Children s Early Text Construction

Research on children's early writing development has suggested changing educational practices concerning text construction. First,the discovery ofyoungchildren's autonomous activity aboutnotational and writing systems doesnot mean that ...

Children s Early Text Construction

For decades, research on children's literacy has been dominated by questions of how children learn to read. Especially among Anglophone scholars, cognitive and psycholinguistic research on reading has been the only approach to studying written language education. Echoing this, debates on methods of teaching children to read have long dominated the educational scene. This book presents an alternative view. In recent years, writing has emerged as a central aspect of becoming literate. Research in cognitive psychology has shown that writing is a highly complex activity involving a degree of planning unknown in everyday conversational uses of language. At the same time, developmental studies have revealed that when young children are asked to "write," they show a surprisingly sophisticated understanding of the representational constraints of alphabetic writing systems. They show this understanding long before they can read conventional writing on their own. The rich structure of meanings involved in the word text provided the glue that brought together a group of scholars from several disciplines in an international workshop held in Rome. Reflecting the state of the field at the time, the majority of the workshop participants were scholars working in languages other than English, especially the romance languages. Their work mirrors a linguistic and psychological research tradition that Anglophone scholars knew little of until recently. This volume provides English-language readers with updated versions of the papers presented at the meeting. The topics discussed at the workshop are represented in the chapters as follows: * the relationship between acquisition of language and familiarity with written texts; * the reciprocal "permeability" between spoken and written language; * the initial phases of text construction by children; and * the educational conditions that facilitate written language acquisition and writing practice.

Children s Early Text Construction

Echoing this, debates on methods of teaching children to read have long dominated the educational scene. This book presents an alternative view. In recent years, writing has emerged as a central aspect of becoming literate.

Children s Early Text Construction

For decades, research on children's literacy has been dominated by questions of how children learn to read. Especially among Anglophone scholars, cognitive and psycholinguistic research on reading has been the only approach to studying written language education. Echoing this, debates on methods of teaching children to read have long dominated the educational scene. This book presents an alternative view. In recent years, writing has emerged as a central aspect of becoming literate. Research in cognitive psychology has shown that writing is a highly complex activity involving a degree of planning unknown in everyday conversational uses of language. At the same time, developmental studies have revealed that when young children are asked to "write," they show a surprisingly sophisticated understanding of the representational constraints of alphabetic writing systems. They show this understanding long before they can read conventional writing on their own. The rich structure of meanings involved in the word text provided the glue that brought together a group of scholars from several disciplines in an international workshop held in Rome. Reflecting the state of the field at the time, the majority of the workshop participants were scholars working in languages other than English, especially the romance languages. Their work mirrors a linguistic and psychological research tradition that Anglophone scholars knew little of until recently. This volume provides English-language readers with updated versions of the papers presented at the meeting. The topics discussed at the workshop are represented in the chapters as follows: * the relationship between acquisition of language and familiarity with written texts; * the reciprocal "permeability" between spoken and written language; * the initial phases of text construction by children; and * the educational conditions that facilitate written language acquisition and writing practice.

Early Childhood Education

text, the researcher, hearing what the child verbalizes, rewrites it in conventional writing. The textual awareness was shown in the ... In C. Pontecorvo, M. Orsolini, M. Bruge, and L. Resnik, eds., Children's early text construction.

Early Childhood Education


Handbook of Early Childhood Literacy

How children interpret the doubling of letters in writing', in C. Pontecorvo, M. Orsolini, B. Burge and L. Resnick (eds), Children's Early Text Construction. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. pp. 146–64. Formisano, M. (1996) 'Literacy in first ...

