British Transport Police Stations

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

British Transport Police Stations

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 103. Chapters: Bristol Temple Meads railway station, London Waterloo station, London Paddington station, London Victoria station, Preston railway station, Birmingham New Street railway station, Euston railway station, Crewe railway station, Manchester Piccadilly station, Leicester railway station, East Croydon station, Finsbury Park station, Newport railway station, Reading railway station, Cardiff Central railway station, Peterborough railway station, Clapham Junction railway station, Plymouth railway station, Brighton railway station, Liverpool Lime Street railway station, Wigan North Western railway station, Exeter St Davids railway station, Shrewsbury railway station, Chester railway station, Southampton Central railway station, Gloucester railway station, Truro railway station, Oxford railway station, Lewisham station, Stoke-on-Trent railway station, Wolverhampton railway station, Guildford railway station, Ashford International railway station, Carlisle railway station, Swansea railway station, Heathrow Terminals 1, 2, 3 tube station, Manchester Airport railway station, Coventry railway station, Lancaster railway station, Bournemouth railway station, Blackpool North railway station, Hastings railway station, Bangor railway station, Portsmouth and Southsea railway station, Dartford railway station. Excerpt: Victoria station, also known as London Victoria, is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex. It is named after nearby Victoria Street and not Queen Victoria. It is the second busiest railway terminus in London (and the UK) after Waterloo, and includes an air terminal for passengers travelling by train to Gatwick Airport. The area around the station has also become an important interchange for other forms of transport: a local bus station is in the forecourt, and a terminal for nationwide...

Anti Terrorism Crime and Security Act 2001

Schedule 7 - Transport police and MoD police : further provisions him an appearance so nearly resembling that of a ... police stations ) , after subsection ( 2 ) insert - " ( 2A ) The Chief Constable of the British Transport Police ...

Anti Terrorism  Crime and Security Act 2001

The aim of the Act is to strengthen powers to counter the increased international terrorist threat in the UK, in the light of the September 11th terrorist attacks in the US. The Act covers issues including: terrorist property, freezing orders, disclosure of information, immigration and asylum, race and religion, the control of toxins, nuclear security, aviation security, police powers, and the retention of communications data. Key measures include new powers to detain those suspected of being terrorists. Changes are also proposed to speed up the asylum process, where the Secretary of State considers the removal of a suspected terrorist would be conducive to the public good. These decisions will be subject to regular independent review by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission, but the decisions of this body will no longer be subject to judicial review

The Railway Police

I have written this book because I feel that they do not get the credit they deserve and are overlooked somewhat and I hope that after you have read this book you will agree with me that we do need the railway police as much as we need any ...

The Railway Police

The book is about the railway police and most readers probably do not realise that it is the oldest police force in the United Kingdom and it can be traced back in history to 1826. I am no doubt that some historians of the Metropolitan Police will disagree. The book will follow the railway police through its history up until the present day and it will give you a flavour of what they are all about and of course what work they get involved in. I think some of you will be very surprised at what they actually do. I have written this book because I feel that they do not get the credit they deserve and are overlooked somewhat and I hope that after you have read this book you will agree with me that we do need the railway police as much as we need any other police.

London Police Stations

The drawing was displayed in the station office until the early 1970s.62 In 1940 the adjacent court was partially ... does appear to be remaining parts of the rear of the building still in use by police or British Transport Police.

London Police Stations

This book is a photographic snapshot of London Metropolitan Police Stations as they stand at a time of great change in the police force and society in general.

PACE A Practical Guide to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984

A chief officer's duty under subsection (1) above is to designate police stations appearing to him to provide enough accommodation for that purpose. The Chief Constable of the British Transport Police Force may designate police stations ...

