Cambodia Under the Tricolour

Illustrating the social and political history of Cambodia during the heyday of the French mission civilisatrice in the Sisowath years, this book examines the contradictory nature of the ancient kingdom.

Cambodia Under the Tricolour

Illustrating the social and political history of Cambodia during the heyday of the French mission civilisatrice in the Sisowath years, this book examines the contradictory nature of the ancient kingdom.

Constructing Genocide and Mass Violence

31 Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour, pp. 221–230, 232. 32 RSC 304, M. Humbert-Hesse, “Rapport General sur L'enseignements au Cambodge, Javier 1923,” 10 January 1923 quoted in Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour, p. 220.

Constructing Genocide and Mass Violence

This book addresses two closely related questions: what is the process by which the relatively short and violent genocides of the twentieth century and beyond have occurred? Why have these instances of mass violence been genocidal and not some other form of state violence, repression, or conflict? Hiebert answers these questions by exploring the structures and processes that underpin the decision by political elites to commit genocide, focusing on a sustained comparison of two cases, the Nazi ' Final Solution' and the Cambodian genocide. The book clearly differentiates the structures and processes - contained within a larger overall process - that leads to genocidal violence. Uncovering the mechanisms by which societies (at least in the contemporary era) come to experience genocide as a distinct form of destruction and not some other form of mass or political violence, Hiebert is able to highlight a set of key process that lead to specifically genocidal violence. Providing an insightful contribution to the burgeoning literature in this area, this book will be of interest to students and scholars of genocide, international relations, and political violence.

Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia

Social disorganization and stake in conformity: Complementary factors in the predatory behavior of hoodlums. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 48(1), 12–17. Tully, J. (1996). Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the ...

Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia

Surveys violence in Cambodia from the nineteenth century to the present, testing the theories of Norbert Elias in a non-Western context.

Southeast Asia

Because they faced serious military opposition in Vietnam, the French bought peace in Cambodia in 1946 and 1947 by offering the country's largely ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the "Mission Civilisatrice" 1904-1927.

Southeast Asia

Contains over eight hundred alphabetically arranged entries that provide information about topics related to the historical development and global influence of Southeast Asia, covering politics, war, religion, socioeconomics, ethnohistory, geography, and folklore.

The History of Cambodia

Cambodian Architecture: Eighth to Thirteenth Century. ... London: John Murray, 1864; Travels in Siam, Cambodia and Laos 1858–1860. ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilisatrice,” 1904–1927. Clayton, Vic.

The History of Cambodia

This book includes a narrative history that provides a chronological examination of the political, cultural, philosophical, social, and religious continuities in Cambodia's long rich history. It overviews the history of Cambodia, from the fall of Angkor and the French Protectorate period (1432-1863) to the present. More than half of the book is dedicated to the period from 1970 through the present, with chapters on the Khmer Republic, Democratic Kampuchea, the second civil war, the road to democracy, and Cambodia under Hun Sen. An introductory chapter overviews the country's geography, political institutions, economy, and culture. The book includes black & white historical and contemporary photographs, a chronology, and profiles of key figures.

Cambodia and the West 1500 2000

His latest books are Networks of Trade, Polity, and Societal Integration in Chola Era South India (2013); A History of ... His publications include Cambodia Under the Tricolour (1996), France on the Mekong (2002), A Short History of ...

Cambodia and the West  1500 2000

This volume brings together an interdisciplinary team of established and emerging scholars from the disciplines of history, political science and communication studies, to provide a historical reappraisal of Cambodia’s relationships with the West. Contributors to the volume examine moments of historical import in Cambodia's history, from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. These include Cambodia’s first contacts with European mercantilism; the establishment of formal French colonialism and commercialism; British peace enforcement and diplomacy after the Second World War; independence, modernisation and the onset of the Cold War and the United Nations peace process; and the Khmer Rouge genocide tribunal of more recent times. The result is a unique and significant new analysis of some of Cambodia’s most controversial interactions with the West, demonstrating how far the West has shaped the development of Cambodia in the contemporary epoch.

