A Series of Unfortunate Events #5: The Austere Academy

A Series of Unfortunate Events #5: The Austere Academy

NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES As the three Baudelaire orphans warily approach their new home Prufrock Preparatory School, they can't help but notice the enormous stone arch bearing the school's motto Memento Mori or "Remember you will die." This is not a cheerful greeting and certainly marks an inauspicious beginning to a very bleak story just as we have come to expect from Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, the deliciously morbid set of books that began with The Bad Beginning and only got worse.

Charles Dickens and the Victorian Child

Romanticizing and Socializing the Imperfect Child

Charles Dickens and the Victorian Child

This book explores the ideas of children and childhood, and the construct of the 'ideal' Victorian child, that developed rapidly over the Victorian era along with literacy and reading material for the emerging mass reading public. Children's Literature was one of the developing areas for publishers and readers alike, yet this did not stop the reading public from bringing home works not expressly intended for children and reading to their family. Within the idealized middle class family circle, authors such as Charles Dickens were read and appreciated by members of all ages. By examining some of Dickens's works that contain the imperfect child, and placing them alongside works by Kingsley, MacDonald, Stretton, Rossetti, and Nesbit, Malkovich considers the construction, romanticization, and socialization of the Victorian child within work read by and for children during the Victorian Era and early Edwardian period. These authors use elements of religion, death, irony, fairy worlds, gender, and class to illustrate the need for the ideal child and yet the impossibility of such a construct. Malkovich contends that the 'imperfect' child more readily reflects reality, whereas the 'ideal' child reflects an unattainable fantasy and while debates rage over how to define children's literature, such children, though somewhat changed, can still be found in the most popular of literatures read by children contemporarily.

Crossing Textual Boundaries in International Children’s Literature

Crossing Textual Boundaries in International Children’s Literature

“As the first part of the title indicates, my interest in looking at intertextuality and transformation still maintains a prominent place throughout this book as well. If we believe that ‘no text is an island,’ then we will understand that the relationships between and within texts across the years become a fascinating place for academic inquiry. I included the word ‘boundaries’ into the title because we never get tired of voicing our opinions about texts which traverse relegated boundaries, such as genre or medium. Not only am I interested in discussing what these changes across boundaries mean socially, historically, and culturally, but also what they mean geographically, which accounts for the second part of my title. “I am very excited that this book will be placing even more emphasis on children’s literature in an international scene than my first book did, in the sense that I have added more scholars on an international level. I hesitate to list the nationalities of all of the contributors here because quite a few have themselves crossed international boundaries in different ways, by either studying abroad or finding permanent residency in foreign countries. Nevertheless, the writers have lived extensively in or identify as being from Australia, Canada, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, the United States of America, and Wales.” —Introduction

Northern Lights

Translation in the Nordic Countries

Northern Lights

This volume is a collection of essays based on papers given at the Nordic Translation Conference, which took place in London in March 2008. The purpose of the collection is twofold. First, it serves to place the Nordic languages firmly into the field of translation studies, where hitherto little research has focused on the Nordic region; the essays include many Nordic-specific studies and ideas. Second, the book presents research and conclusions which are relevant to translation studies in all languages and cultures. Therefore this volume, which covers a wide range of Nordic languages and both literary and non-literary topics, is unambiguously pertinent to the Nordic countries while also being universally valuable.

Names and Naming in Young Adult Literature

Names and Naming in Young Adult Literature

Names and Naming in Young Adult Literature shows how authors of young adult literature use the creation of names for people, places, events, inventions, animals, and imaginary concepts as one of their most important literary techniques.

A Field Guide to the Classroom Library

A Field Guide to the Classroom Library

Noted teacher/author Lucy Calkins and a team from The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project Community have created the most comprehensive and accessible leveled lists and guides for nearly 1,200 children's trade books.

Children's Literature Review, Volume 128

Excerpts from Reviews, Criticism, and Commentary on Books for Children and Young People

Children's Literature Review, Volume 128

Covers writers and illustrators for children and young adults. Entries consist of listings of major works, awards, and critical excerpts from significant reviews and commentaries on the author's or artist's works.