Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court

Consequently, the process by which the justices select cases must be recognized as one of the most important aspects of the Court's work.

Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court

For decades the Supreme Court has received more requests for review than it can possibly grant; it now rejects more than ninety percent of the petitions which fulfill jurisdictional requirements. Consequently, the process by which the justices select cases must be recognized as one of the most important aspects of the Court's work. But because it is hidden from public view and proceeds by secret ballot, the case-selection process has never been thoroughly analyzed. This concise and accessible study provides an intimate view of the Court's case-selection process through an analysis of the docket books and other papers of Justice Harold H. Burton, who kept scrupulous records of the Court's work from 1945 to 1957. In her analysis of these invaluable records—the only records of case-selection votes made public since the advent of discretionary review in 1925—Provine provides two perspectives on the problematic issue of judicial motivation in case selection. The first perspective is an institutional one in which the Court is treated as the unit of analysis: the second is personal, in which differences among decision makers are the focus of analysis. Provine suggests that judicial role perceptions go far to explain both agreement and disagreement in case selection. She also considers the impact of the process upon litigants, since the system seems to favor petitioners with litigation expertise, especially the U.S. government. Yet, she claims, the secrecy of case selection fosters the popular misperception that any worthwhile case can be appealed "all the way to the Supreme Court." The Court thus maintains its image as a forum equally available to all litigants.

Precedent in the United States Supreme Court

This volume presents a variety of both normative and descriptive perspectives on the use of precedent by the United States Supreme Court.

Precedent in the United States Supreme Court

This volume presents a variety of both normative and descriptive perspectives on the use of precedent by the United States Supreme Court. It brings together a diverse group of American legal scholars, some of whom have been influenced by the Segal/Spaeth "attitudinal" model and some of whom have not. The group of contributors includes legal theorists and empiricists, constitutional lawyers and legal generalists, leading authorities and up-and-coming scholars. The book addresses questions such as how the Court establishes durable precedent, how the Court decides to overrule precedent, the effects of precedent on case selection, the scope of constitutional precedent, the influence of concurrences and dissents, and the normative foundations of constitutional precedent. Most of these questions have been addressed by the Court itself only obliquely, if at all. The volume will be valuable to readers both in the United States and abroad, particularly in light of ongoing debates over the role of precedent in civil-law nations and emerging legal systems.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases

DS ect index 11EW PRED GUINQ do D STATES SUR COURT CN Suliai ... United Automobile , Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America , International Union — 46 decision in the appropriate intermediate federal appeals court and ...

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases


Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court

The Court has attempted to communicate these shared criteria for case selection through one vehicle , Rule 19 of the Supreme Court's Revised Rules . The Court's Published Decision Criterion : Rule 19 Rule 19 is the Court's only ...

Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court


The Judicialization of Politics in Pakistan

In order to compare the relatively unregulated process of case-selection in Pakistan to the more structured processes utilized by the Supreme Courts of the United States’ and India, this book aims to understand the historical roots of ...

The Judicialization of Politics in Pakistan

Since 2007, the Supreme Court of Pakistan has emerged as a dominant force in Pakistani politics through its hyper-active use of judicial review, or the power to overrule Parliament’s laws and the Prime Minister’s acts. This hyper-activism was on display during the Supreme Court’s unilateral disqualification of Prime Minister Yousef Raza Gilani in 2012 under the leadership of Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry. Despite the Supreme Court’s practical adoption of restraint subsequent to the retirement of Chief Justice Chaudhry in 2013, the Court has once again disqualified a prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, due to allegations of corruption in 2017. While many critics have focused on the substance of the Court’s decisions in these cases, sufficient focus is not paid to the amorphous case-selection process of the Supreme Court of Pakistan. In order to compare the relatively unregulated process of case-selection in Pakistan to the more structured processes utilized by the Supreme Courts of the United States’ and India, this book aims to understand the historical roots of judicial review in each country dating back to the colonial era extending through the foundational period of each nation impacting present-day jurisprudence. As a first in its kind, this study comparatively examines these periods of history in order to contextualize a practical prescription to standardize the case-selection process in the Supreme Court of Pakistan in a way that retains the Court’s overall power while limiting its involvement in purely political issues. This publication offers a critical and comparative view of the Supreme Court of Pakistan’s recent involvement in political disputes due to the lack of a discerning case-selection system that has otherwise been adopted by the Supreme Courts of India and the United States’ to varying degrees. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of Asian Law, South Asian Politics and Law and Comparative Law.

SCOTUS 2019

This second volume in Palgrave’s SCOTUS series explains and contextualizes the landmark cases of the US Supreme Court in the term ending 2019.

