Brian de Palma s Split Screen

A biographical approach to the films of a controversial and provocative director

Brian de Palma s Split Screen

A biographical approach to the films of a controversial and provocative director

Brian De Palma s Split Screen

A splitdiopter shot uses a special lens so that the very close foreground on one side of the screen, along with the very far background on the other side, can both appear to be in focus ... Blumenfeld and Vachaud, Brian De Palma, 137.

Brian De Palma s Split Screen

Over the last five decades, the films of director Brian De Palma (b. 1940) have been among the biggest successes (The Untouchables, Mission: Impossible) and the most high-profile failures (The Bonfire of the Vanities) in Hollywood history. De Palma helped launch the careers of such prominent actors as Robert De Niro, John Travolta, and Sissy Spacek (who was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Actress in Carrie). Indeed Quentin Tarantino named Blow Out as one of his top three favorite films, praising De Palma as the best living American director. Picketed by feminists protesting its depictions of violence against women, Dressed to Kill helped to create the erotic thriller genre. Scarface, with its over-the-top performance by Al Pacino, remains a cult favorite. In the twenty-first century, De Palma has continued to experiment, incorporating elements from videogames (Femme Fatale), tabloid journalism (The Black Dahlia), YouTube, and Skype (Redacted and Passion) into his latest works. What makes De Palma such a maverick even when he is making Hollywood genre films? Why do his movies often feature megalomaniacs and failed heroes? Is he merely a misogynist and an imitator of Alfred Hitchcock? To answer these questions, author Douglas Keesey takes a biographical approach to De Palma's cinema, showing how De Palma reworks events from his own life into his films. Written in an accessible style, and including a chapter on every one of his films to date, this book is for anyone who wants to know more about De Palma's controversial films or who wants to better understand the man who made them.

Cinematography

This is the composition preferred by director Brian De Palma, the most ardent practitioner of split-screen in Hollywood. De Palma began using split-screen with Dionysus in '69 (1970, d.p. Brian De Palma), a filmed document ofa 1968 ...

Cinematography

How does a film come to look the way it does? And what influence does the look of a film have on our reaction to it? The role of cinematography, as both a science and an art, is often forgotten in the chatter about acting, directing, and budgets. The successful cinematographer must have a keen creative eye, as well as expert knowledge about the constantly expanding array of new camera, film, and lighting technologies. Without these skills at a director’s disposal, most movies quickly fade from memory. Cinematography focuses on the highlights of this art and provides the first comprehensive overview of how the field has rapidly evolved, from the early silent film era to the digital imagery of today. The essays in this volume introduce us to the visual conventions of the Hollywood style, explaining how these first arose and how they have subsequently been challenged by alternative aesthetics. In order to frame this fascinating history, the contributors employ a series of questions about technology (how did new technology shape cinematography?), authorship (can a cinematographer develop styles and themes over the course of a career?), and classicism (how should cinematographers use new technology in light of past practice?). Taking us from the hand-cranked cameras of the silent era to the digital devices used today, the collection of original essays explores how the art of cinematography has been influenced not only by technological advances, but also by trends in the movie industry, from the rise of big-budget blockbusters to the spread of indie films. The book also reveals the people behind the camera, profiling numerous acclaimed cinematographers from James Wong Howe to Roger Deakins. Lavishly illustrated with over 50 indelible images from landmark films, Cinematography offers a provocative behind-the-scenes look at the profession and a stirring celebration of the art form. Anyone who reads this history will come away with a fresh eye for what appears on the screen because of what happens behind it.

Dark Dreams 2 0

... and (5) a split screen with imagery specifically evoking Brian De Palma's Sisters, also about female madness. her body to bleed. (Here, her film seems to reference the work of David Cronenberg, particularly Crash.) ...

