Bowling Alone Revised and Updated

In the revised edition of his classic work, Putnam shows how our shrinking access to the “social capital” that is the reward of communal activity and community sharing still poses a serious threat to our civic and personal health, and ...

Bowling Alone  Revised and Updated

Updated to include a new chapter about the influence of social media and the Internet—the 20th anniversary edition of Bowling Alone remains a seminal work of social analysis, and its examination of what happened to our sense of community remains more relevant than ever in today’s fractured America. Twenty years, ago, Robert D. Putnam made a seemingly simple observation: once we bowled in leagues, usually after work; but no longer. This seemingly small phenomenon symbolized a significant social change that became the basis of the acclaimed bestseller, Bowling Alone, which The Washington Post called “a very important book” and Putnam, “the de Tocqueville of our generation.” Bowling Alone surveyed in detail Americans’ changing behavior over the decades, showing how we had become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and social structures, whether it’s with the PTA, church, clubs, political parties, or bowling leagues. In the revised edition of his classic work, Putnam shows how our shrinking access to the “social capital” that is the reward of communal activity and community sharing still poses a serious threat to our civic and personal health, and how these consequences have a new resonance for our divided country today. He includes critical new material on the pervasive influence of social media and the internet, which has introduced previously unthinkable opportunities for social connection—as well as unprecedented levels of alienation and isolation. At the time of its publication, Putnam’s then-groundbreaking work showed how social bonds are the most powerful predictor of life satisfaction, and how the loss of social capital is felt in critical ways, acting as a strong predictor of crime rates and other measures of neighborhood quality of life, and affecting our health in other ways. While the ways in which we connect, or become disconnected, have changed over the decades, his central argument remains as powerful and urgent as ever: mending our frayed social capital is key to preserving the very fabric of our society.

Bowling Alone

Shows how changes in work, family structure, age, women's roles, and other factors have caused people to become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and democratic structures--and how they may reconnect.

Bowling Alone

Shows how changes in work, family structure, age, women's roles, and other factors have caused people to become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and democratic structures--and how they may reconnect.

Democracy Social Justice and the American Community College

Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons in Theory and Practice, rev. and updated ed. Basic Books. Kimmerer, Robin Wall. ... Belknap Press. Putnam, Robert. 2020. Bowling Alone: Revised and Updated: The Collapse 2 41 GRATITUDE Bibliography.

Democracy  Social Justice  and the American Community College

This book provides scholars, educators, and legislators with a personal, classroom-level tour of daily life at a community college. Readers will accompany the author into the classroom as he goes about his work as an English teacher meeting with classes and corresponding with students on Blackboard and e-mail. Answering the call for ”student-centered scholarship,” this book blends traditional academic writing with chapters that feature a rich variety of student work, including essays, journal entries, poems, art, and responses to creative assignments. In this volume, Sullivan theorizes the modern community college as a social justice institution. By mission and mandate, the modern community college has democratized America’s system of higher education and distributed hope, equity, and opportunity more broadly across the nation.

Drivers of Trust in Public Institutions in Finland

[57] Putnam, R. (2020), Bowling Alone: Revised and Updated: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Simon and Schuster Paperbacks, New York, NY. [10] Rainio-Niemi, J. (2019), “Managing fragile democracy: Constitutionalist ethos ...

Drivers of Trust in Public Institutions in Finland

Public trust is a cornerstone of the Finnish administrative and political model, it has also been a key element of Finland's successful response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Preserving and strengthening the Finnish trust capital will be of essence for facing trade-offs and challenges ahead, particularly on the recovery phase following the pandemic.

Recovering Abundance

15 Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Revised & Updated (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001), 204.↵ 16 Ronald Eller, Uneven Ground: Appalachia Since 1945 (Lexington: University Press of ...

