C W Von Gluck Orfeo

Calzabigi and Gluck It is not easy to establish what happened between Gluck and Calzabigi in the year 1762. Neither was reluctant to talk about the collaboration . But most of the sources date from some years after Orfeo had become an ...

C  W  Von Gluck  Orfeo

This book explores all aspects of Gluck's historically important opera Orfeo.

Christoph Willibald Gluck

Orfeo ed Euridice. Some Criticisms, Revisions and StageRealizations during Gluck's Life-Time.” Chigiana (item 86): 383—394. Traces the early history of Orfeo, dealing chiefly with the first performances in Vienna, the engraving of the ...

Christoph Willibald Gluck

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Opera Lover s Companion

CHRISTOPH WILLIBALD GLUCK ( b . Erasbach , 1714 - d . Vienna , 1787 ) Orfeo ed Euridice ( Orpheus and Eurydice ) opera in three acts ( approximate length : 1 hour , 45 minutes ) Orfeo ( Orpheus ) mezzo - soprano ; originally alto ...

The Opera Lover s Companion

Written by a well-known authority, this book consists of 175 entries that set some of the most popular operas within the context of their composer's career, outline the plot, discuss the music, and more.

The Lyric Myth of Voice

Calzabigi, letter to the Mercure de France, 25 June 1784; quoted and translated in Howard, C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo, 24–25. Regarding the many musical influences on Gluck's vocal writing in Orfeo, including opéra comique and ballet, ...

The Lyric Myth of Voice

How did "voice" become a metaphor for selfhood in the Western imagination? The Lyric Myth of Voice situates the emergence of an ideological connection between voice and subjectivity in late eighteenth-century Italy, where long-standing political anxieties and new notions of cultural enlightenment collided in the mythical figure of the lyric poet-singer. Ultimately, music and literature together shaped the singing voice into a tool for civilizing modern Italian subjects. Drawing on a range of approaches and frameworks from historical musicology to gender studies, disability studies, anthropology, and literary theory, Jessica Gabriel Peritz shows how this ancient yet modern myth of voice attained interpretable form, flesh, and sound. The publisher gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the AMS 75 PAYS Fund of the American Musicological Society, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Nervous Reactions

See Eve Bar- sham, “Berlioz and Gluck,” in C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo, ed. Patricia Howard (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), 95. 30. Eliot, Armgart, 288. 31. Charles Ancillon, Eunuchism Displayed (London: E. Curll, 1718), 31.

Nervous Reactions

Addresses how Victorian receptions of Romanticism and Romantic writers were shaped by notions of "nervousness."

E T A Hoffmann s Musical Aesthetics

"From Garrick to Gluck: The Reform of Theatre and Opera in the Mid-Eighteenth Century, Proceedings of the Royal Musical Association 94 (1967–8): 111–27; Patricia Howard, C. W. von Gluck. Orfeo (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ...

E T A  Hoffmann s Musical Aesthetics

Whilst E.T.A. Hoffmann (1776-1822) is most widely known as the author of fantastic tales, he was also prolific as a music critic, productive as a composer, and active as a conductor. This book examines Hoffmann's aesthetic thought within the broader context of the history of ideas of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, and explores the relationship between his musical aesthetics and compositional practice. The first three chapters consider his ideas about creativity and aesthetic appreciation in relation to the thought of other German romantic theorists, discussing the central tenets of his musical aesthetic - the idea of a 'religion of art', of the composer as a 'genius', and the listener as a 'passive genius'. In particular the relationship between the multifaceted thought of Hoffmann and Friedrich Schleiermacher is explored, providing some insight into the way in which diverse intellectual traditions converged in early-nineteenth-century Germany. In the second half of the book, Hoffmann's dialectical view of music history and his conception of romantic opera are discussed in relation to his activities as a composer, with reference to his instrumental music and his two mature, large-scale operas, Aurora and Undine. The author also addresses broader issues pertaining to the ideological and historical significance of Hoffmann's musical and literary oeuvre.