Dark Dreams 2 0

Greatly expanded and updated from the 1977 original, this new edition explores the evolution of the modern horror film, particularly as it reflects anxieties associated with the atomic bomb, the Cold War, 1960s violence, sexual liberation, the Reagan revolution, 9/11 and the Iraq War. It divides modern horror into three varieties (psychological, demonic and apocalyptic) and demonstrates how horror cinema represents the popular expression of everyday fears while revealing the forces that influence American ideological and political values. Directors given a close reading include Alfred Hitchcock, Brian De Palma, David Cronenberg, Guillermo Del Toro, Michael Haneke, Robert Aldrich, Mel Gibson and George A. Romero. Additional material discusses postmodern remakes, horror franchises and Asian millennial horror. This book also contains more than 950 frame grabs and a very extensive filmography.

The Suspense of Horror and the Horror of Suspense

402 Brian De Palma explains his usage of the split screen and its success liNe this: I felt destruction had to be shown in splitYscreen, because how many times could you cut from Carrie to things moving around? [.

The Suspense of Horror and the Horror of Suspense

This book presents a detailed academic study of suspense building in Stephen King’s horror novels The Shining and Carrie and their respective film adaptations. Two film versions of each book are taken into consideration – one released immediately after the novel publication and one that appeared decades later. After providing a general idea of what suspense as a phenomenon related to fiction is, the study establishes some repeated plot-bound suspense motifs and episodes in the literary works, and traces their development in the films in order to demonstrate the similarities and differences in the techniques of achieving suspense in literature and in cinema. The model detailed here can also be used for individual or comparative suspense analysis of other literary or cinematic works.

The Art of Pure Cinema

Douglas Keesey, Brian De Palma's Split-Screen: A Life in Film (Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2017), 178. “Body Double: The Set Up—Featurette,” in Body Double (Umbrella Entertainment, 2014), Blu-ray.

The Art of Pure Cinema

In a now-famous interview with François Truffaut in 1962, Alfred Hitchcock described his masterpiece Rear Window (1954) as "the purest expression of a cinematic idea." But what, precisely, did Hitchcock mean by pure cinema? Was pure cinema a function of mise en scène, or composition within the frame? Was it a function of montage, "of pieces of film assembled"? This notion of pure cinema has intrigued and perplexed critics, theorists, and filmmakers alike in the decades following this discussion. And even across his 40-year career, Hitchcock's own ideas about pure cinema remained mired in a lack of detail, clarity, and analytical precision. The Art of Pure Cinema is the first book-length study to examine the historical foundations and stylistic mechanics of pure cinema. Author Bruce Isaacs explores the potential of a philosophical and artistic approach most explicitly demonstrated by Hitchcock in his later films, beginning with Hitchcock's contact with the European avant-garde film movement in the mid-1920s. Tracing the evolution of a philosophy of pure cinema across Hitchcock's most experimental works - Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, Marnie, and Frenzy - Isaacs rereads these works in a new and vital context. In addition to this historical account, the book presents the first examination of pure cinema as an integrated stylistics of mise en scène, montage, and sound design. The films of so-called Hitchcockian imitators like Mario Bava, Dario Argento, and Brian De Palma are also examined in light of a provocative claim: that the art of pure cinema is only fully realized after Hitchcock.

So Deadly So Perverse Giallo Style Films From Around the World Vol 3

Keesey, Douglas, Brian De Palma's Split-Screen: A Life in Film (Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2015), p. 8. 4. Fox, Jordan R., “Riding High on Horror,” Cinefantastique, Volume 10, #1, p. 10.