PACE  A Practical Guide to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984

Providing practical guidance on what remains the single most important statutory basis for police duties and powers in England and Wales - the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) 1984 and its Codes of Practice - this is an essential reference source which the busy police officer or legal practitioner cannot afford to be without. The fifth edition includes all amendments to the Codes of Practice since the last edition, as well as the full text of the Act and Codes of Practice. Explanatory chapters have been updated in line with legislative changes, including the wide-ranging effect of the Policing and Crime Act 2017. With the aid of checklists, flow-charts, and illustrative examples, this book gives excellent guidance on how the procedures and requirements of the Act apply to common, everyday scenarios facing police officers, as well as other persons charged with the investigation of offences. The book forms part of the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series. The series, aimed at all operational officers, consists of practical guides containing clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation and practice, accompanied by case studies, illustrative diagrams, and useful checklists.

Blackstone s Statutes on Evidence

(2A) The Chief Constable of the British Transport Police Force may designate police stations which (in addition to those designated under subsection (1) above) may be used for the purpose of detaining arrested persons.

Blackstone s Statutes on Evidence

'Blackstone's Statutes' have been designed specifically with the law student in mind. Each book has been compiled to meet the needs of specific courses. This work covers evidence.

Personal Passenger Safety in Railway Stations

Q69 Clive Efford: Can I ask Mr Dobbs, you pay for TravelSafe officers who are deployed by the British Transport Police. How effective have these been as compared to fully trained police officers and community support officers in ...

Personal Passenger Safety in Railway Stations

Personal passenger safety in railway Stations : Oral and written evidence, oral evidence taken on Wednesday 19 April 2006

Entanglements of Life with the Law

London Magistrates' Courts Local justice areas Magistrates' courts in this local justice area Police stations that ... London* & Hammersmith* MCs Brewery Road, Central London (British Transport Police), & Hammersmith police stations ...

Entanglements of Life with the Law

This book examines the quality and nature of justice dispensed in London’s magistrates’ courts which are the lowest level of the United Kingdom’s Criminal Justice System. In 2016, approximately 230,000 individuals were prosecuted for a criminal offence in these courts, of whom about seventy percent pleaded guilty and were sentenced. Curiously, about eighty-five percent of those who pleaded ‘not guilty’ were subsequently tried, found guilty and sentenced. This book addresses a central paradox of criminal justice: how is it that magistrates are able to reach a guilty verdict despite the elusive and complex nature of ‘truth’ and reality? Research, together with observations of 238 remand hearings and 23 trials has led the author to arrive at some uncomfortable conclusions about a legal system undermined by government austerity policies and lacking in transparency. This book shows that the police fail to investigate most offences, that the Crown Prosecution Service is reliant on the cases which the police want prosecuted, that the quality of legal representation is poor, that magistrates’ decisions may be unjust, and that most defendants are not able to understand or participate in their hearing. Strikingly, a large percentage of defendants are from London’s ‘precariat’. They are young men who are destitute or who rely on unstable incomes; they are semi-literate, from Black and Ethnic Minority Communities, and their basic rights as citizens are being eroded. Because many are repeat offenders, they are recycled through the Criminal Justice System with limited assistance to address the problems which cause offending. Magistrates’ courts dispense ‘summary justice’ in very short hearings which means that defendants have a limited opportunity to defend themselves. In short, summary justice lacks basic due process rights in a legal process which bears a striking resemblance to ‘justice’ in authoritarian, non-democratic societies.

Blackstone s Statutes on Evidence

(7) For the purposes of this Part a person who— (a) attends a police station to answer to bail granted under section ... (2A) The Chief Constable of the British Transport Police Force may designate police stations which (in addition to ...

Blackstone s Statutes on Evidence

Celebrating over 30 years as the market-leading series, Blackstone's Statutes have an unrivalled tradition of trust and quality. With a rock-solid reputation for accuracy, reliability, and authority, they remain first-choice for students and lecturers, providing a careful selection of all the up-to-date legislation needed for exams and course use.

The Final Years of Cardiff City Police

The mark was to manifest itself much later in his police career when as a senior officer he attempted to put the same ... Within throwing distance was the British Transport Police Station and a swing bridge where ships entering the Bute ...