A History of Cambodia

Insights on trade between Japan and Cambodia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (using Chinese junks) is Yoneo Ishii (ed.) ... 1980), and John Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour: The Sisowath Years (Clayton, Australia 1996).

A History of Cambodia

In this clear and concise volume, author David Chandler provides a timely overview of Cambodia, a small but increasingly visible Southeast Asian nation. Praised by the Journal of Asian Studies as an ''original contribution, superior to any other existing work'', this acclaimed text has now been completely revised and updated to include material examining the early history of Cambodia, whose famous Angkorean ruins now attract more than one million tourists each year, the death of Pol Pot, and the revolution and final collapse of the Khmer Rouge. The fourth edition reflects recent research by major scholars as well as Chandler's long immersion in the subject and contains an entirely new section on the challenges facing Cambodia today, including an analysis of the current state of politics and sociology and the increasing pressures of globalization. This comprehensive overview of Cambodia will illuminate, for undergraduate students as well as general readers, the history and contemporary politics of a country long misunderstood.

Colonial Cambodia s Bad Frenchmen

See also John Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the mission civilisatrice (1904–1927) (Melbourne: Monash Asia Institute, 1997), and France on the Mekong: A history of the French Protectorate in Cambodia (Lanham, ...

Colonial Cambodia s  Bad Frenchmen

Colonial Cambodia's "Bad Frenchmen" provides a captivating analysis of the gradual establishment of French colonialism in the late nineteenth century. Drawing on new materials from French, Vietnamese and Cambodian archives, it reconstructs a time during which France struggled to give meaning and substance to its Protectorate over Cambodia. It traces the lives of failed colonists – most notably Thomas Caramen, who all constituted a challenge to the colonial enterprise by muddling its social, cultural and racial boundaries. In its consideration of the critical role played by these colonists, this compelling book shifts away from governor-generals, grand discourses and the simple view of colonialism as ‘colonizers’ versus ‘colonized’, to explore how things actually worked themselves out on the ground. It examines in particular the 'civilizing mission' and educational initiatives; the slow destruction of the indigenous justice system; the policing of sexual relations between colonisers and colonized; the theft of Cambodian land and taxes by the colonizing power; and the brutal repression of resistance wherever and whenever it appeared. Overall, Muller reveals the crucial role played by indigenous middlemen and marginal Europeans in the rise of the colonial state, and tells the fascinating tale of a Frenchman who came to represent everything that the colonial state dreaded.

Cambodian Buddhism

“The Ancestral Cult in Transition: Reflections on Spatial Organisation in Cambodia's Early Theravàda Complex.” In Klokke and de Bruijn 1998, ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilisatrice” 1904–1927.

Cambodian Buddhism

The study of Cambodian religion has long been hampered by a lack of easily accessible scholarship. This impressive new work by Ian Harris thus fills a major gap and offers English-language scholars a booklength, up-to-date treatment of the religious aspects of Cambodian culture. Beginning with a coherent history of the presence of religion in the country from its inception to the present day, the book goes on to furnish insights into the distinctive nature of Cambodia's important yet overlooked manifestation of Theravada Buddhist tradition and to show how it reestablished itself following almost total annihilation during the Pol Pot period. Historical sections cover the dominant role of tantric Mahayana concepts and rituals under the last great king of Angkor, Jayavarman VII (1181–c. 1220); the rise of Theravada traditions after the collapse of the Angkorian civilization; the impact of foreign influences on the development of the nineteenth-century monastic order; and politicized Buddhism and the Buddhist contribution to an emerging sense of Khmer nationhood. The Buddhism practiced in Cambodia has much in common with parallel traditions in Thailand and Sri Lanka, yet there are also significant differences. The book concentrates on these and illustrates how a distinctly Cambodian Theravada developed by accommodating itself to premodern Khmer modes of thought. Following the overthrow of Prince Sihanouk in 1970, Cambodia slid rapidly into disorder and violence. Later chapters chart the elimination of institutional Buddhism under the Khmer Rouge and its gradual reemergence after Pol Pot, the restoration of the monastic order's prerevolutionary institutional forms, and the emergence of contemporary Buddhist groupings.

