Body Nation and Narrative in the Americas

This book contextualizes 21st century representations of disappearance, torture, and detention within a historical framework of inter-American narratives.

Body  Nation  and Narrative in the Americas

This book contextualizes 21st century representations of disappearance, torture, and detention within a historical framework of inter-American narratives. Examining a range of sources, Pitt finds a persistent focus on the body that links contemporary practices of political terror to concerns about corporality and sovereignty.

Body Nation and Narrative in the Americas

regime is tied to its domination of each individual body under its control. Body, Nation, and Narrative in the Americas is not an attempt to read all the ...

Body  Nation  and Narrative in the Americas

This book contextualizes 21st century representations of disappearance, torture, and detention within a historical framework of inter-American narratives. Examining a range of sources, Pitt finds a persistent focus on the body that links contemporary practices of political terror to concerns about corporality and sovereignty.

Body and Nation

The conclusion of Pitt, Body, Nation, and Narrative in the Americas focuses on issues of bodies that are “disappeared.” Casper and Moore, Missing Bodies ...

Body and Nation

Body and Nation interrogates the connections among the body, the nation, and the world in twentieth-century U.S. history. The idea that bodies and bodily characteristics are heavily freighted with values that are often linked to political and social spheres remains underdeveloped in the histories of America's relations with the rest of the world. Attentive to diverse state and nonstate actors, the contributors provide historically grounded insights into the transnational dimensions of biopolitics. Their subjects range from the regulation of prostitution in the Philippines by the U.S. Army to Cold War ideals of American feminine beauty, and from "body counts" as metrics of military success to cultural representations of Mexican migrants in the United States as public health threats. By considering bodies as complex, fluctuating, and interrelated sites of meaning, the contributors to this collection offer new insights into the workings of both soft and hard power. Contributors. Frank Costigliola, Janet M. Davis, Shanon Fitzpatrick, Paul A. Kramer, Shirley Jennifer Lim, Mary Ting Yi Lui, Natalia Molina, Brenda Gayle Plummer, Emily S. Rosenberg, Kristina Shull, Annessa C. Stagner, Marilyn B. Young

African American Review

Martine's fascination with the ideal body is not just its diametrical form but
includes the body's appearance . ... While Neti employs menstrual blood as the
theme of protest in her article , Danticat's narrative involves all forms of female
bodily flows , tho she considers the flow of blood to be above all others . ...
Producing the Mothers of the Nation : Race , Class and Contemporary U.S.
Population Policies .

African American Review


Women s Narratives of the Early Americas and the Formation of Empire

body politic is fostered by democratic systems because of the belatedness that ... In other words, the nation is performatively spoken into being only after ...

Women   s Narratives of the Early Americas and the Formation of Empire

The essays in this collection examine the connections between the forces of empire and women's lives in the early Americas, in particular the ways their narratives contributed to empire formation. Focusing on the female body as a site of contestation, the essays describe acts of bravery, subversion, and survival expressed in a variety of genres, including the saga, letter, diary, captivity narrative, travel narrative, verse, sentimental novel, and autobiography. The volume also speaks to a range of female experience, across the Americas and across time, from the Viking exploration to early nineteenth-century United States, challenging scholars to reflect on the implications of early American literature even to the present day.

Determinations

Determinations is both an uncompromising Marxian engagement with an erstwhile 'postcolonial theory' and a set of new critical readings of a body of 'postcolonial' narratives, mainly Latin American.

Determinations

Determinations is both an uncompromising Marxian engagement with an erstwhile 'postcolonial theory' and a set of new critical readings of a body of 'postcolonial' narratives, mainly Latin American. Its central propositions are twofold: first, that the national question, however its terms have changed, is the still under-theorized and unresolved problem that haunts the hyper-abstractions and mystifications of postcolonial theory and other ideological flights into 'globalization'; second, that the important insight into the close cultural link between 'nation' and 'narration' must be carried further so as to disclose their concretely historical, fully determinate relationship. In essays that first engage the current theoretical parlances of 'ambivalence', 'hybridity' and the 'subaltern', and that go on to flesh out an alternative 'political narratology' through readings of Cortazar, Carpentier, Garcia Marquez, Rulfo and Vargas Llosa, Larsen concludes with a critical reassessment of Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities. In place of the cultural essentializing of third-worldisms and of the indeterminacies of Bhabhaite or Spivakian textualism, Determinations develops a dialectical, radically historicized account of the national and the colonial as literary and cultural mediations.

