Bringing Back the Beaver

"--Booklist Bringing Back the Beaver is farmer-turned-ecologist Derek Gow's inspirational and often riotously funny firsthand account of how the movement to rewild the British landscape with beavers has become the single most dramatic and ...

Bringing Back the Beaver

"Derek Gow might be the most colorful character in all of Beaverdom"--Ben Goldfarb, author of Eager "A treasure"--Booklist Bringing Back the Beaver is farmer-turned-ecologist Derek Gow's inspirational and often riotously funny firsthand account of how the movement to rewild the British landscape with beavers has become the single most dramatic and subversive nature conservation act of the modern era. Since the early 1990s - in the face of outright opposition from government, landowning elites and even some conservation professionals - Gow has imported, quarantined and assisted the reestablishment of beavers in waterways across England and Scotland. In addition to detailing the ups and downs of rewilding beavers, Bringing Back the Beaver makes a passionate case as to why the return of one of nature's great problem solvers will be critical as part of a sustainable fix for flooding and future drought, whilst ensuring the creation of essential lifescapes that enable the broadest possible spectrum of Britain's wildlife to thrive.

Bringing Back the Beaver

Derek Gow is a man after my own heart, with no interest in diplomacy, but with single-minded determination and a clear vision: to bring beavers back, and to bring nature back, to Britain.' —DAVE GOULSON, author of A Sting in the Tale ...

Bringing Back the Beaver

A bold new voice in nature writing, from the front lines of Britain's rewilding movement Bringing Back the Beaver is farmer-turned-ecologist Derek Gow’s inspirational and often riotously funny firsthand account of how the movement to rewild the British landscape with beavers has become the single most dramatic and subversive nature conservation act of the modern era. Since the early 1990s – in the face of outright opposition from government, landowning elites and even some conservation professionals – Gow has imported, quarantined and assisted the reestablishment of beavers in waterways across England and Scotland. In addition to detailing the ups and downs of rewilding beavers, Bringing Back the Beaver makes a passionate case as to why the return of one of nature’s great problem solvers will be critical as part of a sustainable fix for flooding and future drought, whilst ensuring the creation of essential lifescapes that enable the broadest possible spectrum of Britain’s wildlife to thrive.

Bringing Back the Wolves

Return. of. the. Beaver. A tail slaps the water as a warning that danger lurks nearby — a wolf, a bear, a coyote, an eagle or a hawk. The beavers have come back. Beavers, the largest rodents in North America, are loggers.

Bringing Back the Wolves

An unintended experiment teaches real-life lessons about life’s intricate interconnections. In the 1800s, the American government decided to eliminate threats to livestock near Yellowstone National Park. By 1926, there were no gray wolves left in the park. This set off a cascade of devastating changes to virtually every part of the park’s ecosystem, and the once-thriving landscape was soon in distress. Then, in an effort to reverse course, gray wolves were reintroduced in 1995. In time, animal populations start to stabilize, waterways are restored and, miraculously, health returns to the park. This remarkable story of transformation is sure to captivate, and to inspire respect for nature’s surprisingly complex balancing act.

Wildlife Review

We've got to think beyond the law , for no game regulation makes you draw a deadcertain bead , or leave the best squirrel factories in the woods . " MAMMALS -- BEAVER Oryx 1 ( 5 ) : 244-245 . Anonymous , BRINGING BACK THE BEAVER TO ...

Wildlife Review


Wilding

Bringing. back. the. Beaver. Coghlan, Andy. Should the UK bring back beavers to help manage floods?' New Scientist (13 November 2015) Collen, P, and Gibson, R. “The general ecology of beavers as related to their influence on stream ...

Wilding

An inspiring story about what happens when 3,500 acres of land, farmed for centuries, is left to return to the wild, and about the wilder, richer future a natural landscape can bring. For years Charlie Burrell and his wife, Isabella Tree, farmed Knepp Castle Estate and struggled to turn a profit. By 2000, with the farm facing bankruptcy, they decided to try something radical. They would restore Knepp’s 3,500 acres to the wild. Using herds of free-roaming animals to mimic the actions of the megafauna of the past, they hoped to bring nature back to their depleted land. But what would the neighbors say, in the manicured countryside of modern England where a blade of grass out of place is considered an affront? In the face of considerable opposition the couple persisted with their experiment and soon witnessed an extraordinary change. New life flooded into Knepp, now a breeding hotspot for rare and threatened species like turtle doves, peregrine falcons, and purple emperor butterflies. The fabled English nightingale sings again. At a time of looming environmental disaster, Wilding is an inspiring story of a farm, a couple, and a community transformed. Isabella Tree’s wonderful book brings together science, natural history, a fair bit of drama, and—ultimately—hope.

