Women Patronage and Salvation in Renaissance Florence

10 Adrian W. B. Randolph, “Gendering the Period Eye: Deschi da parto and Renaissance Visual Culture,” Art History 27, ... see Jill Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park: ...

 Women  Patronage  and Salvation in Renaissance Florence

Long obfuscated by modern definitions of historical evidence and art patronage, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de? Medici?s impact on the visual world of her time comes to light in this book, the first full-length scholarly argument for a lay woman?s contributions to the visual arts of fifteenth-century Florence. This focused investigation of the Medici family?s domestic altarpiece, Filippo Lippi?s Adoration of the Christ Child, is broad in its ramifications. Mapping out the cultural network of gender, piety, and power in which Lippi?s painting was originally embedded, author Stefanie Solum challenges the received wisdom that women played little part in actively shaping visual culture during the Florentine Quattrocento. She uses visual evidence never before brought to bear on the topic to reveal that Lucrezia Tornabuoni - shrewd power-broker, pious poetess, and mother of the 'Magnificent' Lorenzo de? Medici - also had a profound impact on the visual arts. Lucrezia emerges as a fascinating key to understanding the ways in which female lay religiosity created the visual world of Renaissance Florence. The Medici case study establishes, at long last, a robust historical basis for the assertion of women?s agency and patronage in the deeply patriarchal and artistically dynamic society of Quattrocento Florence. As such, it offers a new paradigm for the understanding, and future study, of female patronage during this period.

Images and Identity in Fifteenth century Florence

In her Changing Patrons : Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence , J. Burke assesses recent approaches to the study of patronage , particularly as applied to art history , and uses specific cases ( the Nasi and ...

Images and Identity in Fifteenth century Florence

An exploration of ways of looking in Renaissance Florence, where works of art were part of a complex process of social exchange Renaissance Florence, of endless fascination for the beauty of its art and architecture, is no less intriguing for its dynamic political, economic, and social life. In this book Patricia Lee Rubin crosses the boundaries of all these areas to arrive at an original and comprehensive view of the place of images in Florentine society. The author asks an array of questions: Why were works of art made? Who were the artists who made them, and who commissioned them? How did they look, and how were they looked at? She demonstrates that the answers to such questions illuminate the contexts in which works of art were created, and how they were valued and viewed. Rubin seeks out the meeting places of meaning in churches, in palaces, in piazzas--places of exchange where identities were taken on and transformed, often with the mediation of images. She concentrates on questions of vision and visuality, on "seeing and being seen." With a blend of exceptional illustrations; close analyses of sacred and secular paintings by artists including Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi, Filippino Lippi, and Botticelli; and wide-ranging bibliographic essays, the book shines new light on fifteenth-century Florence, a special place that made beauty one of its defining features.

The Patron s Payoff

Conspicuous Commissions in Italian Renaissance Art Jonathan K. Nelson, Richard J. Zeckhauser ... Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University park: pennsylvania State University press, 2004), ...

The Patron s Payoff

An analysis of Italian Renaissance art from the perspective of the patrons who made 'conspicuous commissions', this text builds on three concepts from the economics of information - signaling, signposting, and stretching - to develop a systematic methodology for assessing the meaning of patronage.

Art Patronage Family and Gender in Renaissance Florence

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. Burke, Peter. The Italian Renaissance: Culture and Society in Italy.3rdrev.ed.

Art Patronage  Family  and Gender in Renaissance Florence

This book examines a Renaissance Florentine family's art patronage, even for women, inspired by literature, music, love, loss, and religion.

Art and Violence in Early Renaissance Florence

181–200 Bullen, J. B., The Myth of the Renaissance in NineteenthCentury Writing, Oxford, 1994 Burke, J., Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence, University Park, PA, 2004 Burke, J., 'Meaning and ...

Art and Violence in Early Renaissance Florence

This study is the first to examine the relationship between art and violence in 15th-century Florence, exposing the underbelly of a period more often celebrated for enlightened and progressive ideas. Renaissance Florentines were constantly subjected to the sight of violence, whether in carefully staged rituals of execution or images of the suffering inflicted on Christ. There was nothing new in this culture of pain, unlike the aesthetic of violence that developed towards the end of the 15th century. It emerged in the work of artists such as Piero di Cosimo, Bertoldo di Giovanni, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, and the young Michelangelo. Inspired by the art of antiquity, they painted, engraved, and sculpted images of deadly battles, ultimately normalizing representations of brutal violence. Drawing on work in social and literary history, as well as art history, Scott Nethersole sheds light on the relationship between these Renaissance images, violence, and ideas of artistic invention and authorship.