Handbook of Early Childhood Literacy

"This volume examines early literacy research on a global scale and puts social, cultural, and historical analyses in the front seat--without losing sight of individual and family-level matters in the process. It is comprehensive, ground-breaking, and provocative, and should help literacy researchers to think differently about the field." --Marjorie Faulstich Orellana, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University "No other publication that I am aware of brings together views from such diverse disciplines, contributing to a comprehensive statement about early childhood literacy. The Handbook not only reviews the current field of situated literacy but presents some important and exciting new research. It is a significant resource that promises to become a landmark text." --Eve Bearne, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education, U.K. "This handbook brings together an astonishing array of writers who explore contemporary political, cultural, and cognitive understandings of early childhood literacy. Literacy and literacy acquisition are broadly defined here to encompass not just traditional notions of reading and writing, but multimodalities, multiliteracies, and critical literacies. . . It is rich and comprehensive, an invaluable resource for scholars, educators, and students of early childhood literacy." --Elsa Auerbach, Professor of English, University of Massachusetts, Boston "This book is unique in its broad consideration of topics and its global focus . . . I particularly appreciate how the editors have situated current research in an historical context. They have also included development issues, pedagogy, research, and the newest areas of interest--critical literacy and popular culture." --Diane Barone, University of Nevada, Reno In recent years there has been a virtual revolution in early childhood studies, with a mass of books and papers seeking to re-examine and reposition childhood. At the same time an equally significant area has developed within literacy studies, reflecting a growing interest in the nature of literacy as a socially situated phenomenon. There is increased interest in literacy as a multimodal concept in which symbolic meaning is a central concept, rather than more conventional and narrower notions of literacy. The Handbook of Early Childhood Literacy is central in providing access to all these different perspectives. The Handbook offers a way through the vast diversity of publications on early childhood literacy by providing comprehensive and up-to-date reviews of research and thinking in early childhood literacy. The arrangement of chapters reflects a contemporary perspective on research into early childhood literacy. Major sections include: the global world of early childhood literacy; childhood literacy and family, community and culture; the development of literacy in early childhood; pedagogy and early childhood literacy and researching early childhood literacy. Contributions by leading authorities focus on literacy as a socially situated and global experience, one that is evolving in relation to changes in contemporary culture and technological innovation.

Functional Literacy

[The use of punctuation in the story writing of 2nd and 3rd grade children.] In: M. Orsolini & C. Pontecorvo (Eds.), La construzione del testo scritto nei bambini [Early text construction in children.] Firenze: La Nuova Italia, 233-257.

Functional Literacy

The purpose of the volume is to open up new perspectives in the study of literacy by bringing together current research findings from linguistics, psychology, sociology and anthropology. The book divides into five parts. The first part deals with theoretical questions related to the definition and the modeling of the construct of functional literacy. The second part goes into the notion of literacy development. Both societal and individual aspects of literacy development are taken into account. In the next two parts the actual achievement of literacy in various regions of the world is dealt with. In part 3 the focus is on attaining literacy in developing societies, and in part 4 on attaining literacy in industrialized societies. In the final part the question is raised how functional literacy can be promoted through education. Starting from a cross-cultural perspective the central issue is how standards of functional literacy can be established throughout the world.

History and the Construction of the Child in Early British Children s Literature

The death count begins almost immediately, long before the boys reach the island. in their first hours on The ... take from the text, a force unto itself, a force designed to make both the child within the text and the child reader ...

History and the Construction of the Child in Early British Children s Literature

How did the 'flat' characters of eighteenth-century children's literature become 'round' by the mid-nineteenth? While previous critics have pointed to literary Romanticism for an explanation, Jackie C. Horne argues that this shift can be better understood by looking to the discipline of history. Eighteenth-century humanism believed the purpose of history was to teach private and public virtue by creating idealized readers to emulate. Eighteenth-century children's literature, with its impossibly perfect protagonists (and its equally imperfect villains) echoes history's exemplar goals. Exemplar history, however, came under increasing pressure during the period, and the resulting changes in historiographical practice - an increased need for reader engagement and the widening of history's purview to include the morals, manners, and material lives of everyday people - find their mirror in changes in fiction for children. Horne situates hitherto neglected Robinsonades, historical novels, and fictionalized histories within the cultural, social, and political contexts of the period to trace the ways in which idealized characters gradually gave way to protagonists who fostered readers' sympathetic engagement. Horne's study will be of interest to specialists in children's literature, the history of education, and book history.