Recovering Abundance

Recovering Abundance: Twelve Practices for Small-Town Leaders invites readers to live a new story--to join a movement of renewal for small towns and rural communities. Andy Stanton-Henry provides twelve civic-spiritual practices, rooted in Jesus's miracle among the multitude, that rural and small-town leaders can use to renew their congregations and communities. Each chapter explores how one practice was demonstrated in the story, has been embodied in small-town and rural leaders and communities, and can be applied today. Through these twelve practices, Stanton-Henry helps readers tune in to an alternative story, one he discovered in his own rural Ohio community. Yes, he saw the commonly lamented decline and devastation that have brought suffering to rural Americans and that seem to foster resentment and despair. However, as he dug deeper into the stories of his neighbors, he began to notice that small towns and rural regions are working. They are working to build inclusive, thriving, local economies, to weave a welcoming social fabric in their region, to cocreate a positive future--following the practices he explores in this book. Recovering Abundance is a new story about the agency and creativity of what Stanton-Henry calls "ordinary leaders," not a story about scarcity and deprivation but one of abundance and generosity.

The sketch book

The sketch book


Networked

Robert Putnam , Bowling Alone ( New York : Simon & Schuster , 2000 ) ; Sidney Tarrow , Power in Movement , updated and revised ed . ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2011 ) ; Beth Kanter and Allison Fine , The Networked ...

Networked

How social networks, the personalized Internet, and always-on mobile connectivity are transforming—and expanding—social life. Daily life is connected life, its rhythms driven by endless email pings and responses, the chimes and beeps of continually arriving text messages, tweets and retweets, Facebook updates, pictures and videos to post and discuss. Our perpetual connectedness gives us endless opportunities to be part of the give-and-take of networking. Some worry that this new environment makes us isolated and lonely. But in Networked, Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman show how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of “networked individualism” liberates us from the restrictions of tightly knit groups; it also requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. Rainie and Wellman outline the “triple revolution” that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, they examine how the move to networked individualism has expanded personal relationships beyond households and neighborhoods; transformed work into less hierarchical, more team-driven enterprises; encouraged individuals to create and share content; and changed the way people obtain information. Rainie and Wellman guide us through the challenges and opportunities of living in the evolving world of networked individuals.

PEAK

How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow Revised and Updated Chip Conley ... If Harvard's Robert Putnam is correctin his “Bowling Alone” (an essay and book) theory of social isolation, then it's up to the corporate world to help ...

PEAK

Proven principles for sustainable success, with new leadership insight PEAK is the popular, transformative guide to doing business better, written by a seasoned entrepreneur/CEO who has disrupted his favorite industry not once, but twice. Author Chip Conley, founder and former CEO of one of the world’s largest boutique hotel companies, turned to psychologist Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs at a time when his company was in dire need. And years later, when the young founders of Airbnb asked him to help turn their start-up home sharing company into a world-class hospitality giant, Conley once again used the principles he’d developed in PEAK. In the decade since this book's first edition, Conley's PEAK strategy has been developed on six continents in organizations in virtually every industry. The author’s foundational premise is that great leaders become amateur psychologists by understanding the unique needs of three key relationships—with employees, customers, and investors—and this message has resonated with every kind of leader and company including some of the world’s best-known, from Apple to Facebook. Avid users of PEAK have found that the principles create greater loyalty and differentiation with their key stakeholders. This new second edition includes in-depth examples of real-world PEAK companies, including the author’s own at Airbnb, and exclusive PEAK leadership practices that will take you—and your company's performance—to new heights. Whether you're at a startup or a Fortune 500 company, at a for-profit, nonprofit, or governmental organization, this book can help you and your people reach potential you never realized you had. Understand how Maslow's hierarchy makes for winning business practices Learn how PEAK drove some of today's top businesses to success Help employees reach their full potential—and beyond Transform the customer experience and keep investors happy The PEAK framework succeeds because it elevates the business from the inside out. These same principles apply in the boardroom, the breakroom, and your living room at home, and have proven to be the foundation of healthy, fulfilled lives. Even if you think you're doing great, you could always be doing better—and PEAK gives you a roadmap to the next level.

Middle Class Lifeboat

LEARN MORE Background Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Renewal of American Communities, Robert. ... Complete Do-It-Yourself Manual: Completely Revised and Updated, Family Handyman Magazine Editors, Readers Digest, 2007.

