Canadian Culinary Imaginations

An exploration of food-focused art, literature, and culture and how they generate and disrupt discourses around Canadian nationhood and politics.

Canadian Culinary Imaginations

An exploration of food-focused art, literature, and culture and how they generate and disrupt discourses around Canadian nationhood and politics.

Re Imagining Depression

Recent publications include a book chapter on queer food studies (Canadian Culinary Imaginations, McGill-Queen's University Press) and an article on neurodiversity in popular culture (Los Angeles Review of Books).

Re Imagining Depression

What is depression? An “imagined sun, bright and black at the same time?” A “noonday demon?” In literature, poetry, comics, visual art, and film, we witness new conceptualizations of depression come into being. Unburdened by diagnostic criteria and pharmaceutical politics, these media employ imagery, narrative, symbolism, and metaphor to forge imaginative, exploratory, and innovative representations of a range of experiences that might get called “depression.” Texts such as Julia Kristeva’s Black Sun: Depression and Melancholia (1989), Andrew Solomon’s The Noonday Demon (2000), Allie Brosh’s cartoons, “Adventures in Depression” (2011) and “Depression Part Two” (2013), and Lars von Trier’s film Melancholia (2011) each offer portraits of depression that deviate from, or altogether reject, the dominant language of depression that has been articulated by and within psychiatry. Most recently, Ann Cvetkovich’s Depression: A Public Feeling (2012) has answered the author’s own call for a multiplication of discourses on depression by positing crafting as one possible method of working through depression-as-“impasse.” Inspired by Cvetkovich’s efforts to re-shape the depressive experience itself and the critical ways in which we communicate this experience to others, Re/Imagining Depression: Creative Approaches to “Feeling Bad” harnesses critical theory, gender studies, critical race theory, affect theory, visual art, performance, film, television, poetry, literature, comics, and other media to generate new paradigms for thinking about the depressive experience. Through a combination of academic essays, prose, poetry, and interviews, this anthology aims to destabilize the idea of the mental health “expert” to instead demonstrate the diversity of affects, embodiments, rituals and behaviors that are often collapsed under the singular rubric of “depression.”

Ethics and Affects in the Fiction of Alice Munro

Her article on food imagery in Munro's fiction and Mary Pratt's paintings is forthcoming in Canadian Culinary Imaginations. She is currently working in student services at Camosun College in Victoria. Amelia DeFalco is University ...

Ethics and Affects in the Fiction of Alice Munro

Ethics and Affects in the Fiction of Alice Munro explores the representation of embodied ethics and affects in Alice Munro’s writing. The collection illustrates how Munro’s short stories powerfully intersect with important theoretical trends in literary studies, including affect studies, ethical criticism, age studies, disability studies, animal studies, and posthumanism. These essays offer us an Alice Munro who is not the kindly Canadian icon reinforcing small-town verities who was celebrated and perpetuated in acts of national pedagogy with her Nobel Prize win; they ponder, instead, an edgier, messier Munro whose fictions of affective and ethical perplexities disturb rather than comfort. In Munro’s fiction, unruly embodiments and affects interfere with normative identity and humanist conventions of the human based on reason and rationality, destabilizing prevailing gender and sexual politics, ethical responsibilities, and affective economies. As these essays make clear, Munro’s fiction reminds us of the consequences of everyday affects and the extraordinary ordinariness of the ethical encounters we engage again and again.

Food in Memory and Imagination

Fishel, S. (2018), “Fermenters of the World Unite!” CuiZine: Journal of Canadian Food Cultures, 9 (2). Freidberg, S. (2004), French Beans and Food Scares: Culture and Commerce in an Anxious Age, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Food in Memory and Imagination

How do we engage with food through memory and imagination? This expansive volume spans time and space to illustrate how, through food, people have engaged with the past, the future, and their alternative presents. Beth M. Forrest and Greg de St. Maurice have brought together first-class contributions, from both established and up-and-coming scholars, to consider how imagination and memory intertwine and sometimes diverge. Chapters draw on cases around the world-including Iran, Italy, Japan, Kenya, and the US-and include topics such as national identity, food insecurity, and the phenomenon of knowledge. Contributions represent a range of disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. This volume is a veritable feast for the contemporary food studies scholar.