So Deadly  So Perverse  Giallo Style Films From Around the World  Vol  3

The giallo--a specifically Italian brand of lurid thriller--emerged in the 1960s and became a commercial force to be reckoned with throughout the 1970s. While not all of these films achieved the success and notoriety as the most popular efforts by the likes of Mario Bava, Dario Argento or Lucio Fulci, they nevertheless proved to be immensely popular--with latter-day entries emerging well into the 21st century. They also proved to be influential on films from across the globe; for instance, they helped to set the stage for the slasher movie boom of the late 70s and early 80s, and they would go on to inspire contemporary filmmakers looking to pay homage to their baroque excesses. So Deadly, So Perverse: Volume 3 shines a light on some of these films, some of which are well-known for capturing the off-kilter vibe of these beloved cult classics, and some of which display an influence in more surprising ways. Covering titles produced everywhere from America and Great Britain to Turkey and Japan, this final volume in the So Deadly, So Perverse trilogy offers a final summation of the genre and its lasting cult popularity and appeal. In addition to in-depth coverage of an eclectic range of titles, there are also a number of deliciously sensational and exploitative images, many in full color.The giallo--a specifically Italian brand of lurid thriller--emerged in the 1960s and became a commercial force to be reckoned with throughout the 1970s. While not all of these films achieved the success and notoriety as the most popular efforts by the likes of Mario Bava, Dario Argento or Lucio Fulci, they nevertheless proved to be immensely popular--with latter-day entries emerging well into the 21st century. They also proved to be influential on films from across the globe; for instance, they helped to set the stage for the slasher movie boom of the late 70s and early 80s, and they would go on to inspire contemporary filmmakers looking to pay homage to their baroque excesses. So Deadly, So Perverse: Volume 3 shines a light on some of these films, some of which are well-known for capturing the off-kilter vibe of these beloved cult classics, and some of which display an influence in more surprising ways. Covering titles produced everywhere from America and Great Britain to Turkey and Japan, this final volume in the So Deadly, So Perverse trilogy offers a final summation of the genre and its lasting cult popularity and appeal. In addition to in-depth coverage of an eclectic range of titles, there are also a number of deliciously sensational and exploitative images, many in full color.

The Virtual Window

212 In addition to the two multiple - screen exhibits at the Czech pavilion , an interactive narrative film ... As I've already discussed , Brian De Palma's Sisters ( 1973 ) used the two - way split - screen technique to show both shot ...

The Virtual Window

From the Renaissance idea of the painting as an open window to the nested windows and multiple images on today's cinema, television, and computer screens: a cultural history of the metaphoric, literal, and virtual window. As we spend more and more of our time staring at the screens of movies, televisions, computers, and handheld devices—"windows" full of moving images, texts, and icons—how the world is framed has become as important as what is in the frame. In The Virtual Window, Anne Friedberg examines the window as metaphor, as architectural component, and as an opening to the dematerialized reality we see on the screen. In De pictura (1435), Leon Battista Alberti famously instructed painters to consider the frame of the painting as an open window. Taking Alberti's metaphor as her starting point, Friedberg tracks shifts in the perspectival paradigm as she gives us histories of the architectural window, developments in glass and transparency, and the emerging apparatuses of photography, cinema, television, and digital imaging. Single-point perspective—Alberti's metaphorical window—has long been challenged by modern painting, modern architecture, and moving-image technologies. And yet, notes Friedberg, for most of the twentieth century the dominant form of the moving image was a single image in a single frame. The fractured modernism exemplified by cubist painting, for example, remained largely confined to experimental, avant-garde work. On the computer screen, however, where multiple 'windows' coexist and overlap, perspective may have met its end. In this wide-ranging book, Friedberg considers such topics as the framed view of the camera obscura, Le Corbusier's mandates for the architectural window, Eisenstein's opinions on the shape of the movie screen, and the multiple images and nested windows commonly displayed on screens today. The Virtual Window proposes a new logic of visuality, framed and virtual: an architecture not only of space but of time.

Letters from Hollywood

... had used them; and simultaneously with the Harpur experiment, Brian De Palma was using them in Sisters (1972). Earlier he had used the split-screen technique in Dionysus in '69 (1970). With the exception of De Palma's split screens, ...