SCOTUS 2019

Each year, the Supreme Court of the United States announces new rulings with deep consequences for our lives. This second volume in Palgrave’s SCOTUS series explains and contextualizes the landmark cases of the US Supreme Court in the term ending 2019. With a close look at cases involving key issues and debates in American politics and society, SCOTUS 2019 tackles the Court's rulings on the census citizenship question, partisan gerrymandering, religious monuments, the death penalty, race in jury selection, double jeopardy, jury trials for reimprisonment during supervised release, Fourth Amendment protection for blood alcohol tests, deference to federal agencies, excessive fines under the Eighth Amendment and more. Written by notable scholars in political science and law, the chapters in SCOTUS 2019 present the details of each ruling, its meaning for constitutional debate, and its impact on public policy or partisan politics. Finally, SCOTUS 2019 offers an analysis of the controversial Justice Brett Kavanaugh's first term in office, as well as a big-picture look at the implications of the Court's decisions for the direction of this new Roberts Court.

A Selection of Leading Cases Upon Commercial Law Decided by the Supreme Court of the United States

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

A Selection of Leading Cases Upon Commercial Law Decided by the Supreme Court of the United States

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

American Criminal Courts

The United States Supreme Court and criminal cases, 1935À1976: alternative models of agenda building. Br J Pol Sci 1981;11(4):449À70. Watson WL. The U.S. Supreme Courts in forma pauperis docket: a descriptive analysis.

American Criminal Courts

American Criminal Courts: Legal Process and Social Context is an introductory-level text that offers a comprehensive study of the legal processes that guide criminal courts and the social contexts that introduce variations in the activities of actors inside and outside the court. Specifically the text focuses upon: Legal Processes. U.S. criminal courts are constrained by several legal processes and organizational structures that determine how the courts operate and how laws are applied. This book explores how democratic processes develop the criminal law in the United States, the documents that define law (federal and state constitutions, legal codes, administrative policies), the organizational structure of courts at the federal and state levels, the overlapping authority of the appeals process, and the effect of legal processes such as precedent, jurisdiction, and the underlying legal philosophies of various types of courts. Although most texts on criminal courts do a credible job of describing legal processes, this text looks more deeply into the origins of criminal law, historic turning points in the criminal law, conditions that affect the decision-making of criminal justice practitioners, and the contentious political process that affects how criminal laws are considered. Social Contexts. The criminal courts are staffed by people who represent different perspectives, occupational pressures, and organizational goals. The text includes chapters on actors in the traditional courtroom workgroup (judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys), as well as those outside the court who seek to influence it, including advocacy groups, media, and politicians. It is the interplay between the court legal processes and the social actors in the courtroom that makes the application of the criminal laws so fascinating. By focusing on the tension between the law (legal processes) and the actors inside and outside the courts system (social contexts), this text demonstrates how the courts are a product of "law in action," and it presents the course content in a way that enables students to understand not only the "how" of the U.S. criminal court system but also the "why."

Selection of Cases Illustrating Equity Pleading and Practice

' About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Selection of Cases Illustrating Equity Pleading and Practice

Excerpt from Selection of Cases Illustrating Equity Pleading and Practice: With Definitions and Rules of the United States Supreme Court Relating Thereto The pleadings in equity are the written statements of the parties, setting out in conformity with certain established rules, the matters and facts relied upon by the respective parties to the suit, in order to maintain or defeat it, or to obtain or prevent the equitable interposition of the Court con cerning the relief sought (story). A suit in Equity is instituted by a bill, sometimes called a petition; this is a statement of the grounds on which the complainant bases his right to equitable relief.' About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Supreme Court in the American Legal System

One party who might particularly be advantaged is the United States , whose cases are usually briefed and argued by the office of ... Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court ( Chicago : University of Chicago Press , 1980 ) .

The Supreme Court in the American Legal System

This book comprehensively examines the United States legal system. While the most extensive coverage is given to the U.S. Supreme Court, the book also provides separate chapters on state courts, the U.S. District Courts, and the U.S. Courts of Appeals. The book systematically compares the effects of legal and political factors on different courts' decisions. Finally, we provide extended coverage to American legal process, with separate chapters on civil procedure, evidence, and criminal procedure.