Anatomy of a Crisis

Education, Development, and the State in Cambodia, 1953-1998 David M. Ayres. opment, ed. K. Samphan. ... Tully, J. Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the 'Mission Civilisatrice', 1904–1927. Clayton: Monash Papers on ...

Anatomy of a Crisis

In 1993, the United Nations sponsored national elections in Cambodia, signaling the international community's commitment to the rehabilitation and reconstruction of what was, by any measure, a shattered and torn society. Cambodia's economy was stagnant. The education system was in complete disarray: Students had neither pens nor books, teachers were poorly trained, and classrooms were literally crumbling. Few of the individuals and organizations responsible for financing, planning, and implementing Cambodia's post-election development thought it necessary to ask why the country's economy and society were in such a parlous state. The mass graves scattered throughout the countryside provided an obvious explanation. The appalling state of the education system, many argued, could be directly attributed to the fact that among the 1.7 million victims of Pol Pot's holocaust were thousands of students, teachers, technocrats, and intellectuals. In this exacting and insightful examination of the crisis in Cambodian education, David M. Ayres challenges the widespread belief that the key to Cambodia's future development and prosperity lies in overcoming the dreadful legacy of Khmer Rouge. He seeks to explain why Cambodia has struggled with an educational crisis for more that four decades (including the years before the Khmer Rouge came to power in 1975) and thus casts the net of his analysis well beyond Pol Pot and his accomplices. Drawing on an extensive range of sources, Ayres clearly shows that Cambodia's educational dilemma--the disparity between the education system and the economic, political, and cultural environments, which it should serve--can be explained by setting education within its historical and cultural contexts. Themes of tradition, modernity, change, and changelessness are linked with culturally entrenched notions of power, hierarchy, and leadership to clarify why education funding is promised but rarely delivered, why schools are built where they are not needed, why plans are enthusiastically embraced but never implemented, and why contracts and agreements are ignored almost immediately after they are signed. Anatomy of a Crisis will be compulsory reading for anyone with an interest in education and development issues, as well as Cambodian society, culture, politics, and history.

Simas

Alexandra Kent, “Conflict Continues: Transitioning into a Battle for Property in Cambodia Today,” Journal of Southeast ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the 'mission civilisatrice' 1904–1927 (Melbourne: Monash Asia ...

Simas

Human-fashioned boundaries transform spaces by introducing dualisms, bifurcations, creative symbioses, contradictions, and notions of inclusion and exclusion. The Buddhist boundaries considered in this book, sīmās—a term found in South and Southeast Asian languages and later translated into East Asian languages—come in various shapes and sizes and can be established on land or in bodies of water. Sometimes, the word sīmā refers not only to a ceremonial boundary, but the space enclosed by the boundary, or even the markers (when they are used) that denote the boundary. Sīmās were established early on as places where core legal acts (kamma), including ordination, of the monastic community (sangha) took place according to their disciplinary codes. Sīmās continue to be deployed in the creation of monastic lineages and to function in diverse ways for monastics and non-monastics alike. As foundations of Buddhist religion, sīmās are used to sustain, revitalize, or reform Buddhist practices, notions of identity, and conceptualizations of time and history. In the last few decades, scholarly awareness of and expertise on sīmās has developed to a point where a volume like this one, which examines sīmās across numerous cultural contexts and scholarly fields of inquiry, is both possible and needed. Sīmā traditions expressed in the Theravāda cultures of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka constitute the dominant focus of the work; a chapter on East Asia raises questions of historical transmission beyond these areas. Throughout contributors engage texts; history; archaeology; politics; art; ecology; economics; epigraphy; legal categories; mythic narratives; understandings of the cosmos; and conceptualizations of compassion, authority, and violence. Examining sīmās through multiple perspectives allows us to look at them in their contextual specificity, in a way that allows for discernment of variation as well as consistency. Sīmā spaces can be both simple and extremely intricate, and this book helps show why and how that is the case.