Literary and Cultural Relations between Brazil and Mexico

Among them are Earl Fitz's Rediscovering theNew World, Kristin Pitt's Body, Nation, and Narrative in the Americas,Rudyard Alcocer'sTime Travel in theLatin ...

Literary and Cultural Relations between Brazil and Mexico

Joining a timely conversation within the field of intra-American literature, this study takes a fresh look at Latin America by locating fragments and making evident the mostly untold story of horizontal (south-south) contacts across a multilingual, multicultural continent.

The New Cambridge Companion to William Faulkner

... Body, Nation, and Narrative in the Americas (London: Palgrave Macmillan, ... American Creoles: The Francophone Caribbean and the American South ...

The New Cambridge Companion to William Faulkner

The New Cambridge Companion to William Faulkner offers contemporary readers a sample of innovative approaches to interpreting and appreciating William Faulkner, who continues to inspire passionate readership worldwide. The essays here address a variety of topics in Faulkner's fiction, such as its reflection of the concurrent emergence of cinema, social inequality and rights movements, modern ways of imagining sexual identity and behavior, the South's history as a plantation economy and society, and the persistent effects of traumatic cultural and personal experience. This new Companion provides an introduction to the fresh ways Faulkner is being read in the twenty-first century, and bears witness to his continued importance as an American and world writer.

Fat Talk Nation

In Fat-Talk Nation, Susan Greenhalgh tells the story of today’s fight against excess pounds by giving young people, the campaign’s main target, an opportunity to speak about experiences that have long lain hidden in silence and shame.

Fat Talk Nation

In recent decades, America has been waging a veritable war on fat in which not just public health authorities, but every sector of society is engaged in constant "fat talk" aimed at educating, badgering, and ridiculing heavy people into shedding pounds. We hear a great deal about the dangers of fatness to the nation, but little about the dangers of today’s epidemic of fat talk to individuals and society at large. The human trauma caused by the war on fat is disturbing—and it is virtually unknown. How do those who do not fit the "ideal" body type feel being the object of abuse, discrimination, and even revulsion? How do people feel being told they are a burden on the healthcare system for having a BMI outside what is deemed—with little solid scientific evidence—"healthy"? How do young people, already prone to self-doubt about their bodies, withstand the daily assault on their body type and sense of self-worth? In Fat-Talk Nation, Susan Greenhalgh tells the story of today’s fight against excess pounds by giving young people, the campaign’s main target, an opportunity to speak about experiences that have long lain hidden in silence and shame. Featuring forty-five autobiographical narratives of personal struggles with diet, weight, "bad BMIs," and eating disorders, Fat-Talk Nation shows how the war on fat has produced a generation of young people who are obsessed with their bodies and whose most fundamental sense of self comes from their size. It reveals that regardless of their weight, many people feel miserable about their bodies, and almost no one is able to lose weight and keep it off. Greenhalgh argues that attempts to rescue America from obesity-induced national decline are damaging the bodily and emotional health of young people and disrupting families and intimate relationships. Fatness today is not primarily about health, Greenhalgh asserts; more fundamentally, it is about morality and political inclusion/exclusion or citizenship. To unpack the complexity of fat politics today, Greenhalgh introduces a cluster of terms—biocitizen, biomyth, biopedagogy, bioabuse, biocop, and fat personhood—and shows how they work together to produce such deep investments in the attainment of the thin, fit body. These concepts, which constitute a theory of the workings of our biocitizenship culture, offer powerful tools for understanding how obesity has come to remake who we are as a nation, and how we might work to reverse course for the next generation.

An American Body Politic

Cotton Mather: First Significant Figure in American Medicine. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University ... Bhabha, Homi K. “Introduction: Narrating the Nation.