The Final Years of Cardiff City Police

Follow Cardiff City Police officers on their beats and in their police stations in this informal look at 1950 and 60s life. Anecdotes vary from The Beatles' visits to street prostitution. Why was it called Tiger Bay? And do you remember the iconic pubs not only in the 'bay' but within Cardiff's boundaries?

Tracing Your Railway Ancestors

Railway police, after nationalisation the British Transport Police, had police stations on major railway stations. There were also those who worked behind the scenes, shunting and coupling locomotives and carriages as the train was made ...

Tracing Your Railway Ancestors

Di Drummond's concise and informative guide to Britain's railways will be absorbing reading for anyone who wants to learn about the history of the industry and for family history researchers who want to find out about the careers of their railway ancestors. In a clear and accessible way she guides readers through the social, technical and economic aspects of the story. She describes in vivid detail the rapid growth, maturity and long decline of the railways from the earliest days in the late-eighteenth century to privatization in the 1990s. In the process she covers the themes and issues that family historians, local historians and railway enthusiasts will need to understand in order to pursue their research. A sequence of short, fact-filled chapters gives an all-round view of the development of the railwaysIn addition to tracing the birth and growth of the original railway companies, she portrays the types of work that railwaymen did and pays particular attention to the railway world in which they spent their working lives. The tasks they undertook, the special skills they had to learn, the conditions they worked in, the organization and hierarchy of the railway companies, and the make-up of railway unions - all these elements in the history of the railways are covered. She also introduces the reader to the variety of records that are available for genealogical research - staff records and registers, publications, census returns, biographies and autobiographies, and the rest of the extensive literature devoted to the railway industry.

Voices from a Blue Box

It all started for me on the following morning of earlies when, as front office constable got a telephone call from a British Transport Police officer at Euston Railway Station in London. The officer enquired if we had had a suicide ...

Voices from a Blue Box

In this, the first published book from a lifelong procrastinator, wit and soon to be retired policeman. Bryan Connor, the author, recounts a successful thirty year career with the British Police Service, providing a fascinating insight into the day to day life of a British copper. Delving into selected extracts from the more humorous stories he noted down following his tours of duty. Modern Police Officers are now life guards, crime prevention officers, crime fighters, admin clerks, scenes of crime officers, taxi drivers, social workers, interrogators, gaolers, stewards for sporting events, missing persons specialists, call centre operatives, traffic wardens, first aiders, accurate chronologists, road safety consultants, filing clerks, truancy officers, messengers, fraud investigators, locksmiths, message dispatchers, emergency fire-fighters, road crossing patrol operatives, undertakers, tourist information officers, security officers, youth and community workers, delivery drivers, school liaison officers, street cleaners, first aiders, and sometimes even street patrol beat officers all rolled into one. In other words, they are 'Jacks of all trades and pretty much masters of none'! This book covers some of the tricky situations, embarrassing moments and uncomfortable episodes that quite often arise when some of the people local to or just passing through the busy Borough of Sandwell in the West Midlands of England decided to breach the laws laid down by Her Majesties Government. Bryan's style could best be summed up as......Style, what style? But it is genuine hearty humour with just a hint of sarcasm, Infused with a wealth of peculiar characters. Bryan extracts just some of the more notable episodes in his past, letting you in on some of the more amusing incidents that he and his colleagues had to deal with daily. Only the names and locations have been changed to protect the not so innocent!

The London Underground Serial Killer

No record of the incident could be found in any London Underground or British Transport Police file. Clearly, the station manager was worried that this incident would reflect badly on the station staff and simply wanted it to go away.

The London Underground Serial Killer

The story is now thirty years old and most, if not all, of the characters involved were middle aged men at the time and are now dead. The story did make the national press when it first occurred. A murder in a Police Station is big news and something to beat the Police with. However, when it was found that 12 people had been pushed under underground trains in London by a man that they did not know, the government felt that it might lead to mass hysteria and put a lid on the story with the press.??The officers involved were a small, select, cadre of elite Flying Squad and Serious Crime Squad officers from South London, the same ones who had been dealing with the Krays, Richardsons, Brinks Mat etc. Their methods were unorthodox and recorded in the best selling "Untouchables" book. They were several extreme and unusual and certainly unorthodox, tactics. Officers kidnapped senior Home Office officials and detained them until the Old Bailey judge issued a summons and threatened a warrant in 5 minutes. At the committal the judge, prosecution, defence and everybody had to step over the start witness and he vomitted on the judge's shoes. Witnesses being murdered. Other witnesses being locked up it secret cells to protect them from being murdered.??The Attorney General was satisfied that there was convincing evidence of all 16 murders that Kelly admitted. He was in prison for thirty years with only one or two days between sentences and all the murders co-incided with his absences from prison and before his next arrest. When protected by Police, most had been witnessed. In 12 cases Kelly had presented himself to Police as a star witness who had been talking to the poor depressed man about his unfaithful wife when the train arrived at the station and he jumped underneath it. The widow eventually lost her husband, her reputation, when kelly's story was told to the coroner, and her insurance money, when the death was ruled to be suicide. The A.G. authorised five murders to be charged, and instructed that prosecutions were to be discontinued and the remaining charges left on file as soon as two convictions were secured, as further prosecutions would not be in the public interest, due to their expence.

The Rough Guide to London

The City of London Police are separate fromthe Metropolitan Police andhavea police station at182 ... If there's anincidenton public transport, you should call the British Transport Police,55 BroadwaySW1( 0800405 040, btp.police.uk).

The Rough Guide to London

Following the hugely successful 2012 Olympic games London is more popular than ever, and with The Rough Guide to London you can discover why. In full colour throughout, with dozens of photos to illustrate London's great buildings, iconic landmarks and distinctive neighbourhoods, this guide will show you the best the city has to offer, from the famous Olympic Park to the city's markets and museums, gourmet restaurants and hidden pubs. London has something for everyone - art galleries and shopping arcades, spacious parks and grand palaces - and The Rough Guide to London uncovers it all. Detailed colour maps for each neighbourhood, plus a tube map and practical information on all the essentials, make getting around easy. With chapters dedicated to the best hotels, restaurants and cafés, pubs and bars, live music and clubs, shops, theatre, kids' activities and more, you'll be sure to make the most of your time in the city with The Rough Guide to London. Now available in ePub format.

The Rough Guide to England

The City of London Police are separate from the Metropolitan Police and have a police station at 182 Bishopsgate Liverpool Street; 020/7601 2222, www.cityoflondon.police.uk. If there's an incident on public transport, call the British ...

The Rough Guide to England

The Rough Guide to England is the definitive guide to this fascinating country with clear maps and detailed coverage of all the best attractions in England. Discover England's highlights with stunning photography and information on everything from how best to explore England's beautiful countryside to the country's rich collection of castles, cathedrals and prehistoric remains, with plenty of offbeat attractions along the way. Find detailed practical advice on what to see and do in England, relying on up-to-date reviews of the best hotels and restaurants, the most authentic pubs and clubs, and the most exciting activities and experiences. Accurate maps and comprehensive practical information help you to explore every corner of this superb country, whilst stunning photography makes The Rough Guide to England your ultimate travelling companion. Make the most of your trip with The Rough Guide to England.

Transport security

travelling without fear, oral and written evidence Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Transport Committee ... true of Police , and they have a police station and dedicated measures which are specifically about passenger police ...

Transport security

Incorporating HCP 1085, session 2005-06 and HCP 96, session 2006-07, not previously published

Pocket Rough Guide London

The City of London Police (020 7601 2222, www.cityoflondon.police.uk) are separate from the Metropolitan Police,andhaveapolice station at182 Bishopsgate Liverpool Street. If there's anincident on public transport,callthe British ...