Sign Bilingualism

Iconicity in children's first written texts. In Iconicity in Language, ... Writing and written language in children's development. In Children's Early Text Construction, C. Pontecorvo, M. Orsolini, B. Burge & L.B. Resnick (eds.), 3–23.

Sign Bilingualism

This volume provides a unique cross-disciplinary perspective on the external ecological and internal psycholinguistic factors that determine sign bilingualism, its development and maintenance at the individual and societal levels. Multiple aspects concerning the dynamics of contact situations involving a signed and a spoken or a written language are covered in detail, i.e. the development of the languages in bilingual deaf children, cross-modal contact phenomena in the productions of child and adult signers, sign bilingual education concepts and practices in diverse social contexts, deaf educational discourse, sign language planning and interpretation. This state-of-the-art collection is enhanced by a final chapter providing a critical appraisal of the major issues emerging from the individual studies in the light of current assumptions in the broader field of contact linguistics. Given the interdependence of research, policy and practice, the insights gathered in the studies presented are not only of scientific interest, but also bear important implications concerning the perception, understanding and promotion of bilingualism in deaf individuals whose language acquisition and use have been ignored for a long time at the socio-political and scientific levels.

Translation of Thought to Written Text While Composing

Teaching Exceptional Children, 39, 22–27. ... Learning to spell: Variability, choice, and change in children's strategy use. ... In M. O. C. Pontecorvo, B. Burge, & L. B. Resnick (Eds.), Children's early text construction (pp. 165–175).

Translation of Thought to Written Text While Composing

Translation of cognitive representations into written language is one of the most important processes in writing. This volume provides a long-awaited updated overview of the field. The contributors discuss each of the commonly used research methods for studying translation; theorize about the nature of the cognitive and language representations and cognitive/linguistic transformation mechanisms involved in translation during writing; and make the case that translation is a higher-order executive function that is fundamental to the writing process. The book also reviews the application of research to practice -- that is, the translation of the research findings in education and the work-world for individuals who interact with others using written language to communicate ideas. This volume provides a rich resource for student, theorists, and empirical researchers in cognitive psychology, linguistics, and education; and teachers and clinicians who can use the research in their work.

How Children Learn to Write Words

Carmichael's manual of child psychology (3rd ed., Vol. 1, pp. ... In D. McGuinness, Why our children can't read and what we can do about it. new York, nY: free Press. ... Children's early text construction (pp. 345–357).

How Children Learn to Write Words

Writing allows people to convey information to others who are remote in time and space, vastly increasing the range over which people can cooperate and the amount they can learn. Mastering the writing system of one's language is crucial for success in a modern society. This book examines how children learn to write words. It provides a theoretical framework that integrates findings from a wide range of age groups--from children who are producing their first scribbles to experienced spellers who are writing complex words. To set the stage for these discussions, early chapters of the book consider the nature of writing systems and the nature of learning itself. The following chapters review various aspects of orthographic development, including the learning of symbol shapes and punctuation. Each chapter reviews research with learners of a variety of languages and writing systems, revealing underlying similarities. Discussions of how orthography is and should be taught are incorporated into each chapter, making the book of interest to educators as well as to psychologists, cognitive scientists, and linguists. This book is unique in the range of topics and languages that it covers and the degree to which it integrates linguistic insights about the nature of writing systems with discussions of how people learn to use these systems. It is written in a scholarly yet accessible manner, making it suited for a wide audience.

On Reading Books to Children

... Children's early text construction (pp. 321–344). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Wells, G. (1986). The meaning makers: Children learning language and using language to learn. Portsmouth, NH: Heineman. CHILDREN'S BOOKS Egan ...