A Selection of Cases Illustrating Equity Pleading and Practice

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

A Selection of Cases Illustrating Equity Pleading and Practice

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Supreme Court Decision Making

Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Puro, Steven. 1971. "The Role of Amicus Curiae in the United States Supreme Court." Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Supreme Court Decision Making

What influences decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court? For decades social scientists focused on the ideology of individual justices. Supreme Court Decision Making moves beyond this focus by exploring how justices are influenced by the distinctive features of courts as institutions and their place in the political system. Drawing on interpretive-historical institutionalism as well as rational choice theory, a group of leading scholars consider such factors as the influence of jurisprudence, the unique characteristics of supreme courts, the dynamics of coalition building, and the effects of social movements. The volume's distinguished contributors and broad range make it essential reading for those interested either in the Supreme Court or the nature of institutional politics. Original essays contributed by Lawrence Baum, Paul Brace, Elizabeth Bussiere, Cornell Clayton, Sue Davis, Charles Epp, Lee Epstein, Howard Gillman, Melinda Gann Hall, Ronald Kahn, Jack Knight, Forrest Maltzman, David O'Brien, Jeffrey Segal, Charles Sheldon, James Spriggs II, and Paul Wahlbeck.

The American Supreme Court Sixth Edition

And, of course, Murphy assesses the response of the Court itself to Congress's reaction. (It basically capitulated.) ... Also worth consulting is Doris Marie Provine, Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court (1980).

The American Supreme Court  Sixth Edition

For more than fifty years, Robert G. McCloskey’s classic work on the Supreme Court’s role in constructing the US Constitution has introduced generations of students to the workings of our nation’s highest court. As in prior editions, McCloskey’s original text remains unchanged. In his historical interpretation, he argues that the strength of the Court has always been its sensitivity to the changing political scene, as well as its reluctance to stray too far from the main currents of public sentiment. In this new edition, Sanford Levinson extends McCloskey’s magisterial treatment to address developments since the 2010 election, including the Supreme Court’s decisions regarding the Defense of Marriage Act, the Affordable Care Act, and gay marriage. The best and most concise account of the Supreme Court and its place in American politics, McCloskey's wonderfully readable book is an essential guide to the past, present, and future prospects of this institution.

The Oxford Handbook of U S Judicial Behavior

opinions of see opinions, of U.S. District Courts and policy-making 137 staff of 104,111, 117n.1 U.S. District ... to the U.S. Supreme Court attacks on 61,444 and case selection see case selection, in the U.S. Supreme Court cases dealt ...

The Oxford Handbook of U S  Judicial Behavior

The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Judicial Behavior offers readers a comprehensive introduction and analysis of research regarding decision making by judges serving on federal and state courts in the U.S. Featuring contributions from leading scholars in the field, the Handbook describes and explains how the courts' political and social context, formal institutional structures, and informal norms affect judicial decision making. The Handbook also explores the impact of judges' personal attributes and preferences, as well as prevailing legal doctrine, influence, and shape case outcomes in state and federal courts. The volume also proposes avenues for future research in the various topics addressed throughout the book. Consultant Editor for The Oxford Handbooks of American Politics: George C. Edwards III.

Judicial Process and Judicial Policymaking

State court systems (continued) structure of, 43 supreme courts in, 43 trial courts in, 45 See also Appellate courts State ... 316 U.S. Supreme Court, 42, 154-164 agenda setting in, 154-160, 294-295 caseload of, 42 case selection in, ...

Judicial Process and Judicial Policymaking

JUDICIAL PROCESS AND JUDICIAL POLICYMAKING focuses on policy in its discussion of the judicial process. The author's approach is based on four major premises: 1) that courts in the U.S. have always played an important role in governing and that their role has increased in recent decades; 2) that judicial policymaking is a distinctive activity; 3) that courts make policy in a variety of ways; and 4) that courts may be the objects of public policy, as well as creators. Rather than limit the text to coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, G. Alan Tarr examines the judiciary as the third branch of government. Then he brings students into the debate by asking them to form their own evaluations of the organization, function, and impact of the courts on and within government.

A Mere Machine

Arthur D. Hellman, “The Shrunken Docket of the Rehnquist Court,” 1996 Supreme Court Law Review 403 (1996); David M. O'Brien, ... Case Selection in the United States Supreme Court (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980), 54–62; ...

A Mere Machine

Introductory textbooks on American government tell us that the Supreme Court is independent from the elected branches and that independent courts better protect rights than their more deferential counterparts. But are these facts or myths? In this groundbreaking new work, Anna Harvey reports evidence showing that the Supreme Court is in fact extraordinarily deferential to congressional preferences in its constitutional rulings. Analyzing cross-national evidence, Harvey also finds that the rights protections we enjoy in the United States appear to be largely due to the fact that we do not have an independent Supreme Court. In fact, we would likely have even greater protections for political and economic rights were we to prohibit our federal courts from exercising judicial review altogether. Harvey’s findings suggest that constitutional designers would be wise to heed Thomas Jefferson’s advice to “let mercy be the character of the law-giver, but let the judge be a mere machine.&rdquo