Calum's Road

Calum's Road

. . . wonderful, elegant and serious,' - The Telegraph 'MacLeod defied powers outwith his control in the only way he could . . . paints a compelling picture of the man' - Sunday Times ' An incredible testament to one man's determination' - The Sunday Herald 'It's inspiring to read about a man who wouldn't succumb, wouldn't let the Government threaten his way of life' - Publishing News 'An extraordinary tale' - The Bookseller 'This is an extraordinarily fine book, and one of the most important books to have come out of the Highlands and Islands in recent years' - West Highland Free Press Calum MacLeod had lived on the northern point of Raasay since his birth in 1911. He tended the Rona lighthouse at the very tip of his little archipelago, until semi-automation in 1967 reduced his responsibilities. 'So what he decided to do,' says his last neighbour, Donald MacLeod, 'was to build a road out of Arnish in his months off. With a road he hoped new generations of people would return to Arnish and all the north end of Raasay . . .' And so, at the age of 56, Calum MacLeod, the last man left in northern Raasay, set about single-handedly constructing the 'impossible' road. It would become a romantic, quixotic venture, a kind of sculpture; an obsessive work of art so perfect in every gradient, culvert and supporting wall that its creation occupied almost twenty years of his life. In Calum's Road, Roger Hutchinson recounts the extraordinary story of this remarkable man's devotion to his visionary project.

Scottish Island Bagging

The Walkhighlands Guide to the Islands of Scotland

Scottish Island Bagging

Scottish Island Bagging by Helen and Paul Webster, founders of Walkhighlands, is a guide to the magical islands of Scotland. Focusing on the ninety-nine islands that have regular trips or means of access for visitors, plus fifty-five other islands which have no regular transport but are still of significant size or interest, the authors have described the best ways to experience each one. Of the islands featured, many are household names – Skye, Lewis, Bute – while some, such as the isolated St Kilda archipelago and the remote Sula Sgeir, will be unknown to all but a hardcore few. When it comes to things to see and do, the islands of Scotland have it all. Wildlife enthusiasts can watch out for otters, orcas and basking sharks, while birdwatchers in particular are spoilt: look out for the rare corncrake on Islay, sea eagles on Mull, or sight puffins, gannets, storm petrels and many other seabirds on any number of islands – although beware the divebombing bonxies. Foodies can sample Arran or Westray cheese, the many islands’ world-renowned seafood or learn about the whisky making process and sample a wee dram on a distillery tour. While the human history may not stretch back in time as far as the geology of these ancient lands, it is rich and varied: visit the 5,000-year-old Neolithic village of Skara Brae on Orkney, or Mackinnon’s Cave on Mull, following in the footsteps of Samuel Johnson and James Boswell. You can even stay in the house on Jura where George Orwell wrote Nineteen Eighty-Four. Hillwalkers can bag a Munro, walk the wild clifftops or take in the sights, or you could just escape from it all on one of the dozens of beautiful and deserted beaches – before joining the locals for a ceilidh into the wee hours. Well served by ferries and other transport links, getting around is easy. You could even take the world’s shortest scheduled flight. In Scottish Island Bagging, let Helen and Paul Webster be your guides to these enchanting isles.

Scottish Sea Kayaking

Fifty Great Sea Kayak Voyages

Scottish Sea Kayaking

A selection of fifty great sea voyages around the mainland of Scotland and the Western Isles.At last, here it is . Scotland's first guidebook for sea kayakers wishing to explore its amazing coastline and magical islands. It brings together a selection of fifty great sea voyages around the mainland of Scotland, from the Mull of Galloway in the SW to St Abb's Head on the east coast, as well as voyages in the Western Isles, ranging from day trips to three day journeys. Illustrated with superb colour photographs and useful maps throughout, it is a practical guide to help you select and plan trips. It will provide inspiration for future voyages and a souvenir of journeys undertaken. As well as providing essential information on where to start and finish, distances, times and tidal information, the book does much to stimulate and inform our interest in the environment we are passing through. It is full of facts and anecdotes about local history, geology, scenery, seabirds and sea mammals. A fascinating read and an inspirational book.