An American Body   Politic

A reflection on the metaphor of the body politic throughout American history

Re membering the Body

Re membering the Body


The Immigrant Food Nexus

"This book investigates the intersection of food and immigration in North America through a novel construct: the immigrant-food nexus.

The Immigrant Food Nexus

"This book investigates the intersection of food and immigration in North America through a novel construct: the immigrant-food nexus. To do this, the book's chapters delve into three overarching areas in which immigration and food intersect from the national level down to the daily lived experience of immigrants: Boundaries: Individuals, Communities, and Nations, Labor: Fields and Bodies, and Identity Narratives and Identity Politics. In taking a critical approach towards questions of food, agricultural and immigration policy, the volume's contributors ask: How can the immigrant-food nexus be understood in our current political climate of rising nationalism, and how does an analysis that transcends traditional "micro" or "macro" scales from the nation to the community to the body provide a new way to think about these issues? The contributors synthesize this analysis of "macro" topics within immigration and food with a "micro" analysis of immigrant foodways. Foodways are manifestations and symbols of cultural histories and proclivities. As individuals participate in culturally defined ways of eating, they perform their own identities and memberships in particular groups. How important are foodways as performances, on immigrant lived and daily practices? The concepts defined as "macro" have real, embodied consequences. The concepts defined as "micro" have large-scale, important meanings. The contributors recognize this: their work bridges the scales of the nation, community, and individual bodies to "render visible the political tensions about race, agriculture, immigration, and the future of the nation that simmer in everyday life" (Neubert, Chapter 2). Through critical, multidimensional research, critical food and immigration scholars today find themselves at a generative place to bring fact-based, humanized, and multi-scalar narratives of the immigrant-food nexus to light. The uniqueness of this book lies in the concept of the immigrant-food nexus as a lens for exploring immigration and food in North America. This fulfills a special need: to complicate the binary of macro level policy, and micro level lived experience, showing the intersections between these scales"--

Imaging Japanese America

The Visual Construction of Citizenship, Nation, and the Body Elena Tajima Creef. and video, museum exhibitions, and multimedia and literary representations.

Imaging Japanese America

As we have been reminded by the renewed acceptance of racial profiling, and the detention and deportation of hundreds of immigrants of Arab and Muslim descent on unknown charges following September 11, in times of national crisis we take refuge in the visual construction of citizenship in order to imagine ourselves as part of a larger, cohesive national American community. Beginning with another moment of national historical trauma—December 7, 1941 and the subsequent internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans—Imaging Japanese America unearths stunning and seldom seen photographs of Japanese Americans by the likes of Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Toyo Mitatake. In turn, Elena Tajima Creef examines the perspective from inside, as visualized by Mine Okubo's Maus-like dramatic cartoon and by films made by Asian Americans about the internment experience. She then traces the ways in which contemporary representations of Japanese Americans in popular culture are inflected by the politics of historical memory from World War II. Creef closes with a look at the representation of the multiracial Japanese American body at the turn of the millennium.

Abusing Religion

SEXING THE AMERICAN BODY POLITIC But contraceptive nationalist narratives do more than garner sympathy ... defensible borders of the white, Anglo nation.

Abusing Religion

Sex abuse happens in all communities, but American minority religions often face disproportionate allegations of sexual abuse. Why, in a country that consistently fails to acknowledge—much less address—the sexual abuse of women and children, do American religious outsiders so often face allegations of sexual misconduct? Why does the American public presume to know “what’s really going on” in minority religious communities? Why are sex abuse allegations such an effective way to discredit people on America’s religious margins? What makes Americans so willing, so eager to identify religion as the cause of sex abuse? Abusing Religion argues that sex abuse in minority religious communities is an American problem, not (merely) a religious one.

Embodied Land

Embodied Land


American Revenge Narratives

By surveying American revenge narratives, this book measures how contemporary payback plots appraise the nation’s political, social, and economic inequities.