Letters from Hollywood

Engaging essays on a wide spectrum of Hollywood directors and the films they created. Journalist and filmmaker Bill Krohn has been the Los Angeles correspondent for the French magazine Cahiers du cinéma for over forty years. Letters from Hollywood brings together thirty-four of his essays, many of them appearing in English for the first time. Focusing most pieces on a particular director and film, Krohn uses his inside knowledge of the studio system to illuminate an art that is also a multibillion-dollar business. He connects currents in French film criticism and theory with an unfolding account of American cinema past and present, offering penetrating insights into directors and their work. Beginning with Allan Dwan, who learned how to make movies before Hollywood was born by watching D. W. Griffith, Krohn presents a panorama that encompasses Alfred Hitchcock and Woody Allen, Stanley Kubrick and Sergio Leone, Star Wars and I Love Lucy. He covers everything from gangsters to gremlins, from blockbusters to no-budget cult films like Moon Over Harlem and Plan 9 from Outer Space, in a style that is accessible to anyone who loves movies, or has a passion for writing about them. Bill Krohn is the Los Angeles correspondent for Cahiers du cinéma. He is the author of Hitchcock at Work, Stanley Kubrick, and Alfred Hitchcock.

Literary Twinship from Shakespeare to the Age of Cloning

Sisters (1973), the first of Brian De Palma's many Hitchcock pastiches, uses split-screen technique during a lengthy suspense sequence to illustrate the film's schizophrenic themes. Two strands thus play out in direct juxtaposition: on ...

Literary Twinship from Shakespeare to the Age of Cloning

Unlike previous efforts that have only addressed literary twinship as a footnote to the doppelganger motif, this book makes a case for the complexity of literary twinship across the literary spectrum. It shows how twins have been instrumental to the formation of comedies of mistaken identity, the detective genre, and dystopian science fiction. The individual chapters trace the development of the category of twinship over time, demonstrating how the twin was repeatedly (re-)invented as a cultural and pathological type when other discursive fields constituted themselves, and how its literary treatment served as the battleground for ideological disputes: by setting the stage for debates regarding kinship and reproduction, or by partaking in discussions of criminality, eugenic greatness, and ‘monstrous births’. The book addresses nearly 100 primary texts, including works of Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Aldous Huxley, Christopher Priest, William Shakespeare, and Zadie Smith.

Cinema in the Digital Age

The self-conscious split screens of Brian De Palma are everywhere today. Coming to mainstream fruition in the late 1960s in such lms as The Thomas Crown Affair and The Boston Strangler, the split screen suggested dissolution – as ...

Cinema in the Digital Age

Does the digital era spell the death of cinema as we know it? Or is it merely heralding its rebirth? Are we witnessing the emergence of something entirely new? Cinema in the Digital Age examines the fate of cinema in this new era, paying special attention to the technologies that are reshaping film and their cultural impact. Examining Festen (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Timecode (2000), Russian Ark (2002), The Ring (2002), among others, this volume explores how these films are haunted by their analogue past and suggests that their signature element are their deliberate imperfections, whether those take the form of blurry or pixilated images, shakey camera work, or other elements reminding viewers of the human hand guiding the camera. Weaving together a rich variety of sources, Cinema in the Digital Age provides a deeply humanistic look at the meaning of cinematic images in the era of digital perfection.

Household Horror

One among many changes made in adapting Stephen King's novel for the screen, the choice of pale satin over thick crushed red ... 16 Brian De Palma's love of split-focus diopters allows for unsettling visual reinforcement of the sewing ...

Household Horror

A scholar examines 14 everyday objects featured in horror films and how they manifest their power and speak to society’s fears. Take a tour of the house where a microwave killed a gremlin, a typewriter made Jack a dull boy, a sewing machine fashioned Carrie’s prom dress, and houseplants might kill you while you sleep. In Household Horror, Marc Olivier highlights the wonder, fear, and terrifying dimension of objects in horror cinema. Inspired by object-oriented ontology and the nonhuman turn in philosophy, Olivier places objects in film on par with humans, arguing, for example, that a sleeper sofa is as much the star of Sisters as Margot Kidder, that The Exorcist is about a possessed bed, and that Rosemary’s Baby is a conflict between herbal shakes and prenatal vitamins. Household Horror reinvigorates horror film criticism by investigating the unfathomable being of objects as seemingly benign as remotes, radiators, refrigerators, and dining tables. Olivier questions what Hitchcock’s Psycho tells us about shower curtains. What can we learn from Freddie Krueger’s greatest accomplice, the mattress? Room by room, Olivier considers the dark side of fourteen household objects to demonstrate how the objects in these films manifest their own power and connect with specific cultural fears and concerns. “Provides a lively and highly original contribution to horror studies. As a work on cinema, it introduces the reader to films that may be less well-known to casual fans and scholars; more conspicuously, it returns to horror staples, gleefully reanimating works that one might otherwise assume had been critically “done to death” (Psycho, The Exorcist, The Shining).” —Allan Cameron, University of Auckland

