Britain s Greatest Aircraft

This book describes the design-history, development and operational careers of twenty-two legendary military and civil aeroplanes. Each one has played a significant part in aviation history.

Britain s Greatest Aircraft

During the last century the British aircraft industry created and produced many outstanding aeroplanes. These aircraft were world leaders in advanced technology, utilizing inventions by British engineers and scientists such as radar, the jet engine, the ejector seat and vertical take-off and landing. This book describes the design-history, development and operational careers of twenty-two legendary military and civil aeroplanes. Each one has played a significant part in aviation history. Sopwith Camel, SE.5, Bristol F2B Fighter and the Airco DH4 were all great successes in the relatively early days of flight. In the thirties the Bristol Bulldog fighter was an outstanding export success and the Short 'C' Class flying boat, later to become the Sunderland of World War II fame, pioneered the long-distance routes to the Empire. The pugnacious foreign policy of Hitler's Reich rung sudden alarm bells, rapid advances in fighting aircraft for the RAF became a premium objective. The brilliant Geodic construction of the Vickers Wellington bomber helped it survive terrible punishment throughout World War II, both the Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire saved England from invasion and the Bristol Beaufighter, de Havilland Mosquito and Avro Lancaster took the war to enemy soil. The Gloster Meteor became the word's first operational jet fighter and the English Electric Canberra became the RAF's first jet bomber and was manufactured under licence in the USA as the Martin B-57. In post-war years the Vickers Viscount became the world's first turboprop airliner and eventually became Britain's best selling commercial aircraft, whilst the de Havilland Comet became the world's first jet airliner. Despite Britain's recessionary years in the 50s and early 60s, military success came with the beautiful Hawker Hunter, the super-sonic Fairey Delta experimental aircraft that broke the World Air Speed Record and the Vickers Valiant that pioneered the operational techniques to deliver Britain's nuclear deterrent. Later, there followed the Mach 2 English Electric Lightning and the ill-fated TSR-2, the cancellation of which is still regarded as one of the greatest mistakes ever made in British aviation history. Finally, the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter that is still in service and now only being built in the USA. Finally the Harrier, the world's first vertical take-off and landing jet fighter, still in service and now being further developed in the USA.

Britain s Greatest Defeat

of Wales's anti - aircraft armament comprised sixteen 5.25 inch guns which could be used against either surface or high - level targets . Against low - flying aircraft there were several eight - barrelled two - pounder pom - poms ...

Britain s Greatest Defeat

New in paperback, The pre-eminent history of a military disaster. A masterful analysis of events.

Britain s Greatest Generation

In association with the flagship BBC2 series. This is the story of the men and women of a truly remarkable generation.

Britain s Greatest Generation

In association with the flagship BBC2 series. This is the story of the men and women of a truly remarkable generation. Born into a world still reeling from the earth-shattering events of the Great War, they grew up during the appalling economic depression of the 1930s, witnessed the globe tear itself apart again during the Second World War, and emerged from post-war austerity determined to create a new society for their children. It is the story of people who raised their families during the immense social upheaval of the Fifties and Sixties, as the world in which they had grown up changed inexorably. It is the story of the people who shaped the way we live now. Britain's Greatest Generation tells this multi-faceted story through the eye-witness accounts of those who were there, from Japanese prisoner of war Fergus Anckorn to Dame Vera Lynn, from Bletchley Park veteran Jean Valentine to Dad's Army creator Jimmy Perry, and from fighter pilot Tom Neil to the Queen's cousin Margaret Rhodes. Together their testimony creates a vivid, often deeply moving picture of an extraordinary epoch – and the extraordinary people who lived through it.

Spitfire

THE SUNDAY TIMES NON FICTION BESTSELLER WHSmith NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 'The best book you will ever read about Britain's greatest warplane' Patrick Bishop, bestselling author of Fighter Boys ‘A rich and heartfelt tribute to ...

