecclesiastically licensed midwives in Tudor England was not bettered until the twentieth century. Relying on a wide variety of archived and personally collected material, this history illuminates the lives, words, professional experiences and outcomes of midwives. It explores the place of women in society, the development of midwifery education and regulation, the seventeenth century arrival of the accoucheurs and the continuing drive by obstetricians to medicalise birth. A fascinating and compelling read, it highlights the politics and challenges that have shaped midwifery practice today and encourages readers to be confident in midwifery-led care and giving women choices in childbirth. It is an important read for all those interested in childbirth.

The Biscuit

35 Kaufmann, Black Tudors, p.153. 36 Fury, Tides in the Affairs of Men, p.139. 37 Robertson, 'Mariner's mealtimes', p.26. 38 Shakespeare, As You Like It, ...

The Biscuit

'Fascinating' - Prue Leith Bourbons. Custard Creams. Rich Tea. Jammie Dodgers. Chocolate Digestives. Shortbread. Ginger snaps. Which is your favourite? British people eat more biscuits than any other nation; they are as embedded in our culture as fish and chips or the Sunday roast. But biscuits are not only tasty treats to go with a cup of tea, the sustenance they afford is often emotional, evoking nostalgic memories of childhood. Lizzie Collingham begins in Roman times when biscuits - literally, 'twice-baked' bread - became the staple of the poor; she takes us to the Middle East, where the addition of sugar to the dough created the art of confectionery. Yet it was in Britain that bakers experimented to create the huge variety of biscuits which populate our world today. And when the Industrial Revolution led to their mass production, biscuits became integral to the British diet. We follow the humble biscuit's transformation from durable staple for sailors, explorers and colonists to sweet luxury for the middling classes to comfort food for an entire nation. Like an assorted tin of biscuits, this charming and beautifully illustrated book has something to offer for everyone, combining recipes for hardtack and macaroons, Shrewsbury biscuits and Garibaldis, with entertaining and eye-opening vignettes of social history.

Tudors Facts Jokes

... became more common , some rich Tudors grew so fond of sweet food that their teeth rotted or went black . Black teeth were a sign you were successful !

Tudors Facts   Jokes

Truly Foul & Cheesy is a bestselling series of hilarious, fact-packed information books that will have young readers laughing as they’re learning. Quirky illustrations and bite-sized text provide an accessible and entertaining introduction to the Tudor period, including its ruthless rulers, like Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, disgusting diseases, filthy theatres and ghastliest causes of death. Hold onto your sides and dive in!

Horrible Histories Terrible Tudors

Terrible. Tudor. witches. Black. catsand. broomsticks ... The Tudors, though, thought that witcheswerecapableof anything. And unfortunately for the ...

Horrible Histories  Terrible Tudors

The Terrible Tudors weren't just terrible. They were a heck of a horrible bunch! What with Henry VIII and his unlucky wives, and beastly Queen Bess and her slaughtered suitors, even the Tudor kings and queens were royally rotten! So find out...*' Why Henry VIII thought he'd married a horse * Which terrible torture methods the twisted Tudors used * Which shocking swear words they simply loved to say * How an awful Tudor axeman kept botching the job * What foul food the Tudors ate Plus there are bloody beheadings, a mysterious murder, lots of curious quizzes and some gruesome games. History just doesn't get more horrible!