Characteristics of Games

Characteristics of Games

Characteristics of Games offers a new way to understand games: by focusing on certain traits -- including number of players, rules, degrees of luck and skill needed, and reward/effort ratio -- and using these characteristics as basic points of comparison and analysis. These issues are often discussed by game players and designers but seldom written about in any formal way. This book fills that gap. By emphasizing these player-centric basic concepts, the book provides a framework for game analysis from the viewpoint of a game designer. The book shows what all genres of games -- board games, card games, computer games, and sports -- have to teach each other. Today's game designers may find solutions to design problems when they look at classic games that have evolved over years of playing. Characteristics of Games -- written by three of the most prominent game designers working today -- will serve as an essential reference for game designers and game players curious about the inner workings of games. It includes exercises (which can also serve as the basis for discussions) and examples chosen from a wide variety of games. There are occasional mathematical digressions, but these can be skipped with no loss of continuity. Appendixes offer supplementary material, including a brief survey of the two main branches of mathematical game theory and a descriptive listing of each game referred to in the text.

Artificial Intelligence and Games

Artificial Intelligence and Games

This is the first textbook dedicated to explaining how artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can be used in and for games. After introductory chapters that explain the background and key techniques in AI and games, the authors explain how to use AI to play games, to generate content for games and to model players. The book will be suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in games, artificial intelligence, design, human-computer interaction, and computational intelligence, and also for self-study by industrial game developers and practitioners. The authors have developed a website (http://www.gameaibook.org) that complements the material covered in the book with up-to-date exercises, lecture slides and reading.

Games: Purpose and Potential in Education

Games: Purpose and Potential in Education

The field of Games is rapidly expanding, prompting institutions throughout the world to create game development programs and courses focusing on educational games. As a result, games have also become a hot topic in the area of educational technology research. This increased interest is due to the technological advancement of digital games and the fact that a new, digital generation is emerging with a strong gaming background. Games: Purpose and Potential in Education focuses on the issues of incorporating games into education and instructional design. Ideas of identity development, gender diversity, motivation, and integrating instructional design within game development are addressed since each of these areas is important in the field of instructional design and can have a significant impact on learning. This volume brings together leading experts, researchers, and instructors in the field of gaming and explores current topics in gaming and simulations, available resources, and the future of the field.

Rules of Play

Game Design Fundamentals

Rules of Play

Meaningful play - Design - Systems - Interactivity - Defining games - The magic circle - Defining rules - Rules on three levels - The rules of digital games - Games as systems of uncertainty - Games as systems of information - Games as cybernetic systems - Games as systems of conflict - Games as the play of experience - Games as the play of meaning - Games as the play of simulation - Games as cultural rhetoric - Games as cultural resistance - Games as cultural environment.

Generalized Characteristics of First Order PDEs

Applications in Optimal Control and Differential Games

Generalized Characteristics of First Order PDEs

In some domains of mechanics, physics and control theory boundary value problems arise for nonlinear first order PDEs. A well-known classical result states a sufficiency condition for local existence and uniqueness of twice differentiable solution. This result is based on the method of characteristics (MC). Very often, and as a rule in control theory, the continuous nonsmooth (non-differentiable) functions have to be treated as a solutions to the PDE. At the points of smoothness such solutions satisfy the equation in classical sense. But if a function satisfies this condition only, with no requirements at the points of nonsmoothness, the PDE may have nonunique solutions. The uniqueness takes place if an appropriate matching principle for smooth solution branches defined in neighboring domains is applied or, in other words, the notion of generalized solution is considered. In each field an appropriate matching principle are used. In Optimal Control and Differential Games this principle is the optimality of the cost function. In physics and mechanics certain laws must be fulfilled for correct matching. A purely mathematical approach also can be used, when the generalized solution is introduced to obtain the existence and uniqueness of the solution, without being aimed to describe (to model) some particular physical phenomenon. Some formulations of the generalized solution may meet the modelling of a given phenomenon, the others may not.

Using Games and Simulations in the Classroom

A Practical Guide for Teachers

Using Games and Simulations in the Classroom

Games and simulations are an effective way of supporting the curriculum. This handbook demonstrates how to develop and use games and simulations in schools. It provides practical advice and guidance on how and when to use these as well as illustrative cases from nursery schools to secondary level.

Psychology, Pedagogy, and Assessment in Serious Games

Psychology, Pedagogy, and Assessment in Serious Games

"This book addresses issues the potential of games to support learning and change behaviour offering empirical evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of Serious Games in the key areas of psychology, pedagogy, and assessment"--

Lectures on the Theory of Games (AM-37)

Lectures on the Theory of Games (AM-37)

This book is a spectacular introduction to the modern mathematical discipline known as the Theory of Games. Harold Kuhn first presented these lectures at Princeton University in 1952. They succinctly convey the essence of the theory, in part through the prism of the most exciting developments at its frontiers half a century ago. Kuhn devotes considerable space to topics that, while not strictly the subject matter of game theory, are firmly bound to it. These are taken mainly from the geometry of convex sets and the theory of probability distributions. The book opens by addressing "matrix games," a name first introduced in these lectures as an abbreviation for two-person, zero-sum games in normal form with a finite number of pure strategies. It continues with a treatment of games in extensive form, using a model introduced by the author in 1950 that quickly supplanted von Neumann and Morgenstern's cumbersome approach. A final section deals with games that have an infinite number of pure strategies for the two players. Throughout, the theory is generously illustrated with examples, and exercises test the reader's understanding. A historical note caps off each chapter. For readers familiar with the calculus and with elementary matrix theory or vector analysis, this book offers an indispensable store of vital insights on a subject whose importance has only grown with the years.

Contributions to the Theory of Games

Contributions to the Theory of Games

A new group of contributions to the development of this theory by leading experts in the field. The contributors include L. D. Berkovitz, L. E. Dubins, H. Everett, W. H. Fleming, D. Gale, D. Gillette, S. Karlin, J. G. Kemeny, R. Restrepo, H. E. Scarf, M. Sion, G. L. Thompson, P. Wolfe, and others.