The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self criticism in the European Middle Ages

Callimachus In addition to Stesichorus ' , Socrates ' , and Euripides ' external concerns about blindness and death , the recantation tradition draws on the Hellenistic - influenced poetry that reaches from Alexandrian times to ...

The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self criticism in the European Middle Ages

This study outlines the history and anatomy of the European apology tradition from the sixth century BCE to 1500 for the first time. The study examines the vernacular and Latin tales, lyrics, epics, and prose compositions of Arabic, English, French, German, Greek, Icelandic, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh authors. Three different strands of the apology tradition can be proposed. The first and most pervasive strand features apologies to pagan deities and-later-to God. The second most important strand contains literary apologies made to an earthly audience, usually of women. A third strand occurs more rarely and contains apologies for varying literary offenses that are directed to a more general audience. The medieval theory of language privileges an imitation of the Christian master narrative and a hierarchical medieval view of authorship. These notions express a medieval philosophical concern about language and its role, and therefore the role of the author, in cosmic history. Despite the fact that women apologize for different purposes and reasons, their examples illustrate, on yet another level, the antifeminist subtext inherent in the entire apology tradition. Overall, the apology tradition characterized by interauctoriality, intertextuality, and intratextuality, enables self-critical authors to refer not only backward but also-primarily-forward, making the medieval apology a progressive strategy that engenders new literature. This study would be relevant to all medievalists, especially those interested in literature and the history of ideas.

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature Volume 1 Greek Literature

CALLIMACHUS The most outstanding intellect of this generation , the greatest poet that the Hellenistic age produced ... was the third writer who had particular responsibility for organizing the Museum Library , Callimachus of Cyrene .

The Cambridge History of Classical Literature  Volume 1  Greek Literature

This volume looks at literature of the Hellenistic period.

Inconsistency in Roman Epic

Part of the formal complexity of Callimachus' Hymn to Artemis and Theocritus' Hymn to the Dioscuri is signaled for the reader by the use of different models. In other poems the relationship to earlier literature involves ...

Inconsistency in Roman Epic

How should we react as readers and as critics when two passages in a literary work contradict one another? Classicists once assumed that all inconsistencies in ancient texts needed to be amended, explained away, or lamented. Building on recent work on both Greek and Roman authors, this book explores the possibility of interpreting inconsistencies in Roman epic. After a chapter surveying Greek background material including Homer, tragedy, Plato and the Alexandrians, five chapters argue that comparative study of the literary use of inconsistencies can shed light on major problems in Catullus' Peleus and Thetis, Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Vergil's Aeneid, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and Lucan's Bellum Civile. Not all inconsistencies can or should be interpreted thematically, but numerous details in these poems, and some ancient and modern theorists, suggest that we can be better readers if we consider how inconsistencies may be functioning in Greek and Roman texts.

The New Posidippus

12 Battle of the Books SUSAN STEPHENS 3 At the opening of his long elegiac poem , the Aitia , Callimachus labels his critics ' Telchines ' , a term that links them with antiquated ways and malevolent behaviour .

The New Posidippus

The Milan Papyrus ( P. Mil. Volg. VIII. 309), containing a collection of epigrams apparently all by Posidippus of Pella, provides one of the most exciting new additions to the corpus of Greek literature in decades. It not only contains over 100 previously unknown epigrams by one of the most prominent poets of the third century BC, but as an artefact it constitutes our earliest example of a Greek poetry book. In addition to a poetic translation of the entire corpus of Posidippus'poetry, this volume contains essays about Posidippus by experts in the fields of papyrology, Hellenistic and Augustan literature, Ptolemaic history, and Graeco-Roman visual culture.

The Fortnightly Review

A pagan named Callimachus has fallen in love with a Christian married woman , Prusania , and she from the bottom of her heart returns the love of the beautiful youth ; but as she desires to struggle against her passion , and yet fears ...

The Fortnightly Review


A Companion to Catullus

The translation by Nisetich (2001) makes Callimachus' works accessible to the Greekless, including many fragments not translated in the Loeb edition and several new papyri. A major re-evaluation by Alan Cameron (1995) has called into ...

A Companion to Catullus

In this companion, international scholars provide a comprehensive overview that reflects the most recent trends in Catullan studies. Explores the work of Catullus, one of the best Roman ‘lyric poets’ Provides discussions about production, genre, style, and reception, as well as interpretive essays on key poems and groups of poems Grounds Catullus in the socio-historical world around him Chapters challenge received wisdom, present original readings, and suggest new interpretations of biographical evidence

Index A History of the

It would be a man named Callimachus, armed with the twenty-four letters of the alphabet, who would bring the sprawling library to heel. Callimachus is best known today for his verse. He is the author of the elegy to a fellow poet, ...