At the Edge of the Forest

Essays on Cambodia, History, and Narrative in Honor of David Chandler Anne Ruth Hansen, Judy Ledgerwood ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilisatrice," 1904–1927, Monash Papers on Southeast Asia No.

At the Edge of the Forest

Inspired by David Chandler's groundbreaking work on Cambodian attempts to find order in the aftermath of turmoil, these essays explore Cambodian history using a rich variety of sources that cast light on Khmer perceptions of violence, wildness, and order, examining the "forest" and cultured space, and the fraught "edge" where they meet.

Archiving the Unspeakable

Silence, Memory, and the Photographic Record in Cambodia Michelle Caswell ... Trace, Ciaran B. “What Is Recorded Is Never Simply 'What Happened': Record Keeping in Modern Organizational Culture. ... Cambodia under the Tricolour.

Archiving the Unspeakable

Roughly 1.7 million people died in Cambodia from untreated disease, starvation, and execution during the Khmer Rouge reign of less than four years in the late 1970s. The regime’s brutality has come to be symbolized by the multitude of black-and-white mug shots of prisoners taken at the notorious Tuol Sleng prison, where thousands of “enemies of the state” were tortured before being sent to the Killing Fields. In Archiving the Unspeakable, Michelle Caswell traces the social life of these photographic records through the lens of archival studies and elucidates how, paradoxically, they have become agents of silence and witnessing, human rights and injustice as they are deployed at various moments in time and space. From their creation as Khmer Rouge administrative records to their transformation beginning in 1979 into museum displays, archival collections, and databases, the mug shots are key components in an ongoing drama of unimaginable human suffering. Winner, Waldo Gifford Leland Award, Society of American Archivists Longlist, ICAS Book Prize, International Convention of Asia Scholars

Cambodia s Muslims and the Malay World

26-28; John Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolor. King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilisatrice” 1904-1927 (Clayton: Monash Asia Institute, 1996). 155 Raymond Scupin, “Islam in Thailand before the Bangkok Period”, jss, LXVIII, 1 (1980), p.

Cambodia   s Muslims and the Malay World

In Cambodia’s Muslims and the Malay World Philipp Bruckmayr examines the development of Cambodia’s Muslim minority from the mid-19th to the 21st century. Particular attention is paid to Malay influence, Islamic factionalism and the minority context.

Cambodge

terethnic Relationships in Latin America, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, ed. ... “The Myth of the Saviour, or the Future of Cambodia's Past. ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the Mission Civilisatrice 1904– 1927.

Cambodge

This strikingly original study of Cambodian nationalism brings to life eight turbulent decades of cultural change and sheds new light on the colonial ancestry of Pol Pot’s murderous dystopia. Penny Edwards recreates the intellectual milieux and cultural traffic linking Europe and empire, interweaving analysis of key movements and ideas in the French Protectorate of Cambodge with contemporary developments in the Métropole. From the naturalist Henri Mouhot’s expedition to Angkor in 1860 to the nationalist Son Ngoc Thanh’s short-lived premiership in 1945, this history of ideas tracks the talented Cambodian and French men and women who shaped the contours of the modern Khmer nation. Their visions and ambitions played out within a shifting landscape of Angkorean temples, Parisian museums, Khmer printing presses, world’s fairs, Buddhist monasteries, and Cambodian youth hostels. This is cross-cultural history at its best. With its fresh take on the dynamics of colonialism and nationalism, Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation will become essential reading for scholars of history, politics, and society in Southeast Asia. Edwards’ nuanced analysis of Buddhism and her consideration of Angkor’s emergence as a national monument will be of particular interest to students of Asian and European religion, museology, heritage studies, and art history. As a highly readable guide to Cambodia’s recent past, it will also appeal to specialists in modern French history, cultural studies, and colonialism, as well as readers with a general interest in Cambodia.