The Collected Writings of Franz Liszt

First Performance: Documentary,” in C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo, ed. Patricia Howard, Cambridge Opera Handbooks (Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1981), 53-56, and Patricia Howard, Gluck: An Eighteenth-Century ...

The Collected Writings of Franz Liszt

In Dramaturgical Leaves: Essays about Musical Works for the Stage and Queries about the Stage, Its Composers and Performers, the third volume in Janita R. Hall-Swadley’s The Collected Writings of Franz Liszt, Liszt heralds his admiration for early nineteenth-century opera and musical stage works. Included are essays on Gluck’s Orpheus, Beethoven’s Fidelio, Weber’s Euryanthe, Mendelssohn’s Midsummer’s Night Dream, Scribe and Meyerbeer’s Robert the Devil, Schubert’s Alfonso and Estrella, Auber’s Mute from Portici, Bellini’s Montague and Capulet, Boieldieu’s White Lady, and Donizetti’s Favorite as well as essays on soprano Pauline Viardot-Garcia and Liszt’s critique of entr’acte music. This volume includes a detailed discussion of Liszt’s impact as a musical patron, a historical review of entr’acte music, the role of gender in opera, and Liszt’s concepts of Gestalt theory, the Archetype, and his musical Weltanschauung (his musical "world view"), all revealing his contribution to 19th-century music philosophy as it relates to opera.

Under the Spell of Orpheus

Christoph Willibald Gluck , Orpheus , trans . Edward J. Dent ( London : Oxford University Press , 1941 ) , 18. On the opera , see Patricia Howard , C. W. von Gluck : " Orfeo " ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1981 ) ...

Under the Spell of Orpheus

This comprehensive view of the Orpheus myth in modern art focuses on an extremely rich artistic symbol and cuts through all the clichés to explore truly significant problems of meaning. The author takes a new approach to the iconography of major modern artists by incorporating psychological and literary analysis, as well as biography. The three parts of the book explore the ways in which artists have identified with different aspects of the often paradoxical Orpheus myth. The first deals with artists such as Paul Klee, Carl Milles, and Barbara Hepworth. In the second, Max Beckmann, Oskar Kokoschka, and Isamu Noguchi are discussed. Artists examined in the final part include Pablo Picasso, Jacques Lipchitz, Ethel Schwabacher, and Cy Twombly. The author documents her argument with more than sixty illustrations.

Liszt and the Symphonic Poem

77 Patricia Howard, Gluck and the Birth of Modern Opera (London: Barrie and Rockliff, 1963),90. 78 Ibid., 90. 79 Howard, C. W. Von Gluck: Orfeo, 27. 80 Wagner, 'Gluck's Overture to “Iphigenia in Aulis”', ...

Liszt and the Symphonic Poem

Franz Liszt was preoccupied with a fundamental but difficult question: what is the content of music? His answer lay in his symphonic poems, a group of orchestral pieces intended to depict a variety of subjects drawn from literature, visual art and drama. Today, the symphonic poems are usually seen as alternatives to the symphony post-Beethoven. Analysts stress their symphonic logic, thereby neglecting their 'extramusical' subject matter. This book takes a different approach: it returns these influential pieces to their original performance context in the theatre, arguing that the symphonic poem is as much a dramatic as a symphonic genre. This is evidenced in new analyses of the music that examines the theatricality of these pieces and their depiction of voices, mise-en-scène, gesture and action. Simultaneously, the book repositions Liszt's legacy within theatre history, arguing that his contributions should be placed alongside those of Mendelssohn, Berlioz and Wagner.

Cultural Histories of Noise Sound and Listening in Europe 1300 1918

51 Christoph Willibald Gluck, Orfeo ed Euridice, Sämtliche Werke, eds Anna Amalie Abert and Ludwig Finscher, series I, ... 53 See Calzabigi's letter to Prince Kaunitz dated 6 March 1767, quoted in Patricia Howard, C.W. von Gluck: Orfeo ...

