National Union Catalog

A Cumulative Author List Representing Library of Congress Printed Cards and Titles Reported by Other American Libraries

National Union Catalog

Includes entries for maps and atlases.

Eighteenth-Century Escape Tales

Between Fact and Fiction

Eighteenth-Century Escape Tales

This volume is a study of the interdisciplinary nature of prison escape tales and their impact on European cultural identity in the eighteenth-century. Contemporary readers identified with the heroism such works promoted, because escape heroes most often define themselves via their confrontation with the arbitrary power of the sovereign, prefiguring the boldnessof the French Revolution.

Leonardo Sciascia's French Authors

Leonardo Sciascia's French Authors

Sciascia frequently alludes to French authors, and is often taken to have a close relationship with French literature in general. However, academic critics have never given this important relationship comprehensive and detailed examination. This book focuses on the most relevant French writers. For the majority, attention falls on two complementary areas: the opinions that Sciascia expresses about the writer in his essays; and intertextual allusions to the writer in Sciascia's fiction. These allusions often shift the meaning of the host text or markedly increase its impact. This book works on the assumption that, in order to analyse these effects fully, a careful reading of the relevant French texts is needed. This exploration leads to a reappraisal of Sciascia's relations both with particular French authors and also with French literature generally.

Contemporary Authors

A Bibliographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Non-Fiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Televi

Contemporary Authors

Entries contain personal and career information on contemporary authors as well as their published writings and work in progress

Disabled Powers

A Reading of Voltaire's Contes

Disabled Powers

This is a reading of the Romans et Contes of Voltaire in the light of Bakhtin's concept of the Carnivalesque. Part I of this study establishes a paradigm for the twenty-six Contes. It focuses on generic patterns and a thematics of disablement. Part II offers carnivalesque readings of two tales, Le Monde comme il va and Candide. The last Part considers successively six of the later Contes, including L'Ingénu and Jenni, and the historical changes in consciousness that they reflect. The shift towards bourgeois realism is evident in the rise of sentiment and the patriarchal family on the one hand, materialism on the other. These tales exhibit an increasingly deep ambivalence towards corporality. In conclusion the study traces the changing forms of the carnivalesque figure, from geometrical to vitalist, within the Contes as a whole.

Narrative as Theme

Studies in French Fiction

Narrative as Theme

In literature the very act of narration often constitutes a theme: everyone is familiar with narration that interrupts the story, that provides an ironic gloss on the action, that exposes the narrator, that serves to deceive. In Narrative as Theme Gerald Prince offers the first book-length study of the theme of narrative and of the relationshipøbetween narrative and truth in fiction. In the first part, theoretical in nature, Prince considers the notion of theme as well as the theme of narrative itself, surveys the research that has come out of that notion, and isolates starting points for the investigation of narrative as theme. Of particular interest to narratologists will be his discussion of the "disnarrated," all those passages of a text that consider what did not or does not happen but oculd have. He shows how the disnarrated is an important guide to reading the theme of narrative. The second part focuses on seven French novels: Mme de Lafayette's La Princesse de Cl_ves, Voltaire's Candide, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Sartre's La Nausäe, Maupassant's Bel-Ami, Claude Simon's La Route des Flandres, and Patrick Modiano's Rue des Boutiques Obscures. Written in first and third person, absorbed or not in the act of narration, variously concerned with history, ethics, and psychology, these classical, modern, and postmodern works exemplify basic positions with regard to the truth or value of narrative. His Dictionary of Narratology, published by the University of Nebraska Press in 1987, confirmed Gerald Prince as one of the world's leading narratologists.