The Politics of Spatial Transgressions in the Arts

Barenscott is co-editor of Canadian Culinary Imaginations (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2020), an interdisciplinary ... artists, academics, cooks, performers, and gallery curators are inspired and challenged by the topic of food, ...

The Politics of Spatial Transgressions in the Arts

This book is an anthology of the varied strategies of spatial transgressions and how they have been implemented through the arts as a means to resist, rejuvenate, reclaim, critique or cohabitate. The book is divided into two sections – Displacements and Disruptions. The first section discusses the ramifications of the spatial displacements of bodies, organizations, groups of people and ethnicities, and explores how artists, theorists and arts organizations have an attentive history of revealing and reacting to the displacement of peoples and how their presence or absence radically reconfigures the value, identity, and uses of place. In the second section, each author considers how aesthetic strategies have been utilized to disrupt expected spatial experiences and logic. Many of these strategies form radical alternative methodologies that include transgressions, geographies of resistance, and psychogeographies. These spatial performances of disruption set into motion a critical exchange between the subject, space and materiality, in which ideology and experience are both produced/spatialized and deconstructed/destabilized.

The Culinary Imagination From Myth to Modernity

13 At least as shocking as these projects are the utilitarian items that the Canadian artist JanaSterbak has fashioned over theyears from flanksteak.Her infamous Vanitas: Flesh Dress foran Albino Anorectic wasan earlyversion of themeat ...

The Culinary Imagination  From Myth to Modernity

From the recipe novel to the celebrity chef, renowned scholar Sandra M. Gilbert explores the poetics and politics of food. In this stunning and important work, the prominent critic, poet, and memoirist Sandra M. Gilbert explores our relationship with food and eating through discussions of literature, art, and popular culture. Focusing on contemporary practices, The Culinary Imagination traces the social, aesthetic, and political history of food from myth to modernity, from ancient sources to our current wave of food mania. What does it mean to transform raw stuff into cooked dishes, which then become part of our own bodies; to savor festive meals yet resolve to renounce gluttony; to act as predators where in another life we might have become prey? Do the rituals of the kitchen have different meanings for men and women, for professional chefs and home cooks? Why, today, do so many of us turn so passionately toward table topics, on the page, online, and on screen? What are the philosophical implications of the food chain on which we all find ourselves? In The Culinary Imagination, Gilbert addresses these powerful questions through meditations on myths and memoirs, children’s books, novels, poems, food blogs, paintings, TV shows, and movies. Discussing figures from Rex Stout to Julia Child and Andy Warhol, from M. F. K. Fisher and Sylvia Plath to Alice Waters and Peter Singer, she analyzes the politics and poetics of our daily bread, investigating our complex self-definitions as producers, consumers, and connoisseurs of food. The result is an ambitious, lively, and learned examination of the ways in which our culture’s artists have represented food across a range of genres.

Thinking Queerly

And to Shelley Boyd, for our chats over dinner, and for including my oddball essay on queer food studies in your excellent volume, Canadian Culinary Imaginations. To Bea, for all the reasons. To my parents, for instilling in me a love ...

Thinking Queerly

Why do we love wizards? Where do these magical figures come from? Thinking Queerly traces the wizard from medieval Arthurian literature to contemporary YA adaptations. By exploring the link between Merlin and Harry Potter, or Morgan le Fay and Sabrina, readers will see how the wizard offers spaces of hope and transformation for young readers. In particular, this book examines how wizards think differently, and how this difference can resonate with both LGBTQ and neurodivergent readers, who’ve been told they don’t fit in.

Edible Histories Cultural Politics

Towards a Canadian Food History Franca Iacovetta, Valerie J. Korinek, Marlene Epp ... 59 An excellent discussion ofthese nineteenthcentury booksisJulia RadyShaw, 'The Culinary Imagination: Canadian Cookbooks and the Construction ...