Cultural Histories of Noise  Sound and Listening in Europe  1300   1918

Cultural Histories of Noise, Sound and Listening in Europe, 1300-1918 presents a range of historical case studies on the sounding worlds of the European past. The chapters in this volume explore ways of thinking about sound historically, and seek to understand how people have understood and negotiated their relationships with the sounding world in Europe from the Middle Ages through to the early twentieth century. They consider, in particular: sound and music in the later Middle Ages; the politics of sound in the early modern period; the history of the body and perception during the Ancien Régime; and the sounds of the city in the nineteenth century and sound and colonial rule at the fin de siècle. The case studies also range in geographical orientation to include considerations not only of Britain and France, the countries most considered in European historical sound studies in English-language scholarship to date, but also Bosnia-Herzegovina, British Colonial India, Germany, Italy and Portugal. Out of this diverse group of case studies emerge significant themes that recur time and again, varying according to time and place: sound, power and identity; sound as a marker of power or violence; and sound, physiology and sensory perception and technologies of sound, consumption and meaning.

Reader s Guide to Music

... and New York: St. Martin's Press, 1963 Howard, Patricia, editor, C.W. von Gluck: Orfeo, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981 Newman, Ernest, Gluck and the Opera: A Study in Musical History, London: Dobbell, 1895; reprint, ...

Reader s Guide to Music

The Reader's Guide to Music is designed to provide a useful single-volume guide to the ever-increasing number of English language book-length studies in music. Each entry consists of a bibliography of some 3-20 titles and an essay in which these titles are evaluated, by an expert in the field, in light of the history of writing and scholarship on the given topic. The more than 500 entries include not just writings on major composers in music history but also the genres in which they worked (from early chant to rock and roll) and topics important to the various disciplines of music scholarship (from aesthetics to gay/lesbian musicology).

Perspectives on Mozart Performance

Of course , each comExample 30 Joseph Haydn , Pauken Mass , Sanctus Adagio Example 31 C. W. Gluck , Orfeo , “ J'ai perdu mon Eurydice ' Andante Orfeo J'ai perdu mon Eu · ry · di · ce Example 32 C. W. Gluck , Orfeo , Act III trio Andante ...

Perspectives on Mozart Performance

This book includes essays by distinguished musicologists and performers, each exploring a different aspect of Mozart's music in performance.

Engaging Haydn

... his libretto for Haydn's debut there.18 His Orpheus 1“ Jon Solomon, “The Neoplatonic Apotheosis in Monteverdi's Orfeo,” Studi musicali 24 (1995), 27-47; and Patricia Howard, C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo (Cambridge University Press, 1981).

Engaging Haydn

Haydn is enjoying renewed appreciation: this book explores fresh approaches to his music and the cultural forces affecting it.

The Grove Book of Opera Singers

Early in 1762 he went to Vienna, where he made his début as Horatius in Johann Hasse's Il trionfo di Clelia and a month later sang Bacchus in C.W. Gluck's Arianna. On 5 October 1762 he created the title role in C.W. Gluck's Orfeo ed ...

The Grove Book of Opera Singers

Spanning from the birth of opera to the present day, a comprehensive musical reference features biographical profiles of more than 1,500 singers, alphabetically organized for easy access, that range from Marian Anderson to Benedict Zak, with basic biographical data, vocal style, memorable roles, and assessment of their place in operatic history for each.

The 17th and 18th Centuries

C. W. von Gluck: “Orfeo. ” Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981. A series of substantial essays by various authors addressing the first and most famous of Gluck's reform operas. The essays can be grouped into the ...

The 17th and 18th Centuries

Each volume of the Dictionary of World Biography contains 250 entries on the lives of the individuals who shaped their times and left their mark on world history. This is not a who's who. Instead, each entry provides an in-depth essay on the life and career of the individual concerned. Essays commence with a quick reference section that provides basic facts on the individual's life and achievements. The extended biography places the life and works of the individual within an historical context, and the summary at the end of each essay provides a synopsis of the individual's place in history. All entries conclude with a fully annotated bibliography.