Urban Geology

5.1.5.3 “Hello Beaver” (Bringing Back the Beaver to the Headwaters of the River Birs) The third example illustrates a project that was initiated in the late nineties by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to bring the beaver back to ...

Urban Geology

Urban subsurface resources and particularly urban groundwater are vulnerable to environmental impacts, and their rational management is of major importance. In this book a multidisciplinary team of specialists and scientists presents innovative process-oriented approaches to the sustainable use of these resources. The included case studies from northwestern Switzerland describe representative environments and are relevant for urban areas in general. They illustrate the protection of groundwater; river restoration; engineering and hydrogeological questions related to urban infrastructure and management concepts; as well as monitoring, modeling and remediation strategies for contaminated sites; problems caused by karst in urban environments; the use of shallow geothermal energy; and natural hazards such as flood events and earthquakes. It is demonstrated that modern quantitative earth sciences can contribute significantly in finding solutions concerning the sustainable use of subsurface resources in urban environments. The book is an invaluable source of information for hydrogeologists, geologists, urban planners, water supply engineers, and environmental agencies.

Wildlife Abstracts

POCKET GOPHERS KANGAROO RATS & POCKET MICE BEAVER BEAVER ... Adams , Arthur K. SOME PHYSICO - CHEMICAL EFFECTS OF BEAVER DAMS UPON MICHIGAN TROUT STREAMS IN THE WATERSMEET AREA . ... BRINGING BACK THE BEAVER TO SASKATCHEWAN .

Wildlife Abstracts


Journal of the Assembly Legislature of the State of California

Bringing back the beaver . Sierra Club Bull . , vol . 27 , no . 4 , p . 116-118 . Historic distribution , transplanting work , habitat requirements , effect of trout , fur value . Twining , Howard 1942b . [ Transplanting beaver in ...

Journal of the Assembly  Legislature of the State of California


Smoke Hole

Derek Gow BRINGING BACK THE BEAVER The Sion of One Manut wild britain ' Woterway BRINGING BACK THE BEAVER The Story of One Man's Quest to Rewild Britain's Waterways DEREK GOW 9781603589963 Hardcover A Small FARM FUTURE LIINTELE NOLL ...

Smoke Hole

"With potent, lyrical language and a profound knowledge of storytelling, Shaw encourages and illuminates the mythic in our own lives. He is a modern-day bard." – Madeline Miller, author of Circe and The Song of Achilles At a time when we are all confronted by not one, but many crossroads in our modern lives—identity, technology, trust, politics, and a global pandemic—celebrated mythologist and wilderness guide Martin Shaw delivers Smoke Hole: three metaphors to help us understand our world, one that is assailed by the seductive promises of social media and shadowed by a health crisis that has brought loneliness and isolation to an all-time high. Smoke Hole is a passionate call to arms and an invitation to use these stories to face the complexities of contemporary life, from fake news, parenthood, climate crises, addictive technology and more. Shaw urges us to reclaim our imagination and untangle ourselves from modern menace, letting these tales be our guide. More Praise: "I can still remember the first time I heard Martin Shaw tell a story. The tale that emerged was like a living thing, bounding around, throwing itself at us there listening. I had never heard anything like it before." – Paul Kingsnorth, Booker shortlisted author of The Wake "Martin Shaw’s work is so very beautiful. A new animal. His love of images is deep and contagious." – Coleman Barks, author of The Essential Rumi "Through feral tales and poetic exegesis, Martin Shaw makes you re-see the world, as a place of adventure, and of initiation, as perfect home, and as perfectly other. What a gift." – David Keenan, author of Xstabeth "Shaw has so much wisdom and knowledge about the old stories, it emanates from his pores." – John Densmore, The Doors

Wild Kingdom

Bringing Back Britain's Wildlife Stephen Moss. European beavers – whose global population fell to just 1,200 individuals at the turn of the twentieth century – have now been successfully reintroduced to more than twenty countries ...

Wild Kingdom

Shortlisted for THE WAINWRIGHT BOOK PRIZE 2017 Can Britain make room for wildlife? Stephen Moss believes it can. The newspaper headlines tell us that Britain’s wildlife is in trouble. It’s not just rare creatures that are vanishing, hares and hedgehogs, skylarks and water voles, even the humble house sparrow, are in freefall. But there is also good news. Otters have returned to the River Tyne; there are now beavers on the River Otter; and peregrines have taken up residence in the heart of London. Stephen Moss travels the length and breadth of the UK, from the remote archipelago of St Kilda to our inner cities, to witness at first-hand how our wild creatures are faring and ask how we can bring back Britain’s wildlife.