Lost Goddesses

The Denial of Female Power in Cambodian History Trudy Jacobsen. and response, p. 181; Justin Corfield, The royal family of Cambodia, Melbourne: Khmer Language & Culture Centre, 1993, p. ... 359; tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour, pp.

Lost Goddesses

In prehistoric times, Southeast Asian women enjoyed high status. When, how and why did that change? This book explores the history of gender relations through economics, politics, art and literature. This title is a narrative and visual tour de force, of interest to scholars and the general public.

How to Behave

Buddhism and Modernity in Colonial Cambodia, 1860–1930 Anne Ruth Hansen ... Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilatrice,” 1904–1927. Clayton, Victoria: Monash Papers on Southeast Asia, no. 37.

How to Behave

This ambitious cross-disciplinary study of Buddhist modernism in colonial Cambodia breaks new ground in understanding the history and development of religion and colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Youth Mobilization in Vichy Indochina and Its Legacies 1940 to 1970

Osborne , Sihanouk , 16-18 ; John Tully , Cambodia under the Tricolour : King Sisowath and the Mission Civilisatrice ' : 1904–1907 ( Clayton , Victoria : Monash University , 1996 ) . 81. Lockhart , The End of the Vietnamese Monarchy ...

Youth Mobilization in Vichy Indochina and Its Legacies  1940 to 1970

Youth Mobilization in Vichy Indochina and Its Legacies analyzes the causes and consequences of state-sponsored patriotic youth associations during World War II in French Indochina. Providing an historical account of the transnational policy process of youth mobilization during World War II, this book explores how officials transplanted French doctrines to Indochina with sensitivity toward the varying local political contexts and cultural traditions the French believed they had found there.

Mixed Medicines

Health and Culture in French Colonial Cambodia Sokhieng Au ... For a general review of French economic activity during this time, see John Tully, Cambodia under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the 'Mission Civilisatrice' 1904–1927 ...

Mixed Medicines

During the first half of the twentieth century, representatives of the French colonial health services actively strove to expand the practice of Western medicine in the frontier colony of Cambodia. But as the French physicians ventured beyond their colonial enclaves, they found themselves negotiating with the plurality of Cambodian cultural practices relating to health and disease. These negotiations were marked by some success, a great deal of misunderstanding, and much failure. Bringing together colorful historical vignettes, social and anthropological theory, and quantitative analyses, Mixed Medicines examines these interactions between the Khmer, Cham, and Vietnamese of Cambodia and the French, documenting the differences in their understandings of medicine and revealing the unexpected transformations that occurred during this period—for both the French and the indigenous population.

Phnom Penh

One of the few writers to study the period in detail is John Tully, Cambodia Under the Tricolour: King Sisowath and the “Mission Civilisatrice”, Melbourne, 1996. Alain Forest's Le Cambodge ends its coverage in 1920, and Paul Collard, ...

Phnom Penh

As a one-time resident of Phnom Penh and an authority on Southeast Asia, Milton Osborne provides a colorful account of the troubled history and appealing culture of Cambodia's capital city. Osborne sheds light on Phnom Penh's early history, when first Iberian missionaries and freebooters and then French colonists held Cambodia's fate in their hands. The book examines one of the most intriguing rulers of the twentieth century, King Norodom Sihanouk, who ruled over a city of palaces, Buddhist temples, and transplanted French architecture, an exotic blend that remains to this day. Osborne also describes the terrible civil war, the Khmer Rouge's capture of the city, the defeat of Pol Pot in 1979, and Phnom Penh's slow reemergence as one of the most attractive cities in Southeast Asia.