Edible Histories  Cultural Politics

Just as the Canada's rich past resists any singular narrative, there is no such thing as a singular Canadian food tradition. This new book explores Canada's diverse food cultures and the varied relationships that Canadians have had historically with food practices in the context of community, region, nation and beyond. Based on findings from menus, cookbooks, government documents, advertisements, media sources, oral histories, memoirs, and archival collections, Edible Histories offers a veritable feast of original research on Canada's food history and its relationship to culture and politics. This exciting collection explores a wide variety of topics, including urban restaurant culture, ethnic cuisines, and the controversial history of margarine in Canada. It also covers a broad time-span, from early contact between European settlers and First Nations through the end of the twentieth century. Edible Histories intertwines information of Canada's 'foodways' – the practices and traditions associated with food and food preparation – and stories of immigration, politics, gender, economics, science, medicine and religion. Sophisticated, culturally sensitive, and accessible, Edible Histories will appeal to students, historians, and foodies alike.

India and the Diasporic Imagination

Ethnic and Racial Studies. 7 (1984): 387-97. Waugh, Thomas. 'Home is not the Place One has Left: Or Masala as 'a Multicultural Culinary Treat'?', in Canada's Best Features: Critical Essays on 15 Canadian Films, Eugene P. Walz, ed.

India and the Diasporic Imagination

The idea of India and the Indian diasporic imagination is the product of the rich scholarship being done on the Asian sub-continent, as well as in the many countries where South Asians have settled. The notion of ‘many Indias’ and many diasporas attempts to accommodate people with multiple identities, encompassing a complex amalgam that includes the bewildering diversity of the sub-continent and the challenging hybridity of the places where they have settled. The shaping and reshaping of identities are fundamental to the universal quest to belong and to create new homelands while not eliminating notions of the imagined ancestral homelands. The reality is, as this volume demonstrates, that old conceptions of India, even ‘many Indias’, are now inadequate to accommodate the fluid identities that characterize the Asian sub-continental diasporas.

Making the Best of It

Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the Second World War Sarah Glassford, Amy Shaw. Drinkwater, Catherine Knight. Letters to Edgewood Farm from a Canadian Girl in World War II. ... “Culinary Imagination as a Survival Tool.

Making the Best of It

Many women who lived through the Second World War believed it heralded new status and opportunities. But did it? Making the Best of It examines how gender and other identities intersected to shape the experiences of female Canadians and Newfoundlanders during the war. The contributors to this thoughtful collection consider mainstream and minority populations, girls and women, and different parts of Canada and Newfoundland in their essays. Ultimately, they lay a foundation for a better understanding of the ways in which the lives of Canadian women and girls were altered during and after the 1940s.

Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Student Experience in Canadian Higher Education

While not a rejection of the Canadian food experience, attending Chinese festivals or markets and eating Chinese or ... However, during her early years in Canada, she “recognized that [her] imaginations were still imaginations” (p. 17).

Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Student Experience in Canadian Higher Education

Canada has become one of the most popular destinations for international students at the higher education level. A number of complex factors and trends, both in Canada and globally, have contributed to the emergence of Canada as a destination for international higher education. However, more research is still needed to better understand the experiences of international students in Canada considering the rapid growth in numbers as well as the social, political, and linguistic singularity of Canada as a destination. Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Student Experience in Canadian Higher Education is an essential scholarly publication that explores international students' experiences in Canadian colleges and universities. It seeks to explore the various factors, aspects, challenges, and successes that characterize the international student experience in Canadian higher education from the perspective of international students and the academic communities to which they belong. Featuring a wide range of topics such as information literacy, professional development, and experiential learning, this book is ideal for academicians, instructors, researchers, policymakers, curriculum designers, and students.

Gold Diggers

236 (Parks Canada, 1978). Chapter 17 Mary Lee Davis ... The culinary imagination of the Fairview chefs is described in an unpublished history of the Yukon Order of Pioneers, shown to me by its author, John Gould, a Dawson historian.

Gold Diggers

Between 1896 and 1899, thousands of people lured by gold braved a grueling journey into the remote wilderness of North America. Within two years, Dawson City, in the Canadian Yukon, grew from a mining camp of four hundred to a raucous town of over thirty thousand people. The stampede to the Klondike was the last great gold rush in history. Scurvy, dysentery, frostbite, and starvation stalked all who dared to be in Dawson. And yet the possibilities attracted people from all walks of life—not only prospectors but also newspapermen, bankers, prostitutes, priests, and lawmen. Gold Diggers follows six stampeders—Bill Haskell, a farm boy who hungered for striking gold; Father Judge, a Jesuit priest who aimed to save souls and lives; Belinda Mulrooney, a twenty–four–year–old who became the richest businesswoman in town; Flora Shaw, a journalist who transformed the town's governance; Sam Steele, the officer who finally established order in the lawless town; and most famously Jack London, who left without gold, but with the stories that would make him a legend. Drawing on letters, memoirs, newspaper articles, and stories, Charlotte Gray delivers an enthralling tale of the gold madness that swept through a continent and changed a landscape and its people forever.