The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia

90 n DE PALMA, BRiAN More personally satisfying, perhaps, was his career in aviation; a gunner in the Royal Flying Corps during World ... experimenting with different film stocks, or using splitscreen effects to project multiple images.

The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia

Several decades after his last motion picture was produced, Alfred Hitchcock is still regarded by critics and fans alike as one of the masters of cinema. From silents of the 1920s to his final feature in 1976, the director’s many films continue to entertain audiences and inspire filmmakers. In The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia, film critic Stephen Whitty provides a detailed overview of the director's work. This reference volume features in-depth critical entries on each of his major films as well as biographical essays on his most frequent collaborators and discussions of significant themes in his work. For this book, Whitty draws on primary-source materials such as interviews he conducted with associates of the director—including screenwriter Jay Presson Allen (Marnie), actresses Eva Marie Saint (North by Northwest) and Kim Novak (Vertigo), actor Farley Granger (Strangers on a Train), actor and producer Norman Lloyd (Saboteur), and Hitchcock’s daughter Patricia (Stage Fright; Psycho)—among others. Encompassing the entire range of the director’s career—from early influences and silent films to his decade-long television show and cameos in nearly every feature—this is a comprehensive overview of cinema’s ultimate showman. A detailed and lively look at the master of suspense, The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia will be of interest to professors, students, and the many fans of the director’s work.

Imagine Math 3

Brian de Palma is one of directors who use regularly split screen. In Blow out, the scene showing Jack understanding what happened is split. One shot shows Jack listening to the sound of an accident and the other shot shows the accident ...

Imagine Math 3

Imagine mathematics, imagine with the help of mathematics, imagine new worlds, new geometries, new forms. This volume in the series “Imagine Math” casts light on what is new and interesting in the relationships between mathematics, imagination and culture. The book opens by examining the connections between modern and contemporary art and mathematics, including Linda D. Henderson’s contribution. Several further papers are devoted to mathematical models and their influence on modern and contemporary art, including the work of Henry Moore and Hiroshi Sugimoto. Among the many other interesting contributions are an homage to Benoît Mandelbrot with reference to the exhibition held in New York in 2013 and the thoughts of Jean-Pierre Bourguignon on the art and math exhibition at the Fondation Cartier in Paris. An interesting part is dedicated to the connections between math, computer science and theatre with the papers by C. Bardainne and A. Mondot. The topics are treated in a way that is rigorous but captivating, detailed but very evocative. This is an all-embracing look at the world of mathematics and culture.

Danny Boyle Lust for Life

Both Boyle's film and Arnell's video for Robbie Williams use a split-screen effect of a particular kind. Rather than the typical use of split screen in film narrative, which in Brian De Palma's Snake Eyes (1998) or Richard Fleischer's ...

Danny Boyle   Lust for Life

Danny Boyle is one of contemporary filmmaking’s most exciting talents. Since the early 1990s he has steadily created a body of work that crosses genres and defies easy categorisation, from black humour (Shallow Grave), gritty realism (Trainspotting), screwball comedy (A Life Less Ordinary), cult adaptations (The Beach), and horror (28 Days Later), to science fiction (Sunshine), children’s drama (Millions), love stories (Slumdog Millionaire) and tales of personal redemption (127 Hours). Unlike many of his peers, Boyle seems most comfortable when working with modest budgets, relying on acting ability rather than special effects, and surrounding himself with a trusted team of writers, cinematographers and production designers. His restless energy, vitality and drive find their expression in the celebratory tone of his films – their lust for life. In this book, Mark Browning provides a rigorous but highly accessible analysis of Boyle’s work, discussing the processes by which he absorbs generic and literary influences, the way he gains powerful performances both from inexperienced casts and A-list stars, his portrayal of regional identity, his use of moral dilemmas as a narrative trigger, and the religious undercurrents that permeate his films.