Painting the Cannon s Roar

For a balanced account of the relationship between Calzabigi and Gluck, see Patricia Howard, C.W. von Gluck: Orfeo (Cambridge, 1981), 22–26. In a letter to the Mercure de France (Vienna, 1 Feb. 1773), Gluck gave Calzabigi the main ...

Painting the Cannon s Roar

From c.1750 to c.1810 the paths of music history and the history of painting converged with lasting consequences. The publication of Newton's Opticks at the start of the eighteenth century gave a 'scientific' basis to the analogy between sight and sound, allowing music and the visual arts to be defined more closely in relation to one another. This was also a period which witnessed the emergence of a larger and increasingly receptive audience for both music and the visual arts - an audience which potentially included all social strata. The development of this growing public and the commercial potential that it signified meant that for the first time it became possible for a contemporary artist to enjoy an international reputation. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the career of Joseph Haydn. Although this phenomenon defies conventional modes of study, the book shows how musical pictorialism became a major creative force in popular culture. Haydn, the most popular living cultural personality of the period, proved to be the key figure in advancing the new relationship. The connections between the composer and his audiences and leading contemporary artists (including Tiepolo, Mengs, Kauffman, Goya, David, Messerschmidt, Loutherbourg, Canova, Copley, Fuseli, Reynolds, Gillray and West) are examined here for the first time. By the early nineteenth century, populism was beginning to be regarded with scepticism and disdain. Mozart was the modern Raphael, Beethoven the modern Michelangelo. Haydn, however, had no clear parallel in the accepted canon of Renaissance art. Yet his recognition that ordinary people had a desire to experience simultaneous aural and visual stimulation was not altogether lost, finding future exponents in Wagner and later still in the cinematic arts.

Reading Critics Reading

Eve Barsham's " The Opera in the Nineteenth Century ' , in Patricia Howard , C. W. von Gluck : ' Orfeo ' ( Cambridge , 1981 ) , 84-97 , is exclusively based on Berlioz ; reference to Castil - Blaze is restricted to a summary of the 19 ...

Reading Critics Reading

Opera and ballet criticism in early 19th century France are examined in new ways here, with the motivations and beliefs of journalist critics being taken seriously. The essays look at the backgrounds that led critics to write as they did.

Queering the Pitch

John Eliot Gardiner, “Hands Off 'Orfeo!'” and Tom Hammond, “'Orphée et Euridice': Gluck's final solution” and “A note on the aria di bravura 'L'espoir renaît dans mon âme'” in Patricia Howard, ed., C. W. von Gluck: Orfeo, ...

Queering the Pitch

When the first edition of Queering the Pitch was published in early 1994, it was immediately hailed as a landmark and defining work in the new field of Gay Musicology. In light of the explosion of Gay Musicology since 1994, a new edition of Queering the Pitch is timely and needed. In this new work, the editors are including a landmark essay by Philip Brett on Gay Musicology, its history and scope. The essay itself has become a cause celebre, and this will be its first full appearance in print. Along with this new historical essay, the editors are contributing a new introduction that outlines the changes that have occurred over the last decade as Gay Musicology has grown.

The Politics of Opera

For the summary of Calzabigi's life, see Patricia Howard, C.W. Gluck, Orfeo (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), p. 16 and Brue Alan Brown, Gluck and the French Theater in Vienna (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991), p.

The Politics of Opera

A wide-ranging look at the interplay of opera and political ideas through the centuries The Politics of Opera takes readers on a fascinating journey into the entwined development of opera and politics, from the Renaissance through the turn of the nineteenth century. What political backdrops have shaped opera? How has opera conveyed the political ideas of its times? Delving into European history and thought and music by such greats as Monteverdi, Lully, Rameau, and Mozart, Mitchell Cohen reveals how politics—through story lines, symbols, harmonies, and musical motifs—has played an operatic role both robust and sotto voce. This is an engrossing book that will interest all who love opera and are intrigued by politics.