Spitfire

THE SUNDAY TIMES NON FICTION BESTSELLER WHSmith NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018 'The best book you will ever read about Britain's greatest warplane' Patrick Bishop, bestselling author of Fighter Boys ‘A rich and heartfelt tribute to this most iconic British machine’ Rowland White, bestselling author of Vulcan 607 'As the RAF marks its centenary, Nichol has created a thrilling and often moving tribute to some of its greatest heroes' Mail on Sunday magazine The iconic Spitfire found fame during the darkest early days of World War II. But what happened to the redoubtable fighter and its crews beyond the Battle of Britain, and why is it still so loved today? In late spring 1940, Nazi Germany’s domination of Europe had looked unstoppable. With the British Isles in easy reach since the fall of France, Adolf Hitler was convinced that Great Britain would be defeated in the skies over her southern coast, confident his Messerschmitts and Heinkels would outclass anything the Royal Air Force threw at them. What Hitler hadn’t planned for was the agility and resilience of a marvel of British engineering that would quickly pass into legend – the Spitfire. Bestselling author John Nichol’s passionate portrait of this magnificent fighter aircraft, its many innovations and updates, and the people who flew and loved them, carries the reader beyond the dogfights over Kent and Sussex. Spanning the full global reach of the Spitfire’s deployment during WWII, from Malta to North Africa and the Far East, then over the D-Day beaches, it is always accessible, effortlessly entertaining and full of extraordinary spirit. Here are edge-of-the-seat stories and heart-stopping first-hand accounts of battling pilots forced to bail out over occupied territory; of sacrifice and wartime love; of aristocratic female flyers, and of the mechanics who braved the Nazi onslaught to keep the aircraft in battle-ready condition. Nichol takes the reader on a hair-raising, nail-biting and moving wartime history of the iconic Spitfire populated by a cast of redoubtable, heroic characters that make you want to stand up and cheer.

From the Wright Brothers to Top Gun

This book examines the ways in which aeroplanes and flying have been portrayed in the many different genres within popular cinema, from Hollywood epics to comedy spoofs to modern tragedies.

From the Wright Brothers to Top Gun

The cinema and aviation developed alongside each other, and were both products of the technology and imagination of the early 20th century. This book examines the ways in which aeroplanes and flying have been portrayed in the many different genres within popular cinema, from Hollywood epics to comedy spoofs to modern tragedies. It covers over 500 American and British films, including, The Dambusters, The High and the Mighty, Airplane, Top Gun and The Shadowmakers.

10 Greatest British Military Aircraft

This book tells the story of UK military aviation from the early bi-plane era to the modern day through ten of Britain's best war planes.

10 Greatest British Military Aircraft

This book tells the story of UK military aviation from the early bi-plane era to the modern day through ten of Britain's best war planes. It charts an aerial course though two world wars into the Cold War jet-age and onto the smart-bomb, laser-guided conflicts of the twenty-first century. It's a tale of dog-fights, air-strikes and the men and machines that gave Britain mastery of the skies. The book features pen-portraits of ten of the most notable aeroplanes to serve in Britain's armed forces from the bi-plane era to the modern day. It takes the reader through the aviation ages, charting the early years of flight in the First World War, through to the Second World War and then the golden age of British jet aircraft in the 1950s and 60s before finishing in the modern day. The aircraft include the Sopwith Camel, the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire (arguably most important double-act in British military history), the Avro Lancaster, the de Havilland Mosquito,the Hawker Hunter, the English Electric Lightning, the Avro Vulcan, the Hawker Harrier and the BAE Hawk.

The Spitfire Kids

Spitfire Kids is based on the hit BBC Worldwide podcast Spitfire: The People's Story, and uses contemporary diaries and memoirs, many of them previously unpublished, to tell the story of Britain's most iconic fighter aircraft through the ...

The Spitfire Kids

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER 'An inspirational read celebrating the incredible young people who gave so much for this iconic British aircraft'. John Nichol, bestselling author of Spitfire: A Very British Love Story Despite the many films and television programmes over the decades since the end of the Second World War that portrays our allied heroes as grown-up men and women, the Battle of Britain was in the main actually fought and won by teenagers. The average age of an RAF fighter pilot was just twenty years old. Many of the men and women who designed and built their planes were even younger. Based on the hit BBC World Service podcast Spitfire: The People's Story, we use contemporary diaries and memoirs, many of them previously unpublished, to tell the story of the Spitfire through the voices of the teenagers who risked everything to design, build and fly her. This isn't a story of stiff-upper lips, stoical moustaches and aerial heroics; it's a story of love and loss, a story of young people tested to the very limits of their endurance. Young people who won a battle that turned a war.

The World s Greatest Aircraft

Drawings, photographs, and text describe a variety of fighter planes, both U.S. and foreign, in use in World Wars I and II, including Britain's Sopwith Camel, the German Fokker and Messerschmitts, the American Curtiss series and the ...

The World s Greatest Aircraft

Drawings, photographs, and text describe a variety of fighter planes, both U.S. and foreign, in use in World Wars I and II, including Britain's Sopwith Camel, the German Fokker and Messerschmitts, the American Curtiss series and the Lockheed Lightning.