On Reading Books to Children

On Reading Books to Children: Parents and Teachers brings together in one volume current research on adult book reading to children. The authors, drawn from around the world, are key researchers and eminent scholars from the fields of reading and literacy, child language, speech pathology, and psychology, representing multiple perspectives within these disciplines. Chapters on the effects and limitations of book sharing are integrated with chapters discussing promising programs on storybook research. The reality of reading to children is more complex than it appears on the surface. The authors discuss some effects of and suggestions for reading to children that have emerged from the research. The ideas set forth in this volume will stimulate new lines of research on the effects of storybook reading, as well as refinements of current methods, yielding findings that enrich our understanding of this important arena of literacy development.

Handbook of Reading Research

... Children's early text construction (pp. 25—46). Mahwah, N]; Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Sulzby, B., Branz,C. M., 8: Buhle, R. (1993). Repeated readings ofliterature and low socioeconomic Black kindergarten and first graders.

Handbook of Reading Research

In Volume III, as in Volumes I and II, the classic topics of reading are included--from vocabulary and comprehension to reading instruction in the classroom--and, in addition, each contributor was asked to include a brief history that chronicles the legacies within each of the volume's many topics. However, on the whole, Volume III is not about tradition. Rather, it explores the verges of reading research between the time Volume II was published in 1991 and the research conducted after this date. The editors identified two broad themes as representing the myriad of verges that have emerged since Volumes I and II were published: (1) broadening the definition of reading, and (2) broadening the reading research program. The particulars of these new themes and topics are addressed.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education

51–72). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Conte, M. P., Rampelli, L. P., & Volterra, V. (1996). Deaf children and the construction ofwritten texts. In C. Pontecorvo & M. Orsolini (Eds.), Children's early text construction (pp. 303–319).

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies  Language  and Education

Oxford Handbooks offer authoritative and up-to-date reviews of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned chapters from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates, as well as a foundation for future research. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The adage Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it is a powerful one for parents, teachers, and other professionals involved with or interested in deaf individuals or the Deaf community. Myths grown from ignorance have long dogged the field, and faulty assumptions and overgeneralizations have persisted despite contrary evidence. A study of the history of deaf education reveals patterns that have affected educational policy and legislation for deaf people around the world; these patterns are related to several themes critical to the chapters of this volume. One such theme is the importance of parental involvement in raising and educating deaf children. Another relates to how Deaf people have taken an increasingly greater role in influencing their own futures and places in society. In published histories, we see the longstanding conflicts through the centuries that pertain to sign language and spoken communication philosophies, as well as the contributions of the individuals who advocated alternative strategies for teaching deaf children. More recently, investigators have recognized the need for a diverse approach to language and language learning. Advances in technology, cognitive science, linguistics, and the social sciences have alternately led and followed changes in theory and practice, resulting in a changing landscape for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals and those connected to them. This second volume of the The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education (2003) picks up where that first landmark volume left off, describing those advances and offering readers the opportunity to understand the current status of research in the field while recognizing the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. In Volume 2, an international group of contributing experts provide state-of-the-art summaries intended for students, practitioners, and researchers. Not only does it describe where we are, it helps to chart courses for the future.

Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8

Child language leading to text construction, sentence construction and vocabulary development Janet Scull and Noella ... literate discourse, is critical to children's ability to create texts in the early years of schooling and beyond.

Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8

As the world comes to grips with what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century, Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8 provides practitioners with the skills and knowledge they need to support young children effectively as they learn to write. Interweaving theory and research with everyday practice, the book offers guidance on all aspects of writing, from creating multimodal texts and building children’s vocabulary, to providing support for children who find writing particularly challenging. With appropriate strategies to develop young children’s writing from an early age included throughout, the book discusses the role of oral language in early writing in detail and explores the key relationships between ‘drawing and talking’, ‘drawing and writing’ and ‘drawing, talking and writing’. Each chapter also features samples of writing and drawing to illustrate key points, as well as reflective questions to help the reader apply ideas in their own settings. Further topics covered include: progressions in children’s writing writing in the pre-school years developing authorial skills developing editorial skills teaching writing to EAL learners. Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8 is a unique resource that will help early childhood educators, early years school teachers, specialist practitioners working with very young children, and students enrolled in Early Childhood or Primary Studies courses to boost their confidence in teaching young learners as they become writers.