How Canadians Communicate VI

food fears (see also food scares): of additives, 299, 302–4, 307; in early history, 297–98; germophobia, 303–4; ... 47–48; and imagination, 27–28; importance of place in, 23–24, 26; and nutrition information, 60; and values, 21–22 food ...

How Canadians Communicate VI

Food nourishes the body, but our relationship with food extends far beyond our need for survival. Food choices not only express our personal tastes but also communicate a range of beliefs, values, affiliations and aspirations—sometimes to the exclusion of others. In the media sphere, the enormous amount of food-related advice provided by government agencies, advocacy groups, diet books, and so on compete with efforts on the part of the food industry to sell their product and to respond to a consumer-driven desire for convenience. As a result, the topic of food has grown fraught, engendering sometimes acrimonious debates about what we should eat, and why. By examining topics such as the values embedded in food marketing, the locavore movement, food tourism, dinner parties, food bank donations, the moral panic surrounding obesity, food crises, and fears about food safety, the contributors to this volume paint a rich, and sometimes unsettling portrait of how food is represented, regulated, and consumed in Canada. With chapters from leading scholars such as Ken Albala, Harvey Levenstein, Stephen Kline and Valerie Tarasuk, the volume also includes contributions from “food insiders”—bestselling cookbook author and food editor Elizabeth Baird and veteran restaurant reviewer John Gilchrist. The result is a timely and thought-provoking look at food as a system of communication through which Canadians articulate cultural identity, personal values, and social distinction. Contributors include Ken Albala, Elizabeth Baird, Jacqueline Botterill, Rebecca Carruthers Den Hoed, Catherine Carstairs, Nathalie Cooke, Pierre Desrochers, Josh Greenberg, Stephen Kline, Jordan Lebel, Harvey Levenstein, Wayne McCready, Irina Mihalache, Eric Pateman, Rod Phillips, Sheilagh Quaile, Melanie Rock, Paige Schell, and Valerie Tarasuk.

Imagining Difference

Legend, Curse, and Spectacle in a Canadian Mining Town Leslie Robertson ... marriage ceremonies in Egypt , national culinary talents of Chinese male “ peasants , " a seventeenth - century Lithuanian women's petition , the Egyptian ...

Imagining Difference

Imagining Difference is an ethnography about historical and contemporary ideas of human difference expressed by residents of Fernie, BC -- a coal-mining town transforming into an international ski resort. Focusing on diverse experiences of people from the European diaspora, Robertson analyzes expressions of difference from the multiple locations of age, ethnicity, gender, class, and religion. Her starting point is a popular local legend about an indigenous curse cast on the valley and its residents in the nineteenth century. Successive interpretations of the story reveal a complicated landscape of memory and silence, mapping out official and contested histories, social and scientific theories as well as the edicts of political discourse. Cursing becomes a metaphor for discursive power resonating in political, popular, and cultural contexts, transmitting ideas of difference across generations and geographies. Stories are powerful imaginative resources in the contexts of colonialism, war, immigration, labour strife, natural disaster, treaty-making, and globalization.This study suggests that while criteria may shift, ideas of "race" and "foreignness," expressions of regionalism, and class and religious identity remain fixed in the social imagination. The author draws from folklore, media imagery, historical records, and interviews; field notes and verbatim accounts provide readers with a sense of the ethnographic process. While situated historically and socially in Fernie, BC, this work will appeal to those in anthropology, women’s studies, Native studies, and history, as well as to regional readers and anyone interested in life in resource towns in North America.

Meanings of Maple

... not make much geographic meaning on the island is that maple is not a very important part of the culinary imagination there. According to Canadian folklorist Diane Tye, the sweetener of historic choice in Newfoundland is molasses, ...

Meanings of Maple

"In Meanings of Maple, Michael A. Lange provides a cultural analysis of maple syrup making and its relationship to Vermont identity."--Back cover.

