Business for Bohemians

Live Well, Make Money

Business for Bohemians

Everyone should work for themselves. But don't cashflow forecasts, tax returns and P&Ls all sound a bit of a faff? Fear not: help is at hand. In Business for Bohemians, Tom Hodgkinson combines practical advice with laugh-out-loud anecdote to create a refreshingly candid guidebook for all of us who aspire to a greater degree of freedom in our working lives. Whether you dream of launching your own startup or profiting from your creativity in your spare time, Business for Bohemians will equip you with the tools to turn your talents into a profitable and enjoyable business. Accounting need no longer be a dark art. You will become au fait with business plans and a friend of the spreadsheet. You will discover that laziness can be a virtue. Above all, you will realise that freedom from the nine-to-five life is achievable - and, with Hodgkinson's comforting, pragmatic and extremely funny advice at hand, you might even enjoy yourself along the way. Tom Hodgkinson is the founder and editor of The Idler and the bestselling author of How to be Idle, How to be Free, The Idle Parent and Brave Old World. In 2011 he and his partner Victoria opened the Idler Academy in London, an independent bookshop, coffeehouse and cultural centre which offers online and real-world courses in everything from philosophy and calligraphy to business skills and self-defence.

Business for Bohemians: Live Well, Make Money

Business for Bohemians: Live Well, Make Money

The 4-Hour Work Week meets Monty Python—the ultimate, entertaining handbook for controlling your work destiny and enjoying yourself along the way Ready to be your own boss? If cash flow forecasts, tax returns, and P&Ls sound horrifying, fear not: help is at hand. Journalist Tom Hogkinson has spent his career advocating for laid-back living, and in Business for Bohemians, he combines practical advice with hilarious anecdotes to create a refreshingly candid guidebook for all of us who aspire to a greater degree of freedom in our working lives. Whether you dream of launching your own graphic design startup or growing your Etsy store into a full-scale operation in your spare time, Business for Bohemians will equip you with the tools to turn your talents into a profitable and enjoyable business. Accounting need no longer be a dark art. You will become a social media maven and a friend of the spreadsheet. You will learn the art of negotiation, how to get paid, and how to decide which clients to take. You will discover that laziness can be a virtue. Above all, you will realize that freedom from the nine-to-five life is achievable—and, with Hodgkinson’s comforting, pragmatic and extremely funny advice at hand, you might even enjoy yourself along the way.

Business for Bohemians

Make Your Creativity Pay

Business for Bohemians

Everyone should work for themselves. But don't cashflow forecasts, tax returns and P&Ls all sound a bit of a faff? Fear not: help is at hand. In Business for Bohemians, Tom Hodgkinson combines practical advice with laugh-out-loud anecdote to create a refreshingly candid guidebook for all of us who aspire to a greater degree of freedom in our working lives. Whether you dream of launching your own startup or profiting from your creativity in your spare time, Business for Bohemians will equip you with the tools to turn your talents into a profitable and enjoyable business. Accounting need no longer be a dark art. You will become au fait with business plans and a friend of the spreadsheet. You will discover that laziness can be a virtue. Above all, you will realise that freedom from the nine-to-five life is achievable - and, with Hodgkinson's comforting, pragmatic and extremely funny advice at hand, you might even enjoy yourself along the way. Tom Hodgkinson is the founder and editor of The Idler and the bestselling author of How to be Idle, How to be Free, The Idle Parent and Brave Old World. In 2011 he and his partner Victoria launched the Idler Academy of Philosophy, Husbandry and Merriment, a business which offers online and real-world courses in the liberal arts and practical skills, from philosophy and ukulele to business skills and singing.

Youth in Modern Society

Youth in Modern Society


Looking for America

Essays on Youth, Suburbia and Other American Obsessions

Looking for America


Babbitts and Bohemians from the Great War to the Great Depression

Babbitts and Bohemians from the Great War to the Great Depression

Babbitts and Bohemians is a fresh and informed account of the 1920s, a decade that seems almost mythical to some. Elizabeth Stevenson finds that the true twenties was a society of contrast. On the one hand, it was an era of sameness and political conformity, but on the other hand, it was also a time of cultural revolt. In places labeled Main Street and Middletown the citizenry followed a conventional pattern. At the same time, while most of America enjoyed the good life of this period, bohemians in Greenwich Village and expatriates in Paris were fervently scornful of it. The author explores the new sense of self and the world during this period, especially evident in the writings of Sinclair Lewis, Sherwood Anderson, Robert Frost, H. L. Mencken, Glenway Wescott, William Faulkner, and others. Stevenson writes about numerous facets of the 1920s: the brilliant entertainers, Harlem's brief period of glory, the worsening conditions in the South, the hero worship of Babe Ruth and Charles Lindbergh, and the stockmarket crash in 1929 that brought an abrupt end to the golden years. In the new introduction, the author reflects on her personal experience and discusses how the 1920s affected her family. She goes on to talk about how living in the tumultuous 1960s prompted her to write Babbitts and Bohemians. While she concedes that there were some not so glorious times during the 1920s, she still considers it a period where the vitality of life exhibited itself in all sorts of interesting and entertaining new ways. Elizabeth Stevenson succeeds admirably in conveying the spirit and the history of the era: the people and the mood that shaped the times; the political, international, and economic apathy; the conformity and rebellion of a decade unlike any other before or since. Babbitts and Bohemians will be enjoyed by all, especially historians, sociologists, and political scientists.

Report of the Select Committee of the House of Representatives to Inquire Into the Alleged Violation of the Laws Prohibiting the Importation of Contract Laborers, Paupers, Convicts and Other Classes, Together with the Testimony, Documents and Consular Reports Submitted to the Committee

Report of the Select Committee of the House of Representatives to Inquire Into the Alleged Violation of the Laws Prohibiting the Importation of Contract Laborers, Paupers, Convicts and Other Classes, Together with the Testimony, Documents and Consular Reports Submitted to the Committee


Garretts & Pretenders

A History of Bohemianism in America

Garretts & Pretenders

Published in 1933, the first edition of this classic narrative chronicled the lives of America's bohemians, from Edgar Allen Poe in the early 1800s to Walt Whitman and Ambrose Bierce. The book caused a sensation when it was released in March 1933, with reviews and excerpts printed in magazines such as Esquire, American Mercury, and other popular titles of the time. Complete with a comprehensive index, the book was a major historical source for many years. This updated edition, first published in 1960, includes a meticulous and well-researched account of the Beat Generation, from Jack Kerouac to Allen Ginsberg, and their literary achievements. Not merely a sentimental collection of tales of days gone by, this is a fascinating study of vibrant and eccentric times. Complete with cartoons, illustrations, and photographs, this is an accurate depiction of the lives and manners of America's bohemians. AUTHOR BIO: Albert Parry was the author of the landmark 1933 book Tattoo, Secrets of a Strange Art as Practised by the Natives of the United States, and was an early contributor to the "reefer madness" craze with his article "The Menace of Marihuana" in the December 1935 issue of American Mercury.

Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells

The Best of Early Vanity Fair

Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells

Offering readers an inebriating swig from the great cocktail shaker of the Roaring Twenties—the Jazz Age, the age of Gatsby—Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers, and Swells showcases unforgettable writers in search of how to live well in a changing era. Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter introduces these fabulous pieces written between 1913 and 1936, when the magazine published a Murderers’ Row of the world’s leading literary lights, including: F. Scott Fitzgerald on what a magazine should be Clarence Darrow on equality e. e. cummings on Calvin Coolidge D. H. Lawrence on women Djuna Barnes on James Joyce John Maynard Keynes on the collapse in money value Dorothy Parker on a host of topics, from why she hates actresses to why she hasn’t married