Butterfly Boy

Memories of a Chicano Mariposa

Butterfly Boy

Winner of the American Book Award

The Butterfly Boy

The Butterfly Boy

The Butterfly Boy marks the debut as a novelist of Richard Cawley, television chef (That's Entertaining, Ready Steady Cook) and food writer (The Artful Cook, The New English Cookery, Not Quite Vegetarian) reflecting his own peripatetic life. This accomplished tale is rooted in Australia but includes excursions to London, Provence and the Italian riviera. Michael is about to celebrate his fortieth birthday but he is still recovering from the death of his lover of twelve years and his return to Sydney's bars and clubs is at best wary. Whilst having drinks with friends, Michael sees for the first time a tall, skinny and black -clad youth whom he immediately nicknames 'the butterfly boy'. It is a fateful moment -- the beginning of an obsession at times idyllic, at times painful, sometimes destructive. And the Butterfly Boy -- beautiful, capricious, sexy -- propels him into the world of high fashion, art and music as he flits -- butterfly like -- from admirer to admirer. Vividly evoking the gay socialwhirl of Sydney, the tranquillity of a small Provencal town and the excesses of riviera life, Richard Cawley has created a lushly romantic novel peopled by a clutch of unforgettable characters who remain with the reader long after his tale has been told.

The Butterfly Boy

The Butterfly Boy

A boy in long-ago China sees the world around him from a butterfly's point of view. Based on the writings of philosopher Chuang Tzu.

Butterfly Stories

A Novel

Butterfly Stories

Butterfly Stories follows a dizzying cradle-to-grave hunt for love that takes the narrator from the comfortable confines of suburban America to the killing fields of Cambodia, where he falls in love with Vanna, a prostitute from Phnom Penh. Here, Vollmann's gritty style perfectly serves his examination of sex, violence, and corruption.

Enough About You

Notes Toward the New Autobiography

Enough About You

What does it mean to construct a self? What does it mean to turn your life into a narrative? What’s gained? What’s lost? What lies inevitably get told? What deeper truths are reached or at least reached for? Enough About You has no answers to these questions, but it frames and asks these questions in a much more overt, honest, precise, and provocative way than any book has attempted yet, and tries to do so while also delivering the pleasures of narrative, of memoir, of search-for-self. With moving and often hilarious candor, Shields explores the connections between fiction and nonfiction, stuttering and writing, literary forms and literary contents, art and life; he confronts bad reviews of his earlier books; he examines why he read a college girlfriend’s journal; he raids a wide range of cultural figures (from Rousseau, Nabokov, and Salinger to Bill Murray, Adam Sandler, and Bobby Knight) for what they have to tell him about himself. Enough About You is a book about David Shields. But it is also a terrifically engrossing exploration and exploitation of self-reflection, self-absorption, full-blown narcissism, and the impulse to write about oneself. In a world awash with memoirs and tell-alls, Shields has created something unique: he invites the reader into his mind as he turns his life into a narrative.

Assessing Children in the Urban Community

Assessing Children in the Urban Community

This book illuminates the process of child psychological assessment in community psychology through discussion, theory, and case studies of collaborative, systemic treatment of children and their parents. "Assessing Children in the Urban Community" presents a semi-structured form of collaborative psychological assessment, designed to help clients gain new insights and make changes in their lives. Traditional psychological assessment focuses on diagnosis and treatment but has been slow to include contextual elements, particularly social and cultural contexts into the assessment process and psychological report. Clients receiving services in a community psychology clinic pay for their treatment through state welfare coverage. They cannot choose their providers, they cannot always determine the length and course of their mental health care, they often do not have access to transportation to begin services, to continue them, or to take advantage of follow-up recommendations. The Therapeutic Assessment model is particularly adaptable to community psychology because it allows maximum interaction in the assessment process and promotes participation and collaboration in an often dis-empowering system. This book will be relevant to clinical psychologists, community psychologists, social workers, family therapists, graduate students in psychology, social work, marriage and family therapists, and counseling programs.

Storytelling in the Classroom

Enhancing Traditional Oral Skills for Teachers and Pupils

Storytelling in the Classroom

`Too afraid to have a go at oral storytelling in the classroom? This is the book for you!...The book guides you through choosing a tale you really enjoy, knowing your audience and not being afraid to adapt a tried and tested fairy tale' - Literacy Time `This book is ideal for all adults working with children (mainly at primary level) and would be especially useful for those less confident or who are new to their role. It provides a great opportunity to practise an inspirational and creative approach to teaching and learning...I really enjoyed this book and took away much to think about' - Ruth Underwood, primary inclusion co-ordinator `The ability level for this book is aimed at teachers teaching ages 5-11 and I'd say the author has it spot on. As an educational resource I rate this book highly and think it is a valuable read for all primary teachers. It helps you to think of how you can use storytelling as a tool in ways you won't have thought of before. It's a very enjoyable read and if you're pushed for time you can just dip into the parts you want. I definitely recommend it' - TES website Drawing on her experience as a professional storyteller, in this book, Alison Davies show teachers how to develop storytelling skills as part of a new engaging approach to creative teaching and learning. Packed with hands on, practical advice, the book also includes a range of stories for teachers to use in different class situations. The stories are in an easy to learn format, with pointers and tips on how to tell them and how to involve the class. Topics covered include: - bullying - disabilities - computer games - friendship - greed There are also lots of lesson plans with ideas for starters, mains and plenary sessions, and tips on developing creativity and presentation of ideas in an engaging manner to suit any topic or situation across the curriculum. As well as giving the reader the opportunity to practice their new skills and giving them the confidence to develop their own stories, the activities help them to develop these skills in young people. The book is ideal for teachers, teaching assistants, youth club workers-anyone in a primary level setting who has the opportunity to develop storytelling as a creative and inspirational experience. Alison Davies has also edited Shrouded in Darkness: Tales of Terror to raise money for DebRA, a national charity working on behalf of people with the genetic skin blistering condition, Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB). The book features contributions from from Neil Gaiman, Clive Barker, Christopher Fowler, Simon Clark and Graham Masterton. All royalties from this book will go to the charity to help them continue their good work. Please click on this link to view details of this book.