Writing Development

(1994) Iconicity in children's first written texts. In R. Simone (ed.) ... Children's early text construction. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA. ... Pontecorvo, C, Zucchermaglio, (1988) Modes of differentiation in children's writing construction.

Writing Development

This volume presents a selection of papers presented at a series of three workshops organized by the Network "Written Language and Literacy" as launched by the European Science Foundation. The main topics making up "Writing Development" are: (1) "Writing and literacy acquisition: Links between speech and writing," with contributions by David R. Olson, Claire Blanche-Benveniste, Emilia Ferreiro, Ruth Berman, Liliana Tolchinsky & Ana Teberosky; (2) "Writing and reading in time and culture," with contributions by Collette Sirat, Francoise Desbordes, Harmut Gunther, Peter Koch, & Jean Hebrard: (3) "Written language competence in monolingual and bilingual contexts," with contributions by Michel Fayol & Serge Mouchon, Georges Ludi, & Ludo Verhoeven; (4) "Writing systems, brain structures and languages: A neurolinguistic view," with contributions by Giuseppe Cossu, Heinz Wimmer & Uta Frith, & Brian Butterworth. The volume heads off with an extensive introduction "Studying writing and writing acquisition today: A multidisciplinary view."

Communication Language and Literacy in the Early Years Foundation Stage

Goodman, Y. (1986) 'Readers' and Writers' Talk About Language', in C. Pontecorvo, B. Burge and L. B. Resnic (eds), Children's Early Text Construction, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Goswami, U. and Bryant, ...

Communication  Language and Literacy in the Early Years Foundation Stage

The Practical Guidance in the Early Years Foundation Stage series will assist practitioners in the smooth and successful implementation of the Early Years Foundation Stage. Each book gives clear and detailed explanations of each aspect of Learning and Development and encourages readers to consider each area within its broadest context to expand and develop their own knowledge and good practice. Practical ideas and activities for all age groups are offered along with a wealth of expertise of how elements from the practice guidance can be implemented within all early years settings. The books include suggestions for the innovative use of everyday ressources, popular books and stories. Children's early communication needs careful nurturing and support. Practitioners will be both challenged and supported by this book which focuses on the skills needed for language and literacy and all aspects of children's interaction with others. The learning opportunities for children need to be relevant for their age group, realistic and challenging. This book gives readers clear explanations and practical ideas to help them establish firm foundations on which children can grow in confidence and become skilful communicators.

Handbook of Orthography and Literacy

The construction of expository text. First Language, 10, 217–230. Boscolo, P. (1991). Strategies of restructuring narrative and argumentative texts in elementary school children. In M. Carretero, M. Pope, R.J. Simons, ...

Handbook of Orthography and Literacy

Until about two decades ago, the study of writing systems and their relationship to literacy acquisition was sparse and generally modeled after studies of English language learners. This situation is now changing. As the worldwide demand for literacy continues to grow, researchers from different countries with different language backgrounds have begun examining the connection between their writing systems and literacy acquisition. This text, which derives from a NATO sponsored conference on orthography and literacy, brings together the research of 70 scholars from across the world--the largest assemblage of such experts to date. Their findings are grouped into three parts, as follows: Part I, Literacy Acquisition in Different Writing Systems, describes the relationship between orthography and literacy in twenty-five orthographic systems. This section serves as a handy reference source for understanding the orthographies of languages as diverse as Arabic, Chinese, English, Icelandic, Kannada, and Kishwahili. Part II, Literacy Acquisition From a Cross-Linguistic Perspective, makes direct comparisons of literacy acquisition in English and other orthographic systems. The overall conclusion that emerges from these eight chapters is that the depth of an orthographic system does influence literacy acquisition primarily by slowing down the acquisition of reading skills. Even so, studies show that dyslexic readers can be found across all orthographic systems whether shallow or deep, which shows that dyslexia also has internal cognitive and biological components. Part III, Literacy Acquisition: Instructional Perspectives, explores literacy acquisition from developmental and instructional perspectives and ends with a look into the future of literacy research. This Handbook is appropriate for scholars, researchers, and graduate students in such diverse fields as cognitive psychology, psycholinguistics, literacy education, English as a second language, and communication disorders.