Audience and Reception in the Early Modern Period

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. Cadagin, Sarah Mellott. “The Altarpieces of Domenico Ghirlandaio (1449–1494): Between Heaven and ...

Audience and Reception in the Early Modern Period

Early modern audiences, readerships, and viewerships were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few variables) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, dramatic and musical performances, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which each of these were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. The chapters in this volume explore the ways in which authors, poets, artists, preachers, theologians, playwrights, and performers took account of and encoded pluriform potential audiences, readers, and viewers in their works, and how these varied parties encountered and responded to these works. The contributors here investigate these complex interactions through a variety of critical and methodological lenses.

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

Three households of the earlier kind, dating from 1488 to 1511, are described by Jill Burke in Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park, PA, 2004), 49–61; the interior of the Strozzi ...

The Economy of Renaissance Florence

Richard A. Goldthwaite, a leading economic historian of the Italian Renaissance, has spent his career studying the Florentine economy. In this magisterial work, Goldthwaite brings together a lifetime of research and insight on the subject, clarifying and explaining the complex workings of Florence's commercial, banking, and artisan sectors. Florence was one of the most industrialized cities in medieval Europe, thanks to its thriving textile industries. The importation of raw materials and the exportation of finished cloth necessitated the creation of commercial and banking practices that extended far beyond Florence's boundaries. Part I situates Florence within this wider international context and describes the commercial and banking networks through which the city's merchant-bankers operated. Part II focuses on the urban economy of Florence itself, including various industries, merchants, artisans, and investors. It also evaluates the role of government in the economy, the relationship of the urban economy to the region, and the distribution of wealth throughout the society. While political, social, and cultural histories of Florence abound, none focuses solely on the economic history of the city. The Economy of Renaissance Florence offers both a systematic description of the city's major economic activities and a comprehensive overview of its economic development from the late Middle Ages through the Renaissance to 1600. -- Brian Maxson

Historical Dictionary of Renaissance Art

The Painter's Practice in Renaissance Tuscany. ... The World of the Florentine Renaissance Artist: Projects and Patrons, Workshop and Art Market. Trans. ... Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence.

Historical Dictionary of Renaissance Art

This second edition of Historical Dictionary of Renaissance Art contains a chronology, an introduction, and a bibliography. The dictionary section has over 700 cross-referenced entries on artists from Italy, Flanders, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, and Portugal, historical figures and events that impacted the production of Renaissance art.

Visual Cultures of Foundling Care in Renaissance Italy

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence. university Park: Pennsylvania State university Press, 2004. Burroughs, Charles. “Below the Angel: An urbanistic Project in the Rome of Pope nicholas V.” ...

Visual Cultures of Foundling Care in Renaissance Italy

The social problem of infant abandonment captured the public?s imagination in Italy during the fifteenth century, a critical period of innovation and development in charitable discourses. As charity toward foundlings became a political priority, the patrons and supporters of foundling hospitals turned to visual culture to help them make their charitable work understandable to a wide audience. Focusing on four institutions in central Italy that possess significant surviving visual and archival material, Visual Cultures of Foundling Care in Renaissance Italy examines the discursive processes through which foundling care was identified, conceptualized, and promoted. The first book to consider the visual culture of foundling hospitals in Renaissance Italy, this study looks beyond the textual evidence to demonstrate that the institutional identities of foundling hospitals were articulated by means of a wide variety of visual forms, including book illumination, altarpieces, fresco cycles, institutional insignia, processional standards, prints, and reliquaries. The author draws on fields as diverse as art history, childhood studies, the history of charity, Renaissance studies, gender studies, sociology, and the history of religion to elucidate the pivotal role played by visual culture in framing and promoting the charitable succor of foundlings.

The A to Z of Renaissance Art

The World of the Florentine Renaissance Artist: Projects and Patrons, Workshop and Art Market. Translated by Alison Luchs. ... Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence. University Park: Pennsylvania ...

The A to Z of Renaissance Art

The Renaissance era was launched in Italy and gradually spread to the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, France, and other parts of Europe and the New World, with figures like Robert Campin, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Albrecht DYrer, and Albrecht Altdorfer. It was the era that produced some of the icons of civilization, including Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa and Last Supper and Michelangelo's Sistine Ceiling, Piet^, and David. Marked as one of the greatest moments in history, the outburst of creativity of the era resulted in the most influential artistic revolution ever to have taken place. The period produced a substantial number of notable masters, among them Caravaggio, Donato Bramante, Donatello, El Greco, Filippo Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Sandro Botticelli, Raphael, Titian, and Tintoretto. The result was an outstanding number of exceptional works of art and architecture that pushed human potential to new heights. The A to Z of Renaissance Art covers the years 1250 to 1648, the period most disciplines place as the Renaissance Era. A complete portrait of this remarkable period is depicted in this book through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 500 hundred cross-referenced dictionary entries on major Renaissance painters, sculptors, architects, and patrons, as well as relevant historical figures and events, the foremost artistic centers, schools and periods, major themes and subjects, noteworthy commissions, technical processes, theoretical material, literary and philosophic sources for art, and art historical terminology.

A Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art

Siena: Continuity and Change in the Aspect of the City,” in Renaissance Siena: Art in Context, ed. ... Welch, Art and Authority. ... Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence.

A Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art

A Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art provides adiverse, fresh collection of accessible, comprehensive essaysaddressing key issues for European art produced between 1300 and1700, a period that might be termed the beginning of modernhistory. Presents a collection of original, in-depth essays from artexperts that address various aspects of European visual artsproduced from circa 1300 to 1700 Divided into five broad conceptual headings: Social-HistoricalFactors in Artistic Production; Creative Process and Social Statureof the Artist; The Object: Art as Material Culture; The Message:Subjects and Meanings; and The Viewer, the Critic, and theHistorian: Reception and Interpretation as Cultural Discourse Covers many topics not typically included in collections ofthis nature, such as Judaism and the arts, architectural treatises,the global Renaissance in arts, the new natural sciences and thearts, art and religion, and gender and sexuality Features essays on the arts of the domestic life, sexuality andgender, and the art and production of tapestries,conservation/technology, and the metaphor of theater Focuses on Western and Central Europe and that territory'sinteractions with neighboring civilizations and distantdiscoveries Includes illustrations as well as links to images not includedin the book

Venus and the Arts of Love in Renaissance Florence

Red: The Art and Science of a Colour. ... Buhler, Stephen M. “Marsilio Ficino's De stella magorum and Renaissance Views of the Magi. ... Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence.

Venus and the Arts of Love in Renaissance Florence

In this volume, Rebekah Compton offers the first survey of Venus in the art, culture, and governance of Florence from 1300 to 1600. Organized chronologically, each of the six chapters investigates one of the goddess's alluring attributes – her golden splendor, rosy-hued complexion, enchanting fashions, green gardens, erotic anatomy, and gifts from the sea. By examining these attributes in the context of the visual arts, Compton uncovers an array of materials and techniques employed by artists, patrons, rulers, and lovers to manifest Venusian virtues. Her book explores technical art history in the context of love's protean iconography, showing how different discourses and disciplines can interact in the creation and reception of art. Venus and the Arts of Love offers new insights on sight, seduction, and desire, as well as concepts of gender, sexuality, and viewership from both male and female perspectives in the early modern era.

Art and Identity in Early Modern Rome

(Florence: Olschki, 1986); M. Fagiolo, La festa a Roma dal Rinascimento al 1870, 2 volumes (Turin: Allemandi, ... 2003); J. Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park: Penn ...

Art and Identity in Early Modern Rome

From the late fifteenth to the late seventeenth century, Rome was one of the most vibrant and productive centres for the visual arts in the West. Artists from all over Europe came to the city to see its classical remains and its celebrated contemporary art works, as well as for the opportunity to work for its many wealthy patrons. They contributed to the eclecticism of the Roman artistic scene, and to the diffusion of 'Roman' artistic styles in Europe and beyond. Art and Identity in Early Modern Rome is the first book-length study to consider identity creation and artistic development in Rome during this period. Drawing together an international cast of key scholars in the field of Renaissance studies, the book adroitly demonstrates how the exceptional quality of Roman court and urban culture - with its elected 'monarchy', its large foreign population, and unique sense of civic identity - interacted with developments in the visual arts. With its distinctive chronological span and uniquely interdisciplinary approach, Art and Identity in Early Modern Rome puts forward an alternative history of the visual arts in early modern Rome, one that questions traditional periodisation and stylistic categorisation.

A History of Florence 1200 1575

Although this patronage was private in the sense that wealthy individuals hired and paid artists and builders, ... 2' J. Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park, Penn., ...

A History of Florence  1200   1575

In this history of Florence, distinguished historian John Najemy discusses all the major developments in Florentine history from 1200 to 1575. Captures Florence's transformation from a medieval commune into an aristocratic republic, territorial state, and monarchy Weaves together intellectual, cultural, social, economic, religious, and political developments Academically rigorous yet accessible and appealing to the general reader Likely to become the standard work on Renaissance Florence for years to come

Mendicants and Merchants in the Medieval Mediterranean

20 Recent studies on the subject of Florentine patronage include Jill Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004); Philip ...