The World s Greatest Aircraft

Covers all the famous aircraft from the Red Baron's World War I Fokker triplane to the European Airbus and Tornado projects of the 1980s

The World s Greatest Aircraft

Covers all the famous aircraft from the Red Baron's World War I Fokker triplane to the European Airbus and Tornado projects of the 1980s

British Special Projects

Heading the design office was Avro's Technical Director Roy Chadwick (1893–1947), who created the Avro Lancaster and is now generally regarded as one of Britain's greatest aircraft designers. Initially, Chadwick envisaged a more ...

British Special Projects

• An insight into British ambitious and often unrealistic aspirations to stay at the forefront of advanced technology such as the development of the atomic-powered warplane • The world’s first military flying wing was a British design that saw operational service during the First World War • A manned rocket-ship launched from a converted V-bomber was proposed, capable of reaching the edge of space • Beautifully illustrated with many rare and unpublished photographs • Of interest to aviation and military historians, modellers, gamers and flight simulator enthusiasts Flying wings, deltas and tailless aircraft continue to generate enormous interest within the aviation community and many of the older designs still look surprisingly futuristic. British Special Projects: Flying Wings, Deltas and Tailless Designs examines the lesser-known and frequently secret British projects undertaken for research or military purposes during the last century and also covers those aircraft that were built and in some cases entered service. The first commercially successful British flying wing biplane designed by John Dunne undertook limited military reconnaissance duties during the First World War. Various flying wings followed but the German development of the delta would prove massively influential with post-war British aerodynamicists immediately recognising the potential for a new generation of high-performance designs. Parallel research into advanced flying wings would produce plans for the superb looking Barnes Wallace supersonic swing-wing bomber, although his design was too far ahead of its time to progress any further. There were also dead-end projects for bombers powered by atomic propulsion, vertical take-off concepts and over-ambitious ideas for British spacecraft that utilised delta- and blended-wing bodies, but were too technically challenging and costly to develop further. Nevertheless, many of these designs that stemmed from the simple flying wing remain influential today.

A History of Modern Britain

The British kept building (Figure 9.1). In terms of overall tonnage of warships launched between 1928 and 1941, the Royal Navy achieved one million tons, the USA 700,000, and Japan 600,000. In 1940 Britain had the greatest aircraft ...

A History of Modern Britain

A History of Modern Britain: 1714 to the Present presents a lively introduction to the history of the modern British Isles from the Hanoverian succession to the present day. Develops themes of tradition and change, the role of the four nations of the British Isles, and Britain in a world context Complements the narrative with descriptions of fascinating personalities from Britain's past, from the arsonist James Aitken and the female adventurer Jane Digby, to the celebrity footballer George Best Includes features to help orientate the reader: illustrations, maps, royal family genealogies, chronology, and glossary; online supplements include preliminary chapter from 1688 An accompanying website containing additional support and materials for lecturers and students is available at www.wiley.com/go/wasson

British Built Aircraft

From the base of its First World War production , the Vickers Company established itself as one of Britain's greatest aircraft manufacturers . One of Vickers ' most impressive achievements was its ability to create successful designs in ...

British Built Aircraft

A history of British built aircraft

Britain s War Machine

On leaving office in May 1940 Chamberlain left Britain with the world's largest navy, the greatest aircraft production of any country, and a small but uniquely mechanized army. Britain planned to fight, and largely did fight, ...

Britain s War Machine

The familiar image of the British in the Second World War is that of the plucky underdog taking on German might. David Edgerton's bold, compelling new history shows the conflict in a new light, with Britain as a very wealthy country, formidable in arms, ruthless in pursuit of its interests, and in command of a global production system. Rather than belittled by a Nazi behemoth, Britain arguably had the world's most advanced mechanized forces. It had not only a great empire, but allies large and small. Edgerton shows that Britain fought on many fronts and its many home fronts kept it exceptionally well supplied with weapons, food and oil, allowing it to mobilize to an extraordinary extent. It created and deployed a vast empire of machines, from the humble tramp steamer to the battleship, from the rifle to the tank, made in colossal factories the world over. Scientists and engineers invented new weapons, encouraged by a government and prime minister enthusiastic about the latest technologies. The British, indeed Churchillian, vision of war and modernity was challenged by repeated defeat at the hands of less well-equipped enemies. Yet the end result was a vindication of this vision. Like the United States, a powerful Britain won a cheap victory, while others paid a great price. Putting resources, machines and experts at the heart of a global rather than merely imperial story, Britain's War Machine demolishes timeworn myths about wartime Britain and gives us a groundbreaking and often unsettling picture of a great power in action.

Britain s Greatest Warship

This work recounts the story of the Ark Royal from the laying down of her keel in 1943 through her decommissioning in 1979 and her scrapping in 1980.

Britain s Greatest Warship

HMS Ark Royal IV launched in 1950 was the most famous Royal Navy warship of the postwar era. The author tells her story from the laying down of her keel in 1943 through to her scrapping in 1980 using interviews and first-hand accounts from former officers and crew.

Winkle

Pre-order the daring life story and astonishing adventures of Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown - Britain's greatest-ever pilot.

Winkle

Pre-order the daring life story and astonishing adventures of Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown - Britain's greatest-ever pilot. Brown's extraordinary flying career saw him fight in the Battle of Britain, narrowly escape death on a torpedoed aircraft carrier, achieve a litany of new records and firsts as a test pilot, and fly more kinds of aircraft than any other pilot in history. With a life as remarkable as his flying, Brown faced imprisonment in Germany at the outbreak of WWII, and after the Allied victory his fluent German saw him interviewing senior Nazi officials and participating in the liberation of Belsen - an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life. A rival to Chuck Yeager and hero to astronaut Neil Armstrong, by the time of his death in 2016 Winkle Brown had become a legend in his own lifetime and a national treasure. Drawing on Brown's own papers and fascinating new research, Paul Beaver uncovers surprising new truths and incredible achievements in the definitive account of a pilot and man who was revered around the world.

Pioneering Places of British Aviation

This led to the development of the twin-engine Type O which was the largest aircraft yet built in the UK. The O/100 first flew late in 1915 and led to the O/400 of which about 400 were built before the end of the war.

Pioneering Places of British Aviation

From as early as the beginning of the nineteenth century, Britain was at the forefront of powered flight. Across the country many places became centres of innovation and experimentation, as increasing numbers of daring men took to the skies. It was in 1799, at Brompton Hall, that Sir George Cayley Bart put forward ideas which formed the basis of powered flight. Cayley is widely regarded as the father of aviation and his ancestral home the ‘cradle’ of British aviation. There were balloon flights at Hendon from 1862, although attempts at powered flights from the area later used as the famous airfield, do not seem to have been particularly successful. Despite this, Louis Bleriot established a flying school there in 1910. It was gliders that Percy Pilcher flew from the grounds of Stamford Hall, Leicestershire during the 1890s. He was killed in a crash there in 1899, but Pilcher had plans for a powered aircraft which experts believe may well have enabled him to beat the Wright Brothers in becoming the first to make a fixed-wing powered flight. At Brooklands attempts were made to build and fly a powered aircraft in 1906 even before the banked racetrack was completed but these were unsuccessful. But on 8 June 1908, A.V. Roe made what is considered to be the first powered flight in Britain from there – in reality a short hop – in a machine of his own design and construction, enabling Brooklands to claim to be the birthplace of British aviation. These are just a few of the many places investigated by Bruce Hales-Dutton in this intriguing look at the early days of British aviation, which includes the first ever aircraft factory in Britain in the railway arches at Battersea; Larkhill on Salisbury Plain which became the British Army’s first airfield, and Barking Creek where Frederick Handley Page established his first factory.

The Battle of Britain The Greatest Air Battle of World War II

With a finely-struck balance of historical background and dramatic renderings of RAF and Luftwaffe engagements over the English countryside, Hough and Richards offer a history that is at once deep and wide-ranging.

The Battle of Britain  The Greatest Air Battle of World War II

A definitive account of the three-month air battle in 1940 between the Royal Air Force and the Luftwaffe. The victory of the Battle of Britain ranks with Marathon and the Marne as a decisive point in history. At the end of June 1940, having overrun much of Western Europe, the Nazi war leaders knew that they had to defeat the Royal Air Force Fighter Command before they could invade the British mainland. With a finely-struck balance of historical background and dramatic renderings of RAF and Luftwaffe engagements over the English countryside, Hough and Richards offer a history that is at once deep and wide-ranging. They offer insight into how the British laid the groundwork for victory through aircraft research and production, the development and implementation of command and control structures, and research into new technologies, the most important of which was radar. Hough and Richards also utilize first-person accounts of the battle whenever possible, rendering the battle scenes with cinematic intensity. A compelling introduction to one of the most important battles of World War II, The Battle of Britain pays tribute to the men about whom Winston Churchill would remark, "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

The British Carrier Strike Fleet after 1945

______, The World Guide to Combat Planes, Volumes 1 and 2 (London: Macdonald, 1966). ______, and Punnett, Dennis, Macdonald World Air Power Guide (London: Macdonald, 1963). Grey, Jeffrey, Up Top – The Royal Australian Navy and Southeast ...