Middle Class Lifeboat

A comprehensive guide to safeguard your livelihood, income, and standard of living through the ups and downs of any economy. Most Americans, no matter what their economic circumstances, identify themselves as middle class. A recent Gallup poll showed that 63% consider themselves upper-middle or middle class. And they are feeling burned out and squeezed, under pressure to bring home more and more money just to maintain their standard of living. Middle Class Lifeboat is an answer to that pressure, a comprehensive guide to living a more stress-free lifestyle. Part I: Safeguarding Your Livelihood: profiles the 53 best jobs to have to be self- sufficient whether the economy is up or down. Part II: Safeguarding Your Income: 6 ways to extend your earnings, that don't always involve money. Part III : Safeguarding Your Standard of Living: 10 off-the-grid lifestyle choices to increase your quality of life

Image Bite Politics

Putnam, noted for his “bowling alone” thesis,48 initially asserted that the introduction of television into ... data that clearly showed the contribution of television news to political knowledge, Putnam revised his views considerably.

Image Bite Politics

Image Bite Politics is the first book to systematically assess the visual presentation of presidential candidates in network news coverage of elections and to connect these visual images with shifts in public opinion. Presenting the results of a comprehensive visual analysis of general election news from 1992-2004, encompassing four presidential campaigns, the authors highlight the remarkably potent influence of television images when it comes to evaluating leaders. The book draws from a variety of disciplines, including political science, behavioral biology, cognitive neuroscience, and media studies, to investigate the visual framing of elections in an incisive, fresh, and interdisciplinary fashion. Moreover, the book presents findings that are counterintuitive and challenge widely held assumptions--yet are supported by systematic data. For example, Republicans receive consistently more favorable visual treatment than Democrats, countering the conventional wisdom of a "liberal media bias"; and image bites are more prevalent, and in some elections more potent, in shaping voter opinions of candidates than sound bites. Finally, the authors provide a foundation for promoting visual literacy among news audiences and bring the importance of visual analysis to the forefront of research.

Depoliticizing Development

The new Bowling Alone is consequently largely a 'restatement', not a 'revised statement', providing massive statistical ... Reading Bowling Alone, said a reviewer in The W/ashington Post, is 'like sipping sociology from a fire hose'.

Depoliticizing Development

The idea of social capital – meaning, most simply put, 'social connections' – was unheard of outside a small circle of sociologists until very recently. Now, it is proclaimed by the World Bank to be the 'missing link' in international development and has become the subject of a flurry of books and research papers. Harriss asks why this notion should have taken off in the dramatic way that it has done and finds in its uses by the World Bank the attempt, systematically, to obscure class relations and power.

The City Reader

The plate sections have been revised and updated. ... We find that our students are excited by Robert Putnam's ideas about declining social capital from “Bowling Alone,” David Harvey's writings about “The Right to the City” and Manuel ...

The City Reader

The sixth edition of the highly successful The City Reader juxtaposes the very best classic and contemporary writings on the city to provide the comprehensive mapping of the terrain of Urban Studies and Planning old and new. The City Reader is the anchor volume in the Routledge Urban Reader Series and is now integrated with all ten other titles in the series. This edition has been extensively updated and expanded to reflect the latest thinking in each of the disciplinary areas included and in topical areas such as compact cities, urban history, place making, sustainable urban development, globalization, cities and climate change, the world city network, the impact of technology on cities, resilient cities, cities in Africa and the Middle East, and urban theory. The new edition places greater emphasis on cities in the developing world, globalization and the global city system of the future. The plate sections have been revised and updated. Sixty generous selections are included: forty-four from the fifth edition, and sixteen new selections, including three newly written exclusively for The City Reader. The sixth edition keeps classic writings by authors such as Ebenezer Howard, Ernest W. Burgess, LeCorbusier, Lewis Mumford, Jane Jacobs, and Louis Wirth, as well as the best contemporary writings of, among others, Peter Hall, Manuel Castells, David Harvey, Saskia Sassen, and Kenneth Jackson. In addition to newly commissioned selections by Yasser Elshestawy, Peter Taylor, and Lawrence Vale, new selections in the sixth edition include writings by Aristotle, Peter Calthorpe, Alberto Camarillo, Filip DeBoech, Edward Glaeser, David Owen, Henri Pirenne, The Project for Public Spaces, Jonas Rabinovich and Joseph Lietman, Doug Saunders, and Bish Sanyal. The anthology features general and section introductions as well as individual introductions to the selected articles introducing the authors, providing context, relating the selection to other selection, and providing a bibliography for further study. The sixth edition includes fifty plates in four plate sections, substantially revised from the fifth edition.

Bored Lonely Angry Stupid

David Riesman, Nathan Glazer, and Reuel Denney, The Lonely Crowd, Revised Edition: A Study of the Changing American Character (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001), 307. 90. Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival ...

Bored  Lonely  Angry  Stupid

“Technologies have been shaping [our] emotional culture for more than a century, argue computer scientist Luke Fernandez and historian Susan Matt in this original study. Marshalling archival sources and interviews, they trace how norms (say, around loneliness) have shifted with technological change.” —Nature “A powerful story of how new forms of technology are continually integrated into the human experience...Anyone interested in seeing the digital age through a new perspective should be pleased with this rich account.” —Publishers Weekly Facebook makes us lonely. Selfies breed narcissism. On Twitter, hostility reigns. Pundits and psychologists warn that digital technologies substantially alter our emotional states, but in this lively look at our evolving feelings about technology since the advent of the telegraph, we learn that the gadgets we use don’t just affect how we feel—they can profoundly change our sense of self. When we say we’re bored, we don’t mean the same thing as a Victorian dandy. Could it be that political punditry has helped shape a new kind of anger? Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt take us back in time to consider how our feelings of loneliness, vanity, and anger have evolved in tandem with new technologies.

The Caribbeanization of Black Politics

Alejandro Portes and Ruben G. Rumbaut, Immigrant America: A Portrait, 3d ed., revised, expanded, and updated (Berkeley: University of ... Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community (New York: Simon Notes to Chapter 6 217.

The Caribbeanization of Black Politics

Examines the continuing ethnic diversification of black America and its impact on black political empowerment. In The Caribbeanization of Black Politics, Sharon D. Wright Austin explores the impact of ethnic diversification of African American communities on the prospects for black political empowerment. Focusing on Boston, Chicago, Miami, and New York City—cities that for the last several years have experienced an influx of black immigrants—she surveyed more than two thousand African Americans, Cape Verdeans, Haitians, and West Indians. Although many studies conclude that African American group consciousness causes them to participate in politics at higher rates when socioeconomic status is controlled for, Wright Austin analyzes whether this is true for other black groups. She assesses the current political incorporation of these groups by looking at data on public officeholders and by examining political coalitions and conflicts among the groups, and she also discusses the possible future of black political development in these cities. “The greatest contribution of this book is its analysis of black ethnics in a diverse geographic space. Moving beyond the New York City lens to Boston, Chicago, and Miami is something that has never been done in political science. This book is incredibly important.” — Christina M. Greer, author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream

The Oxford Handbook of Compassion Science

Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon and Schuster. ... Generation Me—Revised and Updated: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled—and More Miserable Than Ever Before.

The Oxford Handbook of Compassion Science

How do we define compassion? Is it an emotional state, a motivation, a dispositional trait, or a cultivated attitude? How does it compare to altruism and empathy? Chapters in this Handbook present critical scientific evidence about compassion in numerous conceptions. All of these approaches to thinking about compassion are valid and contribute importantly to understanding how we respond to others who are suffering. Covering multiple levels of our lives and self-concept, from the individual, to the group, to the organization and culture, The Oxford Handbook of Compassion Science gathers evidence and models of compassion that treat the subject of compassion science with careful scientific scrutiny and concern. It explores the motivators of compassion, the effect on physiology, the co-occurrence of wellbeing, and compassion training interventions. Sectioned by thematic approaches, it pulls together basic and clinical research ranging across neurobiological, developmental, evolutionary, social, clinical, and applied areas in psychology such as business and education. In this sense, it comprises one of the first multidisciplinary and systematic approaches to examining compassion from multiple perspectives and frames of reference. With contributions from well-established scholars as well as young rising stars in the field, this Handbook bridges a wide variety of diverse perspectives, research methodologies, and theory, and provides a foundation for this new and rapidly growing field. It should be of great value to the new generation of basic and applied researchers examining compassion, and serve as a catalyst for academic researchers and students to support and develop the modern world.

