Changing Practices of Doctoral Education

Changing Practices of Doctoral Education

Postgraduate research has undergone unprecedented change in the past ten years, in response to major shifts in the role of the university and the disciplines in knowledge production and the management of intellectual work. New kinds of doctorates have been established that have expanded the scope and direction of doctoral education. A new audience of supervisors, academic managers and graduate school personnel is engaging in debates about the nature, purpose and future of doctoral education and how institutions and departments can best respond to the increasing demands that are being made. Discussion of the emerging issues and agendas is set within the context of the international policy shifts that are occurring and considers the implications of these shifts on the changing external environment. This engaging book acquaints the readers with new international trends in doctoral education identifies new practices in supervision, research, teaching and learning enables practitioners of doctoral education to contribute to the debates and help shape new understandings questions the purposes of doctoral study and how they are changing considers the balance between equipping students as researchers and the conduct of original research Including contributions from both those who have conducted formal research on research education and those whose own practice is breaking new ground within their universities, this thought-provoking book draws on the expertise of those currently making a stimulating contribution to the literature on doctoral education.

Reshaping Doctoral Education

International Approaches and Pedagogies

Reshaping Doctoral Education

The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face. Drawing on research from around the world the individual authors contribute to a previously under-represented focus of theorising the emerging practices of doctoral education and the shape of change in this arena. Key aspects, expertly discussed by contributors from the UK, USA, Australia, New Zealand, China, South Africa, Sweden and Denmark include: the changing nature of doctoral education the need for systematic and principled accounts of doctoral pedagogies the importance of disciplinary specificity the relationship between pedagogy and knowledge generation issues of transdisciplinarity. Reshaping Doctoral Education provides rich accounts of traditional and more innovative pedagogical practices within a range of doctoral systems in different disciplines, professional fields and geographical locations, providing the reader with a trustworthy and scholarly platform from which to design the doctioral experience. It will prove an essential resource for anyone involved in doctorate studies, whether as students, supervisors, researchers, administrators, teachers or mentors.

The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing

The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing

The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing is a groundbreaking resource that offers emerging and experienced scholars from all disciplines a comprehensive review of the essential elements needed to craft scholarly papers and other writing suitable for submission to academic journals. The authors discuss the components of different types of manuscripts, explain the submission process, and offer readers suggestions for working with editors and coauthors, dealing with rejection, and rewriting and resubmitting their work. They include advice for developing quality writing skills, outline the fundamentals of a good review, and offer guidance for becoming an excellent manuscript reviewer. "One of those rare books that will teach you something new every time you pick it up. It belongs on the desks of emerging scholars and writing professors everywhere."—Nancy L. Zimpher, chancellor, The State University of New York "Rocco and Hatcher have done every scholar, doctoral student, and committee chair a huge favor by putting this book together. Now in one place we can find resources to help graduate students and scholars get over their writing blocks and fear of writing, and learn how to write successfully."—Alan L. Carsrud, Loretta Rogers Chair of Entrepreneurship Research, Ryerson University, and associate editor, Journal of Small Business Management "This handbook performs a valuable service by collecting the wisdom of scholars from different disciplines and countries and offering publishing guidance that is both rigorous and systematic. Everyone who writes for scholarly publication will benefit from the insights provided by this book."—Tom Radko, editor, Journal of Scholarly Publishing

Rethinking the Education Improvement Agenda

A Critical Philosophical Approach

Rethinking the Education Improvement Agenda

Offering a philosophical perspective to the educational improvement agenda, this engaging text provides a new language for research into educational improvement, bringing leading-edge philosophy to current practice. Drawing on philosophical work, including that of Derrida, Foucault and Heidegger, the authors deconstruct the ethic of improvement before exploring key dimensions of education, its institutions and technologies. Each chapter draws on international case studies, provides engaging questions and makes suggestions for further reading to support the reader. Topics covered include: • The Ethic of Improvement • Teacher Education • Leadership and Management • Lifelong Learning • The Rhetoric of Numbers • The Governance of Childhood • The State of Education Research An essential text for all looking at how we think and talk about education and improvement.

Doctoral Education: Research-Based Strategies for Doctoral Students, Supervisors and Administrators

Doctoral Education: Research-Based Strategies for Doctoral Students, Supervisors and Administrators

The quality of the academics who undertake the work of teaching and research is critical to the significance, status and relevance of our universities. There is widespread evidence that doctoral students are not being properly prepared for the changing face of higher education and that once they take up academic positions, they often experience many frustrations and tensions. This book, based on a four-year-long research program conducted by four academics and four graduate students, investigates the experiences of doctoral students, new academics and senior academics as they engage in their work related to doctoral education. Doctoral Education: Research-Based Strategies for Doctoral Students, Supervisors and Administrators offers research-based strategies for improving doctoral education in a non-technical and conversational way. Those strategies include learning to be a new supervisor alongside other academic work, developing an intellectual network during the doctoral journey, giving and receiving feedback on scholarly writing, and preparing for the oral defence. Also, based on research evidence, the book challenges taken-for-granted practices and policies surrounding doctoral education, including the gendered nature of disciplinary practices, the paradox of writing in doctoral education and the public oversight of more and more aspects of academic work. Intended for doctoral students, academics, staff and administrators, this book provides several perspectives on the topic of doctoral education and contains the actual voices of doctoral students and new academics to illustrate its discussion.

Doing Work Based Research

Approaches to Enquiry for Insider-Researchers

Doing Work Based Research

Electronic Inspection Copy available for instructors here With the growth of work based learning and practitioner research this book leads the way by addressing key issues faced by 'insider-researchers' - learners, practitioners and managers doing research projects in the organizations and communities in which they themselves work, or where they are already familiar with the setting. The authors explore the implications of these research contexts, and discuss approaches and methodologies that work based researchers might adopt, with a particular focus on ethics - one of the key concerns for those undertaking a research project of this type. This book is an authoritative and readable guide to the theory and practice of work based research. It is for anyone undertaking a research project based on work practice, including learners on postgraduate, undergraduate and doctoral programmes. Practitioners, managers and participants in work based courses or modules in education, healthcare and business management, will find it particularly useful.

The Education of Historians for Twenty-first Century

The Education of Historians for Twenty-first Century

In 1958, the American Historical Association began a study to determine the status and condition of history education in U.S. colleges and universities. Published in 1962 and addressing such issues as the supply and demand for teachers, student recruitment, and training for advanced degrees, that report set a lasting benchmark against which to judge the study of history thereafter. Now, more than forty years later, the AHA has commissioned a new report. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century documents this important new study's remarkable conclusions. Both the American academy and the study of history have been dramatically transformed since the original study, but doctoral programs in history have barely changed. This report from the AHA explains why and offers concrete, practical recommendations for improving the state of graduate education. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century stands as the first investigation of graduate training for historians in more than four decades and the best available study of doctoral education in any major academic discipline. Prepared for the AHA by the Committee on Graduate Education, the report represents the combined efforts of a cross-section of the entire historical profession. It draws upon a detailed review of the existing studies and data on graduate education and builds upon this foundation with an exhaustive survey of history doctoral programs. This included actual visits to history departments across the country and consultations with scores of individual historians, graduate students, deans, academic and non-academic employers of historians, as well as other stakeholders in graduate education. As the ethnic and gender composition of both graduate students and faculty has changed, methodologies have been refined and the domains of historical inquiry expanded. By addressing these revolutionary intellectual and demographic changes in the historical profession, The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century breaks important new ground. Combining a detailed historical snapshot of the profession with a rigorous analysis of these intellectual changes, this volume is ideally positioned as the definitive guide to strategic planning for history departments. It includes practical recommendations for handling institutional challenges as well as advice for everyone involved in the advanced training of historians, from department chairs to their students, and from university administrators to the AHA itself. Although focused on history, there are lessons here for any department. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century is a model for in-depth analysis of doctoral education, with recommendations and analyses that have implications for the entire academy. This volume is required reading for historians, graduate students, university administrators, or anyone interested in the future of higher education.

The Sociology of Higher Education

Reproduction, Transformation and Change in a Global Era

The Sociology of Higher Education

The Sociology of Higher Education: Reproduction, Transformation and Change in a Global Era provides an exciting and conceptually rich approach to the sociology of higher education. It offers innovative perspectives on the future of universities within the new and emerging research sub-field of the sociology of global higher education. The twenty-first century has witnessed wide-ranging structural and ideological transformations in higher education which have created both a sense of opportunity, as well as crisis and loss in the urgent debates around the legitimate roles of the university in the 21st century. The chapters represent a diverse and vibrant field, illustrating a sociological imagination and a dynamic engagement with the key challenges facing higher education, and confirming continuing inequalities through internationalisation. This book is comprised of a broad selection of articles originally published in the British Journal of Sociology of Education.

Increasing Graduate Student Retention and Degree Attainment

New Directions for Institutional Research, Number 80

Increasing Graduate Student Retention and Degree Attainment

Authoritative discussion of the problem of graduate drop-outs Increasing Graduate Student Retention and Degree Attainment: New Directions for Institutional Research, Number 80 provides forward-looking insight from experts in the field. Focused on the needs of both the student and the institution, this book explores the reasons why graduate students may leave the program, and examines the ways in which institutions may better accommodate their needs. Whether it is a question of post-graduate employment prospects, faculty support, funding, or any one of the myriad problems that may disrupt a graduate student's education, this book provides thought-provoking possible solutions.