Interviews

Brian De Palma Laurence F. Knapp ... The finished film was conceived and completed entirely in split - screen , one side showing the play , the other the audience ... DE PALMA : I was very strongly affected by the play when I saw it .

Interviews

Presents nineteen interviews with the American film director of such movies as "Carrie," "Scarface," and "Mission: Impossible."

Closely Watched Films

Earlier in Napoleon, during a snowball fight, the screen is split into twelve segments. More recently, directors who experiment with splitscreen effects in parts of their films include Brian De Palma in Dressed to Kill (1980), ...

Closely Watched Films

"Through detailed examinations of passages from classic films, Marilyn Fabe supplies the analytic tools and background in film history and theory to enable us to see more in every film we watch"--Page [4] of cover.

Nicolas Cage

Snake Eyes (film) Snake Eyes Snake Eyes film poster Directed by Brian De Palma Screenplay by David Koepp Story by Brian De ... film directed by Brian De Palma, one featuring his trademark use of long tracking shots and split screens.

Nicolas Cage


The Essay Film

... De Landa's The Itch Scratch Itch Cycle (1976) and Ken Jacobs' The Doctor's Dream (1978)) as well as in 'postmodern' narrative cinema abounding in playful self-consciousness and ocular mischief (e.g. Brian De Palma's split-screen ...

The Essay Film

With its increasing presence in a continuously evolving media environment, the essay film as a visual form raises new questions about the construction of the subject, its relationship to the world, and the aesthetic possibilities of cinema. In this volume, authors specializing in various national cinemas (Cuban, French, German, Israeli, Italian, Lebanese, Polish, Russian, American) and critical approaches (historical, aesthetic, postcolonial, feminist, philosophical) explore the essay film and its consequences for the theory of cinema while building on and challenging existing theories. Taking as a guiding principle the essay form's dialogic, fluid nature, the volume examines the potential of the essayistic to question, investigate, and reflect on all forms of cinema—fiction film, popular cinema, and documentary, video installation, and digital essay. A wide range of filmmakers are covered, from Dziga Vertov (Man with a Movie Camera, 1928), Chris Marker (Description of a Struggle, 1960), Nicolás Guillén Landrián (Coffea Arábiga, 1968), Pier Paolo Pasolini (Notes for an African Oresteia, 1969), Chantal Akerman (News from Home, 1976) and Jean-Luc Godard (Notre musique, 2004) to Nanni Moretti (Palombella Rossa, 1989), Mohammed Soueid (Civil War, 2002), Claire Denis (L'Intrus, 2004) and Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life, 2011), among others. The volume argues that the essayistic in film—as process, as experience, as experiment—opens the road to key issues faced by the individual in relation to the collective, but can also lead to its own subversion, as a form of dialectical thought that gravitates towards crisis.

Mental Illness in Popular Culture

Douglas Keesey, Brian De Palma's Split-Screen: A Life in Film (Jackson: University of Mississippi), 156–65. 4. Vincent LoBrutto, By Design: Interviews with Film Production Designers (Westport, CT: Praeger), 188. 5. Gene D. Phillips ...

Mental Illness in Popular Culture

"Being crazy" is generally a negative characterization today, yet many celebrated artists, leaders, and successful individuals have achieved greatness despite suffering from mental illness. This book explores the many different representations of mental illness that exist—and sometimes persist—in both traditional and new media across eras. • Showcases a wide variety of media representations of mental illness and enables readers choose which views they accept • Documents how the work of "classic" authors who wrote about or experienced mental illness—such as Poe or Lovecraft—remain relevant today • Spotlights examples of how popular culture such as comedies mirror changing attitudes toward mental illness and are helping pave the path to greater acceptance