Mendicants and Merchants in the Medieval Mediterranean

Mendicants and Merchants in the Medieval Mediterranean, edited by Chubb and Kelley, offers an interdisciplinary study of the mutually beneficial relationships that developed between merchants and the mendicant orders during the late Middle Ages.

Friendship Love and Trust in Renaissance Florence

For the most extensive discussion of this work, and the argument about the new friendship between patrons and artists, see Jill Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence (University Park, ...

Friendship  Love  and Trust in Renaissance Florence

The question of whether true friendship could exist in an era of patronage occupied Renaissance Florentines as it had the ancient Greeks and Romans whose culture they admired and emulated. Rather than attempting to measure Renaissance friendship against a universal ideal defined by essentially modern notions of disinterestedness, intimacy, and sincerity, in this book Dale Kent explores the meaning of love and friendship as they were represented in the fifteenth century, particularly the relationship between heavenly and human friendship. She documents the elements of shared experience in friendships between Florentines of various occupations and ranks, observing how these were shaped and played out in the physical spaces of the city: the streets, street corners, outdoor benches and loggias, family palaces, churches, confraternal meeting places, workshops of artisans and artists, taverns, dinner tables, and the baptismal font. Finally, Kent examines the betrayal of trust, focusing on friends at moments of crisis or trial in which friendships were tested, and failed or endured. The exile of Cosimo de’ Medici in 1433 and his recall in 1434, the attempt in 1466 of the Medici family’s closest friends to take over their patronage network, and the Pazzi conspiracy to assassinate Lorenzo and Giuliano de’ Medici in 1478 expose the complexity and ambivalence of Florentine friendship, a combination of patronage with mutual intellectual passion and love—erotic, platonic, and Christian—sublimely expressed in the poetry and art of Michelangelo.

Patronage and Italian Renaissance Sculpture

... “The Early Medici as Patrons of Art,” in Norm and Form: Studies in the Art of the Renaissance I (London: Phaidon Press, 1966), 35–57; Jill Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence ...

Patronage and Italian Renaissance Sculpture

The first book to be dedicated to the topic, Patronage and Italian Renaissance Sculpture reappraises the creative and intellectual roles of sculptor and patron. The volume surveys artistic production from the Trecento to the Cinquecento in Rome, Pisa, Florence, Bologna, and Venice. Using a broad range of approaches, the essayists question the traditional concept of authorship in Italian Renaissance sculpture, setting each work of art firmly into a complex socio-historical context. Emphasizing the role of the patron, the collection re-assesses the artistic production of such luminaries as Michelangelo, Donatello, and Giambologna, as well as lesser-known sculptors. Contributors shed new light on the collaborations that shaped Renaissance sculpture and its reception.

Renaissance Art Science Florence

Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in Renaissance Florence. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. Butters, Suzanne B. The Triumph of Vulcan: Sculptors' Tools, Porphyry, and the Prince in Ducal ...

Renaissance Art   Science   Florence

The creativity of the human mind was brilliantly displayed during the Florentine Renaissance when artists, mathematicians, astronomers, apothecaries, architects, and others embraced the interconnectedness of their disciplines. Artists used mathematical perspective in painting and scientific techniques to create new materials; hospitals used art to invigorate the soul; apothecaries prepared and dispensed, often from the same plants, both medicinals for patients and pigments for painters; utilitarian glassware and maps became objects to be admired for their beauty; art enhanced depictions of scientific observations; and innovations in construction made buildings canvases for artistic grandeur. An exploration of these and other intersections of art and science deepens our appreciation of the magnificent contributions of the extraordinary Florentines.

Collecting Art in the Italian Renaissance Court

... as a similar mistake was made in relation to marriage chests, see Manca, Art of Ercole, 199–201, Docs. ... Public Life in Renaissance Florence (London, 1980), 247; Jill Burke, Changing Patrons: Social Identity and the Visual Arts in ...

Collecting Art in the Italian Renaissance Court

In this book, Leah R. Clark examines collecting practices across the Italian Renaissance court, exploring the circulation, exchange, collection, and display of objects. Rather than focusing on patronage strategies or the political power of individual collectors, she uses the objects themselves to elucidate the dynamic relationships formed through their exchange. Her study brings forward the mechanisms that structured relations within the court, and most importantly, also with individuals, representations, and spaces outside the court. The volume examines the courts of Italy through the wide variety of objects - statues, paintings, jewellery, furniture, and heraldry - that were valued for their subject matter, material forms, histories, and social functions. As Clark shows, the late fifteenth-century Italian court an be located not only in the body of the prince, but also in the objects that constituted symbolic practices, initiated political dialogues, caused rifts, created memories, and formed associations.