American Revenge Narratives

American Revenge Narratives critically examines the nation’s vengeful storytelling tradition. With essays on late twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, film, and television, it maps the coordinates of the revenge genre’s contemporary reinvention across American culture. By surveying American revenge narratives, this book measures how contemporary payback plots appraise the nation’s political, social, and economic inequities. The volume’s essays collectively make the case that retribution is a defining theme of post-war American culture and an artistic vehicle for critique. In another sense, this book presents a scholarly coming to terms with the nation’s love for vengeance. By investigating recent iterations of an ancient genre, contributors explore how the revenge narrative evolves and thrives within American literary and filmic imagination. Taken together, the book’s diverse chapters attempt to understand American culture’s seemingly inexhaustible production of vengeful tales.

American Road Narratives

designation of “Arab nationals” suggests, those concerns are directed at the scales of both body and nation, often collapsing the two.

American Road Narratives

The freedom to go anywhere and become anyone has profoundly shaped our national psyche. Transforming our sense of place and identity--whether in terms of social and economic status, or race and ethnicity, or gender and sexuality—American mobility is perhaps nowhere more vividly captured than in the image of the open road. From pioneer trails to the latest car commercial, the road looms large as a form of expansiveness and opportunity. Too often it is the celebratory idea of the road as a free-floating zone moving the traveler beyond the typical concerns of space and time that dominates the discussion. Rather than thinking of mobility as an escape from cultural tensions, however, Ann Brigham proposes that we understand mobility as a mode of engagement with them. She explores the genre of road narratives to show how mobility both thrives on and attempts to manage shifting conflicts about space and society in the United States. From the earliest transcontinental automobile narratives from the 1910s, through classics like Jack Kerouac's On the Road and the film Thelma & Louise, up to post-9/11 narratives, Brigham traces the ways in which mobility has been imagined, created, and interrogated over the past century and shows how mobility promises, and threatens, to incorporate the outsider and to blur boundaries. Bringing together textual and cultural analysis, theories of spatiality, and sociohistorical frameworks, this book offers an invigoratingly different view of mobility and a new understanding of the road narrative’s importance in American culture. Choice Outstanding Academic Title from American Library Association

Fleshing Out America

Covering topics from representation, spectatorship, and essentialism to difference, power, and authority, Carolyn Sorisio places these writers' works in historical context and in relation to contemporary theories of corporeality.

Fleshing Out America

Can we work through the imaginative space of literature to combat the divisive nature of the politics of the body? That is the central question asked of the writings Carolyn Sorisio investigates in Fleshing Out America. The first half of the nineteenth century ushered in an era of powerful scientific and quasi-scientific disciplines that assumed innate differences between the "types" of humankind. Some proponents of slavery and Indian Removal, as well as opponents of women's rights, supplanted the Declaration of Independence's higher law of inborn equality with a new set of "laws" proclaiming the physical inferiority of women, "Negroes," and "Aboriginals." Fleshing Out America explores the representation of the body in the work of seven authors, all of whom were involved with their era's reform movements: Lydia Maria Child, Frances E. W. Harper, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Walt Whitman, Harriet Jacobs, and Martin R. Delany. For such American writers, who connected the individual body symbolically with the body politic, the new science was fraught with possibility and peril. Covering topics from representation, spectatorship, and essentialism to difference, power, and authority, Carolyn Sorisio places these writers' works in historical context and in relation to contemporary theories of corporeality. She shows how these authors struggled, in diverse and divergent ways, to flesh out America--to define, even defend, the nation's body in a tumultuous period. Drawing on Euro- and African American authors of both genders who are notable for their aesthetic and political differences, Fleshing Out America demonstrates the surprisingly diverse literary conversation taking place as American authors attempted to reshape the politics of the body, which shaped the politics of the time.

Asian Law Journal

To demonstrate how this narrative framework would work , Chang presents a
narrative account of Asian America's historical ... and points to the importance of
retaining identity if Asian America is to be included within the nation's boundaries
. ... that mandates racial and ethnic diversity in student bodies and sets for each “
magnet ” school a forty - percent cap for students from any racial or ethnic group .

Asian Law Journal


Imaging Japanese America

Creef looks at racial profiling Asian Americans over the past 100 years by examining images by well known photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams.

Imaging Japanese America

Creef looks at racial profiling Asian Americans over the past 100 years by examining images by well known photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams.