Challenging the Old Order

Only recently has research begun to look at the larger society. Despite this, most areas of traffic policy remain telescopic. This volume begins to remedy that deficit.

Challenging the Old Order

Traditionally, efforts to promote traffic safety have been limited to the sphere of driver, vehicle, and roadway. Only recently has research begun to look at the larger society. Despite this, most areas of traffic policy remain telescopic. This volume begins to remedy that deficit. Too often, traffic safety personnel base their actions on piecemeal data, isolated philosophical direction, and limited conceptualization. Decisions are reached quickly, but without rigorous reflection, and with no comprehensive policy orientation. Rothe and his group have led an innovative effort to develop new orientations in traditional disciplines (such as law, psychology, education, engineering) as well as to identify disciplines that should be contributing to the field (such as qualitative sociology economics, political science, communication, and ethics). Their purpose is to take traffic safety research to a higher plane. This book is the result of a week-long discourse in which internationally renowned scholars presented informed points of view that have not previously been topical in traffic-related research. Their arguments were debated and critiqued by practitioners, researchers, political officials, and other members of the traffic safety community. The result of this unusual approach is a state-of-the-art volume of fundamental importance to policymakers concerned with traffic safety issues.

Development and Globalisation Daring to Think Differently

The first is the futile attempt by the power holders of the old order to sustain that
order, including an outdated and unfair trading regime. The second is the
countervailing power emerging in the South that is challenging the old order. The
world ...

Development and Globalisation  Daring to Think Differently

Challenging the misdirected policies of the last 30 years regarding the South's responsibility to develop itself rather than expect the North to carry the burden, this book offers alternative concepts and paradigms of development for policy makers and peoples' movements on a wide range of issues. It invites readers to "dare to think differently" and be aware of what globalization has turned into in recent years.

International Aid and the Making of a Better World

Nevertheless, the challenges that new donors – erstwhile aid recipients – are
currently posing to international aid's historical identity, ways of working, ...
Erstwhile aid recipients had become donors and were challenging the old order.
That old ...

International Aid and the Making of a Better World

How can international aid professionals manage to deal with the daily dilemmas of working for the wellbeing of people in countries other than their own? A scholar-activist and lifelong development practitioner seeks to answer that question in a book that provides a vivid and accessible insight into the world of aid – its people, ideas and values against the backdrop of a broader historical analysis of the contested ideals and politics of aid operations from the 1960s to the present day. Moving between aid-recipient countries, head office and global policy spaces, Rosalind Eyben critically examines her own behaviour to explore what happens when trying to improve people’s lives in far-away countries and warns how self-deception may construct obstacles to the very change desired, considering the challenge to traditional aid practices posed by new donors like Brazil who speak of history and relationships. The book proposes that to help make this a better world, individuals and organisations working in international development must respond self-critically to the dilemmas of power and knowledge that shape aid’s messy relations. Written in an accessible way with vignettes, stories and dialogue, this critical history of aid provides practical tools and methodology for students in development studies, anthropology and international studies and for development practitioners to adopt the habit of reflexivity when helping to make a better world.

Red Petrograd

The industrial and commercial bourgeoisie thus never really developed into a
political force capable of challenging the old order. It was to prove a far less
dynamic social class than the proletariat, and this social weakness was mirrored
in its ...

Red Petrograd

Deals with problem of workers' control in Russia.

Sociology Work and Industry

... England, where the lndustrial Revolution was later to occur, we see a rising
bourgeoisie challenging the old order in such a way that, by 1688, their political
action and parliamentary triumph had brought about a bourgeois revolution.

Sociology  Work and Industry

In the fourth edition of this successful and popular text, Tony Watson explains how the discipline of sociology contributes to our wider understanding of the variety of work practices and institutions, which exist in modern society. The new edition outlines both what has been achieved historically and what is currently being achieved by the sociological study of work, as well presenting a range of concepts, models and other theoretical ideas that students and researchers can apply to the study of work. Subjects covered include: * how working patterns have changed, and continued to change since the industrial revolution * work organizations * innovations in the structuring of work activities at the enterprise level * the occupational aspects of the organization of work in changing societies * how people experience and cope with the pressures, insecurities and inequalities of a restructured world of work * how challenge and resistance influence the shaping of work in an ever-changing world. Fully updated throughout, this book includes an all-new chapter on the distinctiveness of the sociological perspective along with guidance on the research and analysis of work. It will be essential reading for anybody studying the sociology of work and organizations.

The Church and the Free Market

Jesus taught was based on a theology which included those that seem to have
been excluded under the old order . Of course in challenging this system Jesus
also was destroying the authority of those who had a vested interest in its ...

The Church and the Free Market

Politics and religion combine when governments contract out welfare services to church welfare agencies. This practice raises questions of the autonomy of church agencies, maintenance of their distinctively Christian value base, and the extent to which the Church is being co-opted into government policy.

Palmerston

Almack's Club may have been abuzz with gossip about filling places in the new
Whig Cabinet in November 1830, but across Europe the talk was of revolution
again challenging the old order. Greece had its independence guaranteed by the
 ...

Palmerston

In serving more than fifty years in public life, Palmerston placed his stamp upon nineteenth-century Britain. Born and bred an eighteenth-century aristocrat, he initially seemed out of place in a world stirred by the twin forces of the French and Industrial Revolutions, and more suited to the dandified life of the beau monde. As a conservative politician, he appeared ill fit for an age of reform, and as Foreign Secretary his gunboat diplomacy courted war and revolution at a time when European diplomats were seeking peace and stability. However, as Paul R. Ziegler's compelling biography shows, the 3rd Viscount Palmerston was a man of contradictions. Despite his aristocratic roots and playboy image, Palmerston was a tireless public servant and a meticulous planner, who identified himself with the people and became their natural spokesperson - a role which culminated in his eventual election as Prime Minister. Whilst fearing the advent of democracy, he was willing to experiment with reform; and although seemingly averse to the onrush of modernity, he nevertheless seized the initiative both at home and abroad in leading his nation into the future. Taking into account recent scholarship and revisionist approaches, Ziegler authoritatively reviews the life of this well-known political figure and reassesses his contribution to the nineteenth century - demonstrating that, in facing new challenges, Palmerston adjusted himself to the times and helped to usher Britain into the modern age.

Challenging Modernity

His comment might in fact be extended to modernists generally : modernism , as
seen in the previous chapter , is characterised precisely by the search for order in
a chaotic world , whether an old order resuscitated from the past , or a new one ...

Challenging Modernity

This book, for the first time, examines in depth the link between modernism and postmodernism and demonstrates the extensive similarities, as well as the few crucial differences between the ideas and art of the Dadaists on the one hand, and those of contemporary postmodern thinkers and artists on the other.

A Spy s London

... energetic, challenging the old order, challenging Britain. However, the USSR
and the US threatened different aspects of British tradition: the USSR would
replace capitalism with communism, while the US would replace the class system
with ...

A Spy s London

A historical tour of London landmarks for anyone fascinated by intrigue and espionage . . . Includes maps and photos. James Bond may be fictional—but London is indeed the espionage capital of the world. This book takes us through the city’s espionage history, with evocative photos and compelling stories and observations about 136 landmarks, conveniently organized into manageable walking tours for those living in or visiting the city. Go behind the façades of ordinary buildings to learn more about clandestine operations: from the modest hotel suite where an eager Red Army colonel poured out his secrets to a team of British and American intelligence officers, to the royal residence where one of the most slippery Soviet moles was at home for years, and the London home where an MP plotting to appease Hitler was arrested on his front steps in 1940.

Political Parties and the Collapse of the Old Orders

The major parties would testify to an old order where party affiliation was a sort of
emotional and affective bond ... 1990s , in many countries , other parties on the
extreme right of the political spectrum were challenging the established parties .

Political Parties and the Collapse of the Old Orders

With the passage of the Cold War, political parties in nearly every corner of the globe have undergone a vast upheaval. Political Parties and the Collapse of the Old Orders describes these changes using several countries as laboratories: the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Canada, Australia, Mexico, Israel, South Africa, and Russia. In this "new world order," the old political arrangements and old ways of doing things have disappeared. The altered states of political parties in the post-Cold War world pose a central question: what does change look like? The answers given here illuminate our understanding of why the world has changed and how political parties are attempting to cope with it.

Challenging Authority

Even the experiences of 1917 failed to provoke the discontent to dynamite the old
order and raise a new type of revolutionary leadership . The artisanal leaders
never envisaged a radically new order ; instead , they continued to act in the old ...

Challenging Authority

As long as there have been formal governments, there has been political contention, an interaction between ruler and subjects involving claims and counterclaims, compliance or resistance, cooperation, resignation, condescension, and resentment. Where political studies tend to focus on either those who rule or those who are ruled, the essays in this volume call our attention to the interaction between these forces at the very heart of contentious politics. Written by prominent scholars of political and social history, these essays introduce us to a variety of political actors: peasants and workers, tax resisters and religious visionaries, bandits and revolutionaries. From Brazil to Beijing, from the late Middle Ages to the present, all were or are challenging authority. The authors take a distinctly historical approach to their subject, writing both of specific circumstances and of larger processes. While tracing their origins to the social history and structural sociology approaches of the sixties and seventies, the contributors have also profited from subsequent critiques of these approaches. Taken together, their essays demonstrate that the relationship between mobilization for collective action and identity formation is a perennial problem for protest groups -- a problem that the historical study of contentious politics, with its focus on political interaction, can do much to explain.

Challenging governance theory

Observations challenging the transformation thesis can then be depicted merely
as recording the death throes of an old order. Steen and Wayenberg's (2003, p
266) finding that Belgium's citizen advisory boards lack legitimacy because they ...

Challenging governance theory

Theories heralding the rise of network governance have dominated for a generation. Yet, empirical research suggests that claims for the transformative potential of networks are exaggerated. This topical and timely book takes a critical look at contemporary governance theory, elaborating a Gramscian alternative. It argues that, although the ideology of networks has been a vital element in the neoliberal hegemonic project, there are major structural impediments to accomplishing it. While networking remains important, the hierarchical and coercive state is vital for the maintenance of social order and integral to the institutions of contemporary governance. Reconsidering it from Marxist and Gramscian perspectives, the book argues that the hegemonic ideology of networks is utopian and rejects the claim that there has been a transformation from 'government' to 'governance'. This important book has international appeal and will be essential reading for scholars and students of governance, public policy, human geography, public management, social policy and sociology.

Family History in the Middle East

... within a rigid social order that based its stability on the organization of families
by trades and religious communities . By the mid - nineteenth century , however ,
strong forces of renewal were emerging in Cairo and challenging the old order .

Family History in the Middle East

Challenges conventional assumptions about the family and the modern Middle East.

Challenging Social Work

D. Held, and A. McGrew, 'The End of the Old Order? Globalisation and the
Prospects for World Order', Review of International Studies, 24 (1998) 219–143.
P. Henman and M. Adler, 'Information Technology and the Governance of Social
 ...

Challenging Social Work

Taking account of the political, economic and cultural changes that have impacted on social work over recent years, this book explores the challenges and presents the realities of practice. Using an international range of examples, McDonald makes an important contribution to the ongoing debate about the character and purpose of social work.

Challenging the Injustice of Poverty

The estimates of khas land are open to contestation since land records are poor
and open to legal challenge. ... This policy, however, was hardly implemented, so
that the old order continued with power and money playing a more predominant ...

Challenging the Injustice of Poverty

This book explores issues related to poverty in South Asia in a two-pronged manner-by focusing on injustice created and perpetuated by the unjust nature of a social order as its source and then providing concrete suggestions about how policymakers may move to challenge these injustices. Drawing research inputs from studies across various South Asian countries, the book redefines poverty as a process where certain sections of the society are excluded from equal participation in development opportunities as well as decision-making. It further identifies a variety of operational ideas for policymakers, political activists and civil society advocacy groups committed to build a more just and poverty free society in South Asia

The Orthodox Church and Civil Society in Russia

To these reformers, he served as the equivalent of an Andrei Sakharov in politics
challenging the old order and stressing the need for greater openness.2 His
books enjoyed a wide circulation, both among intellectuals and ordinary people;
 ...

The Orthodox Church and Civil Society in Russia

"In the void left by the fall of Communism in Russia during the late twentieth century, can that country establish a true civil society? Many scholars have analyzed the political landscape to answer this question, but in The Orthodox Church and Civil Society in Russia, Wallace L. Daniel offers a unique perspective: within the church are individuals who hold the values and institutional models that can be vital in determining the direction of Russia in the twenty-first century. What the "tireless workers" of the church are doing and whether they will succeed in building a new cultural infrastructure are questions of crucial importance." "Daniel tells the stories of a teacher and controversial parish priest, the leader of Russia's most famous women's monastery, a newspaper editor, and a parish priest at Moscow University to explore thoroughly and with a human voice the transformation from Communist country to a new social order, focusing on normal, everyday realities. Unlike other scholars, who have concentrated on government and politics or looked only within the church's Moscow patriarchy, Daniel explores specific religious communities and the way they operate, their efforts to rebuild parish life, and the individuals who have devoted themselves to such goals. This is the level, Daniel shows, at which the reconstruction of Russia and the revitalization of Russian society is taking place." "This book is written for general readers interested in the intersection between politics, religion, and society, as well as for scholars. The subject and the approach cut across several disciplines: area and cultural studies, history, political science, and religious studies."--Jacket.

Global Population

“The pressure of population crying for a new orientation of policy, the irresistible
force of democracy challenging the old order . . . the changing psychology of the
nation after sixty years of occidentalization and the consciousness of the dawn of
 ...

Global Population

Concern about the size of the world's population did not begin with the "population bomb" in 1968. It arose in the aftermath of World War I and was understood as an issue with far-reaching ecological, agricultural, economic, and geopolitical consequences. The world population problem concerned the fertility of soil as much as the fertility of women, always involving both "earth" and "life." Global Population traces the idea of a world population problem as it evolved from the 1920s through the 1960s. The growth and distribution of the human population over the planet's surface came deeply to shape the characterization of "civilizations" with different standards of living. It forged the very ideas of development, demographically defined three worlds, and, for some, an aspirational "one world." Drawing on international conference transcripts and personal and organizational archives, this book reconstructs the twentieth-century population problem in terms of migration, colonial expansion, globalization, and world food plans. Population was a problem in which international relations and intimate relations were one. Global Population ultimately shows how a geopolitical problem about sovereignty over land morphed into a biopolitical solution, entailing sovereignty over one's person.

Dangerous Edges of Graham Greene

Far-reaching political, social, and intellectual changes, the rise of mass parties
and militant nationalism had started challenging the old order, and proved the
perfect breeding ground for a plethora of scholars, thinkers, and pioneers in the
arts ...

Dangerous Edges of Graham Greene

Informative, broad-ranging, and sheds new light on the life and literary art of one of the last century's most celebrated authors.

Faith and Fear in Flushing

And there were the Mets climbing through the National League East, challenging
the old order, the Phillies; and the nouveau riche, the Cubs who had restocked
on the fly, for first place. Something had to give and it wasn't going to be the Mets,
 ...

Faith and Fear in Flushing

A lighthearted account of fan culture surrounding the New York baseball franchise, written by the creator of the popular Mets blog by the same title, address the unique qualities of the team's fandom while covering such topics as their history-making 1969 season, their 1986 comeback, and their transition from Shea Stadium to Citi Field.