Food and Media

For an impoverished gentlewoman trying to settle in Canada in the 1830s it would appear to be so: Necessity has truly been ... While the culinary quality of the squirrel dishes is left to the gentle readers'imagination, the creative ...

Food and Media

Food is everywhere in contemporary mediascapes, as witnessed by the increase in cookbooks, food magazines, television cookery shows, online blogs, recipes, news items and social media posts about food. This mediatization of food means that the media often interplays between food consumption and everyday practices, between private and political matters and between individuals, groups, and societies. This volume argues that contemporary food studies need to pay more attention to the significance of media in relation to how we 'do' food. Understanding food media is particularly central to the diverse contemporary social and cultural practices of food where media use plays an increasingly important but also differentiated and differentiating role in both large-scale decisions and most people's everyday practices. The contributions in this book offer critical studies of food media discourses and of media users' interpretations, negotiations and uses that construct places and spaces as well as possible identities and everyday practices of sameness or otherness that might form new, or renew old food politics.

Urban Food Culture

Culinary Imagination as a Survival Tool Ethel Mulvany and the Changi Jail Prisoners of War Cookbook, Singapore, 1942–1945. Canadian Military History 22 (1): 39–49. Farrer, James. 2010a. Introduction: Food Studies and Global Studies in ...

Urban Food Culture

This book explores the food history of twentieth-century Sydney, Shanghai and Singapore within an Asian Pacific network of flux and flows. It engages with a range of historical perspectives on each city’s food and culinary histories, including colonial culinary legacies, restaurants, cafes, street food, market gardens, supermarkets and cookbooks, examining the exchange of goods and services and how the migration of people to the urban centres informed the social histories of the cities’ foodways in the contexts of culinary nationalism, ethnic identities and globalization. Considering the recent food history of the three cities and its complex narrative of empire, trade networks and migration patterns, this book discusses key aspects of each city’s cuisine in the twentieth century, examining the interwoven threads of colonialism and globalization. ​

Culinary Herbs

Abstract This book is a comprehensive reference guide to herb and spice plants that are cultivated in Canada and the northern ... Culinary herbs have attracted the best imaginations in the history of civilization , and both folklore and ...

Culinary Herbs

"A publication of the National Research Council of Canada Monograph Publishing Program."

Muslims in the Western Imagination

“Two AngloNorman Culinary Collections from British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii.” Speculum 61, no. 4 (October 1986): 859–882. ... Canadian Review of American Studies 30, no. 1 (2000): 1– 21. Howard, Deborah.

Muslims in the Western Imagination

A Choice 2015 Outstanding Academic Title Throughout history, Muslim men have been depicted as monsters. The portrayal of humans as monsters helps a society delineate who belongs and who, or what, is excluded. Even when symbolic, as in post-9/11 zombie films, Muslim monsters still function to define Muslims as non-human entities. These are not depictions of Muslim men as malevolent human characters, but rather as creatures that occupy the imagination -- non-humans that exhibit their wickedness outwardly on the skin. They populate medieval tales, Renaissance paintings, Shakespearean dramas, Gothic horror novels, and Hollywood films. Through an exhaustive survey of medieval, early modern, and contemporary literature, art, and cinema, Muslims in the Western Imagination examines the dehumanizing ways in which Muslim men have been constructed and represented as monsters, and the impact such representations have on perceptions of Muslims today. The study is the first to present a genealogy of these creatures, from the demons and giants of the Middle Ages to the hunchbacks with filed teeth that are featured in the 2007 film 300, arguing that constructions of Muslim monsters constitute a recurring theme, first formulated in medieval Christian thought. Sophia Rose Arjana shows how Muslim monsters are often related to Jewish monsters, and more broadly to Christian anti-Semitism and anxieties surrounding African and other foreign bodies, which involves both religious bigotry and fears surrounding bodily difference. Arjana argues persuasively that these dehumanizing constructions are deeply embedded in Western consciousness, existing today as internalized beliefs and practices that contribute to the culture of violence--both rhetorical and physical--against Muslims.

Culinary Fictions

Resistance, insofar as the evocation of a culinary register can deliberately and strategically disrupt the notion that ... the United States and Canada, at the same time that it takes into account how the workings of the imagination, ...

Culinary Fictions

An exploration of how and why food matters in the culture and literature of the South Asian diaspora.