The British Carrier Strike Fleet after 1945

“A comprehensive study of the bittersweet post WWII history of British naval aviation . . . will become a standard reference for its subject.”—Firetrench In 1945 the most powerful fleet in the Royal Navy’s history was centered on nine aircraft carriers. This book charts the post-war fortunes of this potent strike force; its decline in the face of diminishing resources, its final fall at the hands of uncomprehending politicians, and its recent resurrection in the form of the Queen Elizabeth class carriers, the largest ships ever built for the Royal Navy. After 1945 “experts” prophesied that nuclear weapons would make conventional forces obsolete, but British carrier-borne aircraft were almost continuously employed in numerous conflicts as far apart as Korea, Egypt, the Persian Gulf, the South Atlantic, East Africa and the Far East, often giving successive British Governments options when no others were available. In the process the Royal Navy invented many of the techniques and devices crucial to modern carrier operations angled decks, steam catapults and deck-landing aids while also pioneering novel forms of warfare like helicopter-borne assault, and tactics for countering such modern plagues as insurgency and terrorism. This book combines narratives of these poorly understood operations with a clear analysis of the strategic and political background, benefiting from the author's personal experience of both carrier flying and the workings of Whitehall. It is an important but largely untold story, of renewed significance as Britain once again embraces carrier aviation. “Makes a timely and welcome appearance . . . will make compelling reading for those with serious concern for our naval affairs.”—St. Andrews in Focus

Spreading My Wings

In 1962 she was awarded the Jean Lennox Bird Trophy for notable achievement in aviation, but her greatest moment was yet to come, when in 1963 she flew a Lightning through the sound barrier, becoming “the fastest woman in the world.” ...

Spreading My Wings

The remarkable autobiography of a pioneering female aviator who left a privileged life to serve in World War II. Her father was a millionaire race-car driver who became chairman of Bentley Motors, and her grandfather cofounded the De Beers mining company. But by the late 1930s, debutante Diana Barnato had enough of her affluent, chaperoned existence and sought excitement in flying—soloing at Brooklands after only six hours’ training. Joining the Air Transport Auxiliary in 1941 to help ferry aircraft to squadrons and bases throughout the country, she flew scores of different aircraft—fighters, bombers, and trainers—in all kinds of conditions, and without a radio. By 1945, Barnato had lost many friends, a fiancé, and a husband—but she continued to fly. In 1962 she was awarded the Jean Lennox Bird Trophy for notable achievement in aviation, but her greatest moment was yet to come, when in 1963 she flew a Lightning through the sound barrier, becoming “the fastest woman in the world.” Spreading My Wings is her remarkable memoir, brimming with history and adventure.

Britain s Glorious Aircraft Industry

caused HMS Furious to be modified into a complete “flat topaircraft carrier (recommissioned in 1925). An incomplete ocean liner in build in a Scottish shipyard for an Italian company, the Conte Rosso, was converted into HMS Argus, ...

Britain s Glorious Aircraft Industry

“The rich and diverse history of the British aircraft industry is captured in superb detail by the author in this weighty tome.” —Aviation News Great Britain’s aircraft industry started in 1908, with the first formally registered organization in the world to offer to design and build an aeroplane “for commercial gain.” This book tells the complete story of the 110 years since the start, all the companies formed and the aircraft they produced, highlighting the advances in aeronautical ambition and technology. It is the story of the creation, survival and decline of all one hundred and twenty-three of the aircraft design and construction companies formed between 1908 and 2018. The exhilaration of success and the magic of aviation technology are vividly illustrated by the technical and political birth stories of iconic projects, such as the Cirrus/Gypsy Moths, the Tiger Moth, the flying boats of Imperial Airways, Spitfire, Lancaster, Viscount, Vulcan, Harrier, Buccaneer and many more. The rotary wing industry is not forgotten. The birth of the jet turbine engine and the quest for supersonic speed is included. The stories of the disappointments of failure and disaster, such as the Brabazon, Comet, Princess, Rotodyne and TSR-2, and the growth of international collaboration in Concorde, Tornado, Airbus, Eurofighter Typhoon and other projects are included, in the context of the international scene and domestic politics. The conclusion highlights the prominent reminiscences and speculates on the future of the aircraft industry in Britain. “An outstanding reference book and a thoroughly enjoyable canter through the decades, from the days of wood and fabric to the modern composite structure of the wings of the A400 Atlas.” —RAF Historical Society