The Rational Bible Genesis

In Harvard professor Robert Putnam's 2000 book Bowling Alone, the author famously noted that in recent years fewer ... A decade later, Putnam revised his thesis, pointing out that what sociologists designate as “social capital” (the ...

The Rational Bible  Genesis

USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won’t after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager’s words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager’s forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.

The Lonely Nineties

The previous January, Robert Putnam published “Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital” in the Journal of ... Putnam revised some of his statistics and refined some of his arguments in an equally famous book, Bowling Alone: ...

The Lonely Nineties

This book examines the most popular American television shows of the nineties—a decade at the last gasp of network television’s cultural dominance. At a time when American culture seemed increasingly fragmented, television still offered something close to a site of national consensus. The Lonely Nineties focuses on a different set of popular nineties television shows in each chapter and provides an in-depth reading of scenes, characters or episodes that articulate the overarching “ideology” of each series. It ultimately argues that television shows such as Seinfeld, Friends, Law & Order and The Simpsons helped to shape the ways Americans thought about themselves in relation to their friends, families, localities, and nation. It demonstrates how these shows engaged with a variety of problems in American civic life, responded to the social isolation of the age, and occasionally imagined improvements for community in America.

The Free and the Virtuous

C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity: A Revised and Amplified Edition, with a New Introduction, of the Three Books Broadcast Talks, ... Robert D. Putnam, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, nachdr. ed.

The Free and the Virtuous

What did liberty mean to the American founding fathers? It was not just about limited government, protecting rights, and leaving people free to live their own definition of a good life. It was to be a movement toward the highest of human flourishing. A new genus of liberty had taken root here in the fresh American soil, and there was a special something—a moral discipline—that was inherent in the American character that would allow it to thrive. Above all, real liberty was dependent upon good character. The new nation had barely gotten any traction, however, when the founders’ ideal of a liberty based upon virtue began to lose its luster. Over time, liberty gradually became more about rights and less about the responsibility to be good. Character no longer matters, and we don’t seem to mourn the loss

Democracies in Flux

In Democracies in Flux, Putnam and nine world renowned scholars investigate the condition of social capital in eight advanced democratic nations.

Democracies in Flux

In Democracies in Flux, Putnam and nine world renowned scholars investigate the condition of social capital in eight advanced democratic nations.

Social Advantage and Disadvantage

'The Two Meanings of Social Capital'. Sociological Forum, 15(1): 1–12. Prandy, K. (1990). 'The Revised Cambridge Scale of Occupations'. Sociology, 24: 629–55. Putnam, R. D. (1995). 'Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital'.

Social Advantage and Disadvantage

Social advantage and disadvantage are potent catch-all terms. They have no established definition but, considered in relation to one another, they can embrace a wide variety of more specific concepts that address the ways in which human society causes, exacerbates or fails to prevent social divisions or injustices. This book captures the sense in which any conceptualisation of disadvantage is concerned with the consequences of processes by which relative advantage has been selectively conferred or attained. It considers how inequalities and social divisions are created as much by the concentration of advantage among the best-off as by the systematic disadvantage of the worst-off. The book critically discusses - from a global and a UK perspective - a spectrum of conceptual frameworks and ideas relating to poverty, social exclusion, capability deprivation, rights violations, social immobility, and human or social capital deficiency. It addresses advantage and disadvantage from a life course perspective through discussions of family and childhood, education, work, old age, and the dynamics of income and wealth. It considers cross-cutting divides that are implicated in the social construction and maintenance of advantage and disadvantage, including divisions premised on gender, 'race', ethnicity, migration and religion, neighbourhood and the experience of crime.