Pocket Rough Guide London

As indispensable as it is easy to carry, the Pocket Rough Guide to London is the definitive guide to the most charismatic city in Britain. It's full of insider tips on the most memorable experiences the city has to offer: take in the views from the lofty heights of the Shard; haggle for a bargain in Portobello Road Market; explore the legacy of the Olympic Games in the East End; and enjoy all manner of world-class museums for free. Beautifully designed in full colour and packed with the best-looking maps you'll find in any guidebook - including a handy pull-out map - Pocket London's comprehensive recommendations will not only help you take best advantage of the city's famed restaurant and nightlife scenes, but also find equally brilliant places to sleep and shop. Now available in ePub format. Make the most of your time on EarthTM with the Pocket Rough Guide London.

FORTY TWO YEARS A SECRET MISTRESS

I had been working as a Custody Visitor, going into police stations unannounced with a colleague to inspect what was going on ... On one occasion I went British Transport Police station at Ebury Bridge in Pimlico and was faced with four ...

FORTY TWO YEARS A SECRET MISTRESS

Jan Prebble was for 42 years the mistress of John Prebble, the writer acclaimed in Scotland for his histories of Glencoe, Culloden and The Highland Clearance, while elsewhere his best known work is the block buster film, Zulu for which he wrote the script. This is not an autobiography written in chronological order but a series of snapshots of a great hot-fired love affair, portraying with humour and feeling some of the difficulties of being a mistress in the days when unmarried couples were not acceptable, the ruses they had to adopt and the extraordinary situations they found themselves in. More than that it takes in not only Jan's own celebrity-interviewing life as a Fleet Street journalist, DJ-protecting days as PRO to Capital Radio and finally her time working for the Prince of Wales, but also fascinating examples of John's unpublished letters, serious and flippant, historical and romantic. It includes untold stories behind his many books and a vivid description of how an author feels when he finishes writing one. The whole story is enhanced by tales of John's sense of fun unexpected perhaps in a man who wrote so eruditely about history.

The Veritas Years

He picked up my suitcase and gently guided me away with his big arm to The British Transport Police station. Unbeknown to me at the time, Mrs Saville was now in a state of total panic, and reduced to a tearful shadow of her former self.

The Veritas Years

When John Ruth arrived in the United Kingdom from Ireland as a boy in the late 1950's. He had little idea of the challenging times that awaited him. With his elder sister Brenda and brother Liam, he was enrolled in a strict Dominican Roman Catholic boarding school at Ponsbourne Park in the remote Hertfordshire countryside. He soon discovered that this place was as cruel, oppressive and mysterious as any five year old child could imagine. He found himself separated from not only his parents, but also his two elder siblings. A few cruel nuns meted out punishment and strict discipline against a backdrop of changing values in those post war years. His harrowing journey continued into the emerging Rock 'n' Roll years that were captivating the youth of the day, and challenging the outdated views and traditions that were held by those in authority. It also describes moving acts of kindness from some of the same nuns who tried to make life easier for many of the unfortunate children in their care. This first part of his story covers his experiences from early childhood to puberty, and captures glimpses of the harshness and occasional brutality of the nuns to some of the more vulnerable children in their care. It illustrates some of the double standards that existed between the haves and have-nots who shared the same education, but certainly not the same privileges.

Rot at the Core

The British Transport Police has offices and police stations of various sizes right across Britain. Officers regularly travel across the country and often find, like the general public, that the BTP office they wish to enter is locked ...

Rot at the Core

In March 1972, four young black men were arrested by a specialist pickpocket squad at Oval Underground Station and charged with theft and assault of police officers. Sentenced to two years in prison, the case seemed straightforward and credible to the judge and jury who convicted them – but these young men were completely innocent, victims of endemic police corruption. The real criminal in this case was the notorious DS Derek Ridgewell, later proven to be heavily involved in organised crime. Graham Satchwell, at one time Britain’s most senior railway detective, has worked with Oval Four victim Winston Trew to reveal the rotten culture that not only enabled Ridgewell to operate as he did, but also to subsequently organise major thefts of property worth in excess of £1 million. Winston Trew’s case was finally overturned in December 2019, but the far-reaching ramifications of Ridgewell’s shocking activities has irreparably damaged many lives and must never be forgotten.