Cycling in the Hebrides

Island Touring and Day Rides Including The Hebridean Way

Cycling in the Hebrides

This guidebook describes 37 day rides for all abilities, and 22 linking routes for more experienced cycle tourists, allow riders to visit all the essential sights in over 20 islands of the Hebrides and of the Firth of Clyde. Routes range from those suitable for short weekend breaks to a challenging 600-mile tour. Whether you're putting together a fortnight's tour or just enjoying a few day rides from a single base, this guide is packed with useful information to help you make the most of your trip. The Hebridean islands offer a wealth of wonderful scenery: the majestic Cuillin mountains on Skye; the otherworldly palm trees on Bute; the marvellous white shell sands on Tiree and Harris. This guidebook features detailed custom mapping and elevation profiles for all routes, and comprehensive information of ferry and transport routes, accommodation, food and drink, supplies, cycle spares and repairs. Island hopping in these islands is a magical experience. The guide visits over 20 of them and each has its own interesting history and wildlife. Reasonably fit cyclists can enjoy these routes at their own pace; experienced cycle tourists will eat up the miles.

Raasay

The Island and Its People

Raasay

Raasay forms part of the parish of Portree, Skye. This work is a history of Raasay and traces the island's story from the medieval period into the 20th century, showing that, far from being a carbon copy of Skye, Raasay has a history of its own, forged by its own unique attributes. Although there are traces of human habitation dating from the last Ice Age, it is not until the 16th century that written records are found. This examination of these documents challenges many long-held assumptions about the island's history, not least that the MacGilleCalum, or MacLeods of Raasay, were believed to have received Raasay from the MacLeods of Lewis, from whom they were directly descended.

The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter

The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter

Winner of the ITV3 Crime Thriller Book Club Best Read Award. Shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey Dagger for Best Debut Crime Novel of the Year and the Saltire Scottish First Book of the Year Award. Longlisted for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for Best Thriller of the Year and the Theakston's Crime Novel of the Year Award. A twenty-nine-year-old man lives alone in his Glasgow flat. The telephone rings; a casual conversation, but behind this a job offer. The clues are there if you know to look for them. He is an expert. A loner. Freelance. Another job is another job, but what if this organization wants more? A meeting at a club. An offer. A brief. A target: Lewis Winter. It's hard to kill a man well. People who do it well know this. People who do it badly find out the hard way. The hard way has consequences. An arresting, gripping novel of dark relationships and even darker moralities, The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter introduces a remarkable voice in crime fiction. Malcolm Mackay's award-winning The Glasgow Trilogy continues in How A Gunman Says Goodbye and The Sudden Arrival of Violence.

Martyrs

Glendale and the Revolution in Skye

Martyrs

In the 1830s and 1840s the district of Glendale on the island of Skye was swamped by immigrants cleared from other north Skye estates. The resultant overcrowding and over-use of land caused simmering discontent - not against the incomers, but against the landowners, who regarded their tenants as no more than chattels. This book is a definitive account of what happened when the powder-keg erupted and a full-scale land-war ensued. Pitched battles with police, factors and bailiffs, military intervention, arrests, trials, imprisonment and the personal intervention of the Prime Minister were to have huge consequences for crofters all over the Highlands, who, ultimately, were the victors. At the heart of the rising was a man named John MacPherson of Lower Milovaig in Glendale, a courageous, charismatic and articulate crofter who was twice imprisoned for leading a rebellion against a system which kept all but the wealthiest in a state of bitter servitude. MacPherson quickly became known as ‘the Glendale Martyr’. Martyrs tells the story of John MacPherson, his comrades, his allies, his enemies and his final success.

St Kilda

A People's History

St Kilda

St Kilda is the most romantic and most romanticised group of islands in Europe. Soaring out of the North Atlantic Ocean like Atlantis come back to life, the islands have captured the imagination of the outside world for hundreds of years. Their inhabitants, Scottish Gaels who lived off the land, the sea and by birdcatching on high and precipitous cliffs, were long considered to be the Noble Savages of the British Isles, living in a state of natural grace. St Kilda: A People's History explores and portrays the life of the St Kildans from the Stone Age to 1930, when the remaining 36 islanders were evacuated to the Scottish mainland. Bestselling author Roger Hutchinson digs deep into the archives to paint a vivid picture of the life and death, work and play of a small, proud and self-sufficient people in the first modern book to chart the history of the most remote islands in Britain.