Teaching and Learning in the Early Years

Early. Years. Young writers need: • to perceive themselves as writers; • an environment in which they are perceived as writers, ... In C. Pontecorvo, B. Burge and L. B. Resnic (Eds.), Children's Early Text Construction.

Teaching and Learning in the Early Years

This best-selling text book provides a broad-ranging and up-to-date review of thinking and best practice within nursery and infant education. Written around the basic truth that an effective early years curriculum must start with the children, their needs and their potential, the contributors to this classic text acknowledge that learning must have a strong element of fun, wonder and excitement. Fully revised and updated in light of recent changes to the Early Years curriculum, with brand new chapters on assessment, communication, writing, creativity and diversity, the contributors address a range of fundamental issues and principles, including: an analysis of research into how children learn; discussions of issues such as classroom organisation, curriculum management, and assessment; a detailed section on play and language; chapters covering individual curriculum areas, including new chapters on music and PSHE. Each chapter combines a review of important principles with practical and inspiring classroom examples throughout. It is essential reading for all Foundations Stage and KS1 trainee teachers, their tutors and mentors, and serving teachers working in the 3-7 age range who wish to reflect upon and develop their practice.

Languages of Learning

Cummins, J. (1991a) 'Interdependence of First- and Second-language Proficiency in Bilingual Children. ... In C. Pontecorvo, B. Orsolini, B. Burge and L.B. Resnick (eds) Children's Early Text Construction, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum ...

Languages of Learning

Study examining challenges educators face due to globalisation and new information technologies. Due to increasing multilingual environment new ways are needed to deploy information technology so that it can harness all communication modes effectively. Contains essays from educators and academics discussing the nature of education, technology and diversity. Contributors are lecturers in various Australian universities. Published in both paperback and downloadable PDF format. Editor is the Dean of the Faculty of Education at RMIT University Melbourne and has served on Ethnic Affairs Advisory Committee in Queensland.

Acquisition and Development of Hebrew

In spite of children's early sensitivity to linguistic features of written style and different genres, analysis of text construction abilities in older children demonstrates that command of overall organization of extended discourse ...

Acquisition and Development of Hebrew

The volume addresses developing knowledge and use of Hebrew from the dual perspective of typologically specific factors and of shared cross-linguistic trends, aimed at providing an overview of acquisition in a single language from infancy to adolescence while also shedding light on key issues in the field as a whole. Essentially non-partisan in approach, the collection includes distinct approaches to language and language acquisition (formal-universalist, pragmatic-usage based, cognitive-constructivist) and deals with a range of topics not often addressed within a single volume (phonological perception and production, inflectional and derivational morphology, simple-clause structure and complex syntax, early and later literacy, writing systems), with data deriving from varied research methodologies (interactive conversations and extended discourse, adult input and child output, longitudinal and cross-sectional corpora, structured elicitations). Each chapter provides background information on Hebrew-specific facets of the topic of concern, but typically avoids ethno-centricity by relating to more general issues in the domain. The book should thus prove interesting and instructive for linguists, psychologists, and educators, and for members of the child language research community both within and beyond the confines of Hebrew-language expertise.

Handbook of Early Literacy Research

Early book reading: How mothers deviate from printed text for young children. Reading Research and Instruction, 37, ... In C. Pontecorvo, M. Orsolini, B. Burge, & L. B. Resnick (Eds.), Early text construction in children (pp. 25–46).

Handbook of Early Literacy Research

Current research increasingly highlights the role of early literacy in young children's development--and facilitates the growth of practices and policies that promote success among diverse learners. The Handbook of Early Literacy Research presents cutting-edge knowledge on all aspects of literacy learning in the preschool years. Volume 1 covers such essential topics as major theories of early literacy; writing development; understanding learning disabilities, including early intervention approaches; cultural and socioeconomic contexts of literacy development; and tutoring programs and other special intervention efforts.