The New Ecology

The loss of species that are reliant on riverine habitat, including beavers, notwithstanding, overbrowsing can alter the physical properties of rivers and streams themselves. ... However, bringing back the beaver may not be enough.

The New Ecology

Our species has transitioned from being one among millions on Earth to the species that is single-handedly transforming the entire planet to suit its own needs. In order to meet the daunting challenges of environmental sustainability in this epoch of human domination--known as the Anthropocene--ecologists have begun to think differently about the interdependencies between humans and the natural world. This concise and accessible book provides the best available introduction to what this new ecology is all about--and why it matters more than ever before. Oswald Schmitz describes how the science of ecology is evolving to provide a better understanding of how human agency is shaping the natural world, often in never-before-seen ways. The new ecology emphasizes the importance of conserving species diversity, because it can offer a portfolio of options to keep our ecosystems resilient in the face of environmental change. It envisions humans taking on new roles as thoughtful stewards of the environment to ensure that ecosystems have the enduring capacity to supply the environmental services on which our economic well-being--and our very existence--depend. It offers the ecological know-how to maintain and enhance our planet's environmental performance and ecosystem production for the benefit of current and future generations. Informative and engaging, The New Ecology shows how today's ecology can provide the insights we need to appreciate the crucial role we play in this era of unprecedented global environmental transition. -- Provided by publisher.

What is Farming

Bringing back the beaver is an outstanding achievement in conservation . This fur animal whose extermination was our first big business has been put to work to save us from our own abuse of the land . Beavers can play an important role ...

What is Farming


What is Farming

Bringing back the beaver is an outstanding achievement in conservation . This fur animal whose extermination was our first big business has been put to work to save us from our own abuse of the land . Beavers can play an important role ...

What is Farming


Understanding and Managing Tourism Impacts

... the first country in the UK to bring back this charismatic and useful creature' (BBC News 2007b). Similarly, Iain Valentine, the head of animals, education and conservation at the RZSS, commented, Beaver reintroductions have proved ...

Understanding and Managing Tourism Impacts

As one of the world’s largest industries, tourism carries with it significant social, environmental, economic and political impacts. Although tourism can provide significant economic benefits for some destinations, the image of tourism as a benign and environmentally friendly industry has often been challenged. There is a clear and growing body of evidence that suggests that the effects of tourism development are far more complex than policy-makers usually suggest and that the impacts of tourism occur not just at the destination but at all stages of a tourist’s trip. Furthermore, tourism does not exist in a vacuum. Broader social and environmental changes also shape the form, growth and experience of tourism development. This text provides a clear, accessible and up-to-date synthesis of tourism’s role in our contemporary world, both as an agent of change, and as a response to it. Tourism-related change is approached from a framework that illustrates the changing environments in which they occur, including the spatial scale of such impacts and the effects of these impacts over time. This framework is then applied to the economic, socio-cultural and physical dimensions of tourism. After examining the different forms of tourism-related impacts, the book then discusses the role of planning as part of an integrated approach to the mitigation of undesirable impacts and the maximization of the desirable benefits of tourism development. Case studies and illustrations from a variety of locations from around the world are used throughout the book to exemplify key themes and issues; additionally figures and tables serve to elucidate statistical data. Understanding and Managing Tourism Impacts illustrates that when well managed tourism can make a positive contribution to destinations. The books use of issues of scale, time and form to illustrate the effects of tourism provide an accessible and significant reminder that tourism’s impacts vary over time and space, affects both the visitor and the host community, and can be unpredictable in its consequences. Chapter objectives, recommended readings, and links to web-based material help students, practitioners and researchers to grasp the broader implications of tourism development in today's world. With tourism increasingly being implicated as a factor in climate and environmental change, and with the benefits and costs of tourism as a form of economic development being examined more closely than ever, this book provides a timely contribution to help clarify the potentials and pitfalls of contemporary tourism.

Max Beaverbrook

Beaverbrook wrote to him that it is a personal delight to me that you have received this promotion ... and I send you my warmest congratulations . ... Come what may, the Beaver had to be brought back into the circle. Once brought back ...

Max Beaverbrook

Financial magician, flamboyant politician, minister in both world wars, press baron, serial philanderer, Winston Churchill's boon companion in the dark days of 1940-41 and in his later years, Max Beaverbrook was without a doubt one of the most colourful characters of the first half of the twentieth century. Born and brought up in the Scottish Presbyterian fastness of northeast Canada, he escaped to make his fortune in Canadian financial markets. By 1910, when he migrated to Britain at the age of thirty-one, he was already a multimillionaire. With a seat in the House of Commons and then a peerage, he came to know all the senior figures in both British and Canadian politics. In acquiring the Daily Express, he not only built it into a news empire but used its considerable influence to campaign for his own pet causes. As Charles Williams's sweeping biography shows, Beaverbrook was loved and loathed in equal measure. Nevertheless, Williams brings to life a rounded character, with all its flaws and virtues. Above all, it is a story of eighty years of entrepreneurism, political dogfights, wars, sex and grand living, all set in the rich tapestry of the dramatic years of the twentieth century.