Index  A History of the

'Hilarious' Sam Leith 'I loved this book' Susie Dent' 'Witty and affectionate' Lynne Truss Perfect for book lovers, a delightful history of the wonders to be found in the humble book index Most of us give little thought to the back of the book - it's just where you go to look things up. But here, hiding in plain sight, is an unlikely realm of ambition and obsession, sparring and politicking, pleasure and play. Here we might find Butchers, to be avoided, or Cows that sh-te Fire, or even catch Calvin in his chamber with a Nonne. This is the secret world of the index: an unsung but extraordinary everyday tool, with an illustrious but little-known past. Here, for the first time, its story is told. Charting its curious path from the monasteries and universities of thirteenth-century Europe to Silicon Valley in the twenty-first, Dennis Duncan reveals how the index has saved heretics from the stake, kept politicians from high office and made us all into the readers we are today. We follow it through German print shops and Enlightenment coffee houses, novelists' living rooms and university laboratories, encountering emperors and popes, philosophers and prime ministers, poets, librarians and - of course - indexers along the way. Revealing its vast role in our evolving literary and intellectual culture, Duncan shows that, for all our anxieties about the Age of Search, we are all index-rakers at heart, and we have been for eight hundred years. *A Financial Times and History Today Book of the Year*

Silloi

tus, and Aratus, older than Callimachus, though there is no way of calculating the degrees of difference and these may not have mattered very much. There is no indication that Timon and Callimachus ever met,10 but as will soon become ...

Silloi

Early Skepticism and its founder, Pyrrho of Elis, were introduced to the world by the poet and philosopher Timon of Phlius. This is the first book-length study of Timon s work in English, and includes a new reconstruction of his most influential poem Silloi . All of the extant fragments are translated and discussed as literature rather than as source material for the history of philosophy. The book concludes with a definition of skeptical aesthetics that demonstrates the importance of Timon and early Skepticism to the most influential Hellenistic poets: Callimachus, Theocritus and Apollonius of Rhodes. "

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

Callimachus is quoted by Strabo as saying that his homeland is famous for its horses (Callimachus fr. 716=Strabo 17. 3. 21). Herodotus and Strabo write that the Libyans, and in particular the Asbystae, who were neighbours of Cyrene, ...

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire

This provocative and often controversial volume examines concepts of ethnicity, citizenship and nationhood, to determine what constituted cultural identity in the Roman Empire. The contributors draw together the most recent research and use diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives from archaeology, classical studies and ancient history to challenge our basic assumptions of Romanization and how parts of Europe became incorporated into a Roman culture. Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire breaks new ground, arguing that the idea of a unified and easily defined Roman culture is over-simplistic, and offering alternative theories and models. This well-documented and timely book presents cultural identity throughout the Roman empire as a complex and diverse issue, far removed from the previous notion of a dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the Barbarian conquered.

Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology Abaeus Dysponteus

Callimachus was one of the most fertile ligence of the great danger of the king . ( Liv . xl . writers of antiquity , and if the number in Suidas 56. ) ( W. A. G. ) be correct , he wrote 800 works , though we may CALLI'MACHUS ...

Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology  Abaeus Dysponteus


Brill s Companion to Greek and Latin Epyllion and Its Reception

AD), the commentator gives the names of those whom Callimachus calls Telchines, adding 'roTg [IE]]ICPO]I(€V)O[I.]§ ou'rrofi to m'rio[xvov 16w nowfludiflcov) K(O(i) 6n ooxi ufjxog . . . (“who find fault with the extreme thinness of his ...

Brill   s Companion to Greek and Latin Epyllion and Its Reception

This book offers a critical re-examination of some important (and some lesser known) texts which are commonly labelled 'epyllia' in classical scholarship. It traces the history of the generic term 'epyllion' and sketches the literary and scholarly reception of these texts.

Abaeus Dysponteus

Callimachus was one of the most fertile ligence of the great danger of the king . ( Liv . xl . writers of antiquity , and if the number in Suidas 56. ) ( W. A. G. ) be correct , he wrote 800 works , though we may CALLI'MACHUS ...

Abaeus Dysponteus


ZPE

Callimachus in an epigram had called Antimachus ' poem Lyde " a fat writing ( ypapua ) and not incisive " ( F 398 ) . Then there is the comment " Callimachus the grammarian said a big book is like a big evil " ( F 465 ) , which despite ...

ZPE


Marathon

Callimachus raised his arms, and even the loudest hoplites fell silent. 'Don't be children,' he said, in his powerful voice. They didn't make him polemarch for nothing. Grown men – spearfighters – flinched at the admonition in his voice ...

Marathon

Two and a half thousand years ago, the Greeks and the Persians fought an epic battle to decide the future of the world... Arimnestos of Plataea grew up wanting to be a bronzesmith, like his father. Then, in the chaos of war, he was taken to a city in the Persian empire and sold as a slave. To win his freedom he had to show that he could fight and kill. Now, to preserve that freedom, he must kill again. For the Persians are coming. A vast army sent by King Darius to put down the rebellious Greeks and burn the city of Athens to the ground. Standing against them on the plain of Marathon is a much smaller force of Athenians, alongside their Plataean allies. To defeat such overwhelming force seems impossible. And yet to yield would mean the destruction of everything the Greeks have dreamed of. In the dust and heat of Marathon, in the clash of shields and the rush of spears, amid the thunder of hooves and the screams of the dying, those dreams will undergo their fiercest test - and Arimnestos and his Greek comrades will discover the true price of freedom.

The Lesbian Lyre

Apollonius and his teacher Callimachus were in fact literary rivals: Apollonius the author of a Homeric-styled epic; Callimachus the author of smaller poetic forms, known especially for the adage mega biblion mega kakon 'a big book is a ...

The Lesbian Lyre

Hailed by Plato as the “Tenth Muse” of ancient Greek poetry, Sappho is inarguably antiquity’s greatest lyric poet. Born over 2,600 years ago on the Greek island of Lesbos, and writing amorously of women and men alike, she is the namesake lesbian. What’s left of her writing, and what we know of her, is fragmentary. Shrouded in mystery, she is nonetheless repeatedly translated and discussed – no, appropriated – by all. Sappho has most recently undergone a variety of treatments by agenda-driven scholars and so-called poet-translators with little or no knowledge of Greek. Classicist-translator Jeffrey Duban debunks the postmodernist scholarship by which Sappho is interpreted today and offers translations reflecting the charm and elegant simplicity of the originals. Duban provides a reader-friendly overview of Sappho’s times and themes, exploring her eroticism and Greek homosexuality overall. He introduces us to Sappho’s highly cultured island home, to its lyre-accompanied musical legends, and to the fabled beauty of Lesbian women. Not least, he emphasizes the proximity of Lesbos to Troy, making the translation and enjoyment of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey a further focus. More than anything else, argues Duban, it is free verse and its rampant legacy – and no two persons more than Walt Whitman and Ezra Pound – that bear responsibility for the ruin of today’s classics in translation, to say nothing of poetry in the twentieth century. Beyond matters of reflection for classicists, Duban provides a far-ranging beginner’s guide to classical literature, with forays into Spenser and Milton, and into the colonial impulse of Virgil, Spenser, and the West at large.

Virgil on the Nature of Things

He argues that this tradition goes back - via Ennius' Annales - to Callimachus' Victoria Berenices, which stood as a kind of dedication at the central point of the Aetia (the beginning of book 3, as in the Geogics).

Virgil on the Nature of Things

The Georgics has for many years been a source of fierce controversy among scholars of Latin literature. Is the work optimistic or pessimistic, pro- or anti-Augustan? Should we read it as a eulogy or a bitter critique of Rome and her imperial ambitions? This book suggests that the ambiguity of the poem is the product of a complex and thorough-going engagement with earlier writers in the didactic tradition: Hesiod, Aratus and - above all - Lucretius. Drawing on both traditional, philological approaches to allusion, and modern theories of intertextuality, it shows how the world-views of the earlier poets are subjected to scrutiny and brought into conflict with each other. Detailed consideration of verbal parallels and of Lucretian themes, imagery and structural patterns in the Georgics forms the basis for a reading of Virgil's poem as an extended meditation on the relations between the individual and society, the gods and the natural environment.

A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology

Callimachus was conspicuously figured in the fresco painting of the battle of Marathon , by Polygnotus ... 71 ; and when Lucullus had succeeded in taking a portion of the wall , Callimachus set fire to the place and made his escape by ...

A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology


International Guide to Classical Studies

341 Callimachus , Doricisms * 625 Callimachus , refinement of hexameter 289 Callimachus , influence on Nemesianus * 562 Callimachus , influence on Nicetas of Amnia * 565 Callimachus , style 863 Callimachus : Aetia , fr . in Pap .

International Guide to Classical Studies


Catalogue of Printed Books in the Library of the British Museum

The Hymns of Callimachus translated CALLIMACHUS . APPENDIX . ] See BODONI ( G. B. ) Begin . from the Greek into English verse , with notes . To Chiarissimo Signore ... il ... Sig . Bodoni produrrà al which are added select epigrams ...

Catalogue of Printed Books in the Library of the British Museum


Classical Literature

The prologue (not original to the Aetia, but added when the book was expanded to include books 3 and 4) makes explicit reference to certain unnamed critics of Callimachus who have been muttering about his poetry precisely because 'it is ...

Classical Literature

Classical Literature: An Introduction provides an overview of the essential aspects of Greek and Latin literature. In conjunction with contextualising introductions the material is presented chronologically, by genre and where appropriate by author. The book ranges from Homer to the Roman Empire and includes a chronology of ancient literature, maps, lists of Greek and Roman authors and suggestions for further reading. The collection will be essential for students and others who want a structured and informative introduction to the literature of the classical world.