Buddha's Brain

The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom

Buddha's Brain

Jesus, Moses, Mohammed, Gandhi, and the Buddha all had brains built essentially like anyone else's, yet they were able to harness their thoughts and shape their patterns of thinking in ways that changed history. With new breakthroughs in modern neuroscience and the wisdom of thousands of years of contemplative practice, it is possible for us to shape our own thoughts in a similar way for greater happiness, love, compassion, and wisdom. Buddha's Brain joins the forces of modern neuroscience with ancient contemplative teachings to show readers how they can work toward greater emotional well-being, healthier relationships, more effective actions, and deepened religious and spiritual understanding. This book will explain how the core elements of both psychological well-being and religious or spiritual life-virtue, mindfulness, and wisdom--are based in the core functions of the brain: regulating, learning, and valuing. Readers will also learn practical ways to apply this information, as the book offers many exercises they can do to tap the unused potential of the brain and rewire it over time for greater peace and well-being.

BUDDHA'S BRAIN - Summarized for Busy People

The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom: Based on the Book by Rick Hanson

BUDDHA'S BRAIN - Summarized for Busy People

This book summary and analysis was created for individuals who want to extract the essential contents and are too busy to go through the full version. This book is not intended to replace the original book. Instead, we highly encourage you to buy the full version. If you want to change your life, start with your brain. Humans have brains, and this includes great teachers from history like Buddha, Gandhi, Jesus, and Mohammed. However, there is something in their brains that enabled them to change the world. New studies in science inform us that our thoughts determine how our brains work and, in understanding this, we learn that we have the power to control our own brains into a more positive state. Using the powers of the mind in order to create happiness, feel love, and learn wisdom can be done through the combination of neuroscience, psychology, and mindfulness practice. Buddha’s Brain shares the wisdom of the Buddhist tradition in gaining this through mindfulness exercises and guided meditations backed by research on how the brain works and how it can be stimulated to create a better quality of life. Through this book, you will be able to take care of your personal growth that will, ultimately, help you change your whole life. With the power of these three fields, you will be presented with a power that resides within you through practical exercises which you can use to develop your potential that can help you have a peace of mind and life. Wait no more, take action and get this book now!

Summary of Rick Hanson’s Buddha’s Brain by Milkyway Media

Summary of Rick Hanson’s Buddha’s Brain by Milkyway Media

Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom (2009), by Rick Hanson with Richard Mendius, combines the ancient wisdom of the Buddha with the latest breakthroughs in neuroscience. Establishing links between contemplative traditions and scientific research, Buddha’s Brain provides practical advice for readers desiring to strengthen their neural states, reduce stress, and increase well being… Purchase this in-depth summary to learn more.

Brains, Buddhas, and Believing

The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind

Brains, Buddhas, and Believing

Premodern Buddhists are sometimes characterized as veritable "mind scientists" whose insights anticipate modern research on the brain and mind. Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists held that the mental continuum is uninterrupted by death (its continuity is what Buddhists mean by "rebirth"), they would have no truck with the idea that everything about the mental can be explained in terms of brain events. Nevertheless, a predominant stream of Indian Buddhist thought, associated with the seventh-century thinker Dharmakirti, turns out to be vulnerable to arguments modern philosophers have leveled against physicalism. By characterizing the philosophical problems commonly faced by Dharmakirti and contemporary philosophers such as Jerry Fodor and Daniel Dennett, Arnold seeks to advance an understanding of both first-millennium Indian arguments and contemporary debates on the philosophy of mind. The issues center on what modern philosophers have called intentionality—the fact that the mind can be about (or represent or mean) other things. Tracing an account of intentionality through Kant, Wilfrid Sellars, and John McDowell, Arnold argues that intentionality cannot, in principle, be explained in causal terms. Elaborating some of Dharmakirti's central commitments (chiefly his apoha theory of meaning and his account of self-awareness), Arnold shows that despite his concern to refute physicalism, Dharmakirti's causal explanations of the mental mean that modern arguments from intentionality cut as much against his project as they do against physicalist philosophies of mind. This is evident in the arguments of some of Dharmakirti's contemporaneous Indian critics (proponents of the orthodox Brahmanical Mimasa school as well as fellow Buddhists from the Madhyamaka school of thought), whose critiques exemplify the same logic as modern arguments from intentionality. Elaborating these various strands of thought, Arnold shows that seemingly arcane arguments among first-millennium Indian thinkers can illuminate matters still very much at the heart of contemporary philosophy.

Brain Training with the Buddha

A Modern Path to Insight Based on the Ancient Foundations of Mindfulness

Brain Training with the Buddha

The essential guide to training your brain for mindfulness—modern, science-based, and with no Buddhism required. Publisher’s note: Brain Training with the Buddha was previously published in hardcover as The Foundations of Mindfulness. Lifelong meditation teacher Eric Harrison intimately understands the benefits of mindfulness, from improved focus and better judgment to relaxation and inner peace. He’s helped tens of thousands of students to achieve these goals by rooting his practice in the Buddha’s original text on how to meditate and live mindfully: the Satipatthana Sutta. Brain Training with the Buddha offers a secular perspective on this ancient wisdom that requires no familiarity with Buddhism itself—only openness to the Buddha’s original teachings. Harrison’s translation of this sutta (the first in modern English) comes with guidance for anyone looking to train their mind by applying its thirteen steps to mindful living today.

Just One Thing

Developing a Buddha Brain One Simple Practice at a Time

Just One Thing

A follow-up to Buddha's Brain outlines dozens of accessible meditative practices involving techniques that range from promoting relaxation to experiencing gratitude, explaining the neuroscience and psychology behind specific practices and how they can reduce stress and promote inner peace. Original.

Buddha's Neuronet for Levitation

Opening the Lotus of a Thousand Petals

Buddha's Neuronet for Levitation

"If we have just discussed the viable science of levitation - in which that you as a heavy, three-dimensional object vibrating according to the hertz of the planet allows you to have the same stability as mass itself - if suddenly you were to change your field, then the mass that you are made up of would change as well. So it would vibrate; you would still be you but you would be vibrating at another frequency. In other words, we can see you and you are still John Doe, but you are not in the world because you are no longer obeying the laws of gravity and physics here. So you are actually levitating fifteen feet above the floor; we can see you, but you are eating the surrounding time in this time. And while you are sitting there, you are actually in the future. You are in another dimension of time that will one day be your linear future." - Ramtha

One Hundred Tales For Ten Thousand Buddhas

One Hundred Tales For Ten Thousand Buddhas

Meditational experiences of the authoress with Acharya Rajneesh, 1931-1990, Indian spiritual leader.

Buddha's Book of Meditation Deluxe

Mindfulness Practices for a Quieter Mind, Self-Awareness, and Healthy Living

Buddha's Book of Meditation Deluxe

This deluxe edition includes 15 original audio tracks by the author that can be accessed through your device or the web. A journey from “brainfulness” to mindfulness, from self-control to self-regulation, and from indifference to compassion Mindfulness meditation is an increasingly popular form of an ancient and powerful technique for reducing stress, elevating one’s mental state, and improving the practitioner’s overall quality of life. Award-winning author and mindfulness meditation teacher Joseph Emet now takes you down a step-by-step path to integrate this potent form of meditation into your daily life. Offering tips, techniques, and practices from mindfulness meditation—coupled with stories from the author’s life as a teacher—Buddha's Book of Meditation guides you to a life teeming with the benefits of regular meditation practice. This volume also includes original music by the author that the reader can access through their device or the web—calming the mind and enhancing the meditation experience.

Pain

A Textbook for Therapists

Pain

The highly anticipated new edition of Pain: a textbook for health professionals (previous subtitle a textbook for therapists) has undergone a major rewrite in order to reflect the rapid developments in the field of pain management. It highlights an effective and evidence-based method, providing the theoretical basis to help with the assessment and management of persistent pain, while also discussing in depth a range of specific approaches. Pain: a textbook for health professionals is written emphatically from a biopsychosocial perspective. In order to set the scene, the introductory section includes chapters on the patient’s voice and social determinants of pain. This ensures that the deeply personal and social aspects of pain are not lost among the more technical and biological commentary. These aspects provide an overall context, and are revisited in chapters on participation of life roles, work rehabilitation and psychology. The basic science section includes key chapters on the psychology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of pain. This provides a basis for subsequent chapters on specific approaches such as pharmacology, physical therapy and complementary medicine. Pain in specific patient groups, including children, the elderly and those with cancer, are dealt with in separate chapters, as are pain problems such as complex regional pain syndrome and chronic spinal pain. Although the emphasis of the book is on long term pain, acute pain is discussed as a possible precursor and determinant of chronicity. Patient-centred approach to care – advocates listening to the patient’s voice Covers social determinants of pain Guides the reader from pain psychology to the practical application of psychological interventions Learning aids – chapter objectives, reflective exercises, case examples, and revision questions Emphasizes an evidence-based perspective Written by an international team of experts topics such as pain in children and the elderly, pain education for professionals, disability and medico-legal aspects expanded focus on complex regional pain syndrome, acupuncture and psychology improved layout for a better learning and studying experience