Country Life

MARCH 3 , 2005 BEAVERS , YES ; WOLVES , NO B RINGING back the beaver has a jaunty ring as well as burrowing in ... the 12th Consider all the facts and it is evident that bringing back the century , and possibly even later in Scotland .

Country Life


Merlin s Kin

They were looking for beaver , so he strode right up to a beaver dam and tore it open . His power struck the beaver and they ... Asidenigan made many trips into the wilderness , bringing back beaver and other food with each return .

Merlin s Kin

Collects tales of magicians from cultures across the globe, including Wales, Ghana, Russia, and Native America

Climate Savvy

wetland-dependent species such as amphibians and many birds could take place in a broader context of beaver ... and may thus be an important additional step in bringing back resident beaver populations and the resilience to climate ...

Climate Savvy

Climate change demands a change in how we envision, prioritize, and implement conservation and management of natural resources. Addressing threats posed by climate change cannot be simply an afterthought or an addendum, but must be integrated into the very framework of how we conceive of and conduct conservation and management. In Climate Savvy, climate change experts Lara Hansen and Jennifer Hoffman offer 18 chapters that consider the implications of climate change for key resource management issues of our time—invasive species, corridors and connectivity, ecological restoration, pollution, and many others. How will strategies need to change to facilitate adaptation to a new climate regime? What steps can we take to promote resilience? Based on collaboration with a wide range of scientists, conservation leaders, and practitioners, the authors present general ideas as well as practical steps and strategies that can help cope with this new reality. While climate change poses real threats, it also provides a chance for creative new thinking. Climate Savvy offers a wide-ranging exploration of how scientists, managers, and policymakers can use the challenge of climate change as an opportunity to build a more holistic and effective philosophy that embraces the inherent uncertainty and variability of the natural world to work toward a more robust future.

Renewing the World

While the elder brother was wandering about the island , little beaver and Old Robe jumped on the raft and made their way ... And every spring he returned to the island and the lodge of the Beaver Chief , bringing back each time a new ...

Renewing the World

A valuable resource for anthropologists, ethnohistorians, and western historians who wish to better understand ritual life in the Plains region. ÑWestern Historical Quarterly "Harrod's discussion of kinship and reciprocity in Northwest Plains cosmology contains valuable insight into Native American worldview, and his emphasis on the moral dimension of ritual process is a major addition to the too-often ignored subject of Native American moral life." ÑJournal of Religion "Includes the major works on Blackfoot, Crow, Cheyennes, and Arapaho religion, the works to which anyone who wishes to understand the religious life of these tribes must continue to turn." ÑChoice "Plains people, Harrod suggests, refracted nature and conceived an environmental ethic through a metaphor of kinship. He is particularly skillful in characterizing the ambiguity Plains people expressed at the necessity of killing and eating their animal kin. Renewing the World also contributes to another new and uncultivated science we might call 'ecology of mind'." ÑGreat Plains Quarterly

Recovering Lost Species in the Modern Age

And here a promise means something.57 Bringing back beavers, a “treasure” of the Swedish fauna, was a people's project. The donors came from a wide range of social classes, and so did the men who helped with the practicalities.

Recovering Lost Species in the Modern Age

A groundbreaking study of how emotions motivate attempts to counter species loss. This groundbreaking book brings together environmental history and the history of emotions to examine the motivations behind species conservation actions. In Recovering Lost Species in the Modern Age, Dolly Jørgensen uses the environmental histories of reintroduction, rewilding, and resurrection to view the modern conservation paradigm of the recovery of nature as an emotionally charged practice. Jørgensen argues that the recovery of nature—identifying that something is lost and then going out to find it and bring it back—is a nostalgic practice that looks to a historical past and relies on the concept of belonging to justify future-oriented action. The recovery impulse depends on emotional responses to what is lost, particularly a longing for recovery that manifests itself in such emotions as guilt, hope, fear, and grief. Jørgensen explains why emotional frameworks matter deeply—both for how people understand nature theoretically and how they interact with it physically. The identification of what belongs (the lost nature) and our longing (the emotional attachment to it) in the present will affect how environmental restoration practices are carried out in the future. A sustainable future will depend on questioning how and why belonging and longing factor into the choices we make about what to recover.