Chinatowns

Towns within Cities in Canada

Chinatowns

This book is a definitive history of Chinatowns in Canada. From instant Chinatowns in gold- and coal-mining communities to new Chinatowns which have sprung up in city neighbourhoods and suburbs since World War II, it portrays the changing landscapes and images of Chinatowns from the late nineteenth century to the present. It also includes a detailed case study of Victoria's Chinatown, the earliest such settlement in Canada.

Chinatowns around the World

Gilded Ghetto, Ethnopolis, and Cultural Diaspora

Chinatowns around the World

The authors of Chinatowns around the World: Gilded Ghetto, Ethnopolis, and Cultural Diaspora seek to expose the social reality of Chinatowns with empirical data while examining the changing nature and functions of Chinatowns in different countries around the world.

Locke and the Sacramento Delta Chinatowns

Locke and the Sacramento Delta Chinatowns

Chinese pioneers in the Sacramento River Delta were the vital factor in reclaiming land and made significant contributions to California's agricultural industry from farming to canning. Since the 1860s, Chinese were already settled in the delta and created Chinatowns in and between the two towns of Freeport in the north and Rio Vista in the south. One of the towns, Locke, was unique in that it was built by the Chinese and was inhabited almost exclusively by the Chinese during the first half of the 1900s. The town of Locke represents the last remaining legacy of the Chinese pioneers who settled in the delta.

Revolutionaries, Monarchists, and Chinatowns

Chinese Politics in the Americas and the 1911 Revolution

Revolutionaries, Monarchists, and Chinatowns

The relationship of overseas Chinese to the Chinese revolution of 1911 has always been viewed in light of their involvement with Sun Yat-sen. Of equal significance, however, was the growth and development in overseas communities of the radical reform party of K'ang Yu-wei and Liang Ch'ich'ao, pro-Sun revolutionaries, and other political groups greatly influenced the involvement of Chinese immigrants in the 1911 revolution and produced substantial changes in the overseas communities themselves. Chinese in the Americas, especially North America and Hawaii, provide a good illustration of these points but until now have received little attention. Revolutionaries, Monarchists, and Chinatowns provides a comprehensive and original treatment of this dimension of Asian American politics. L. Eve Armentrout Ma has judiciously analyzed the abundant documentation on the development and functioning of the reform and revolutionary parties, showing the interactions between the two parties and with pre-existing social organizations such as hui-kuan, surname associations, and Triad lodges. Particularly important is her use of the contemporary Chinese-language newspapers, a rich source of information on the period.

Chinatowns in a Transnational World

Myths and Realities of an Urban Phenomenon

Chinatowns in a Transnational World

This book explores the history, the reality, and the complex fantasy of American and European Chinatowns and traces the patterns of transnational travel and traffic between China, South East Asia, Europe, and the United States which informed the development of these urban sites. Despite obvious structural or architectural similarities and overlaps, Chinatowns differ markedly depending on their location. European versions of Chinatowns can certainly not be considered mere replications of the American model. Paying close attention to regional specificities and overarching similarities, Chinatowns thus discloses the important European backdrop to a phenomenon commonly associated with North America. It starts from the assumption that the historical and modern Chinatown needs to be seen as complicatedly involved in a web of cultural memory, public and private narratives, ideologies, and political imperatives. Most of the contributors to this volume have multidisciplinary and multilingual backgrounds and are familiar with several different instances of the Chinese diasporic experience. With its triangular approach to the developments between China and the urban Chinese diasporas of North America and Europe, Chinatowns reveals connections and interlinkages which have not been addressed before.

Chinatowns of New York City

Chinatowns of New York City

For a span of more than a century, New York's Chinese communities have grown uninterruptedly from three streets in lower Manhattan to five Chinatowns, over 100 street blocks, across the boroughs of Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. No other Chinese communities outside Asia come close to this magnitude.

China's Open Door Policy

The Quest for Foreign Technology and Capital : a Study of China's Special Trade

China's Open Door Policy

The Open Door has become an integral part of China's economicdevelopment strategy since the late 1970's, and, not surprisingly,it has aroused considerable interest in developed countries. This bookgives a sympathetic but critical survey of this policy, with particularattention to the problems that have prevented the Open Door from beingimplemented as rapidly as first intended.

The Two Chinatowns

The Two Chinatowns

Caught in the grip of ruthless Asian gangs, the Chinatowns of New York City and Toronto are the North American headquarters for a worldwide criminal network specializing in extortion, drugs, immigrant smuggling, and murder. Detective Cisco Sanchez personifies the city he protects. Brash and cocky, he's also one of the best investigators in an elite division of the NYPD. But when his fiancee is gunned down in a Toronto restaurant by elements of a feared Vietnamese gang known as Born To Kill, Cisco's next assignment is extremely dangerous--and extremely personal. Teamed with his partner Brian McKenna, Cisco has to battle departmental rivalries, vicious street killers, and heavyweight financiers as corrupt as they are connected to follow the investigation around the globe and all the way to the top of Hong Kong's organized crime world.

Chinese Older People

A Need for Social Inclusion in Two Communities

Chinese Older People

Chinese older people living in the UK suffer from a number of disadvantages compounded by exclusion from both their own community and the mainstream community. Not only do Chinese older people find it difficult to access social and public services, but their own community is also not strong enough to provide them with the necessary care and support. This dual exclusion undermines their quality of life. The report concludes with suggestions for good policy and practice for promoting Chinese older people's inclusion in both communities. Chinese Older People is for anyone working with or providing services to older people and excluded ethnic minority groups, as well as policy makers and researchers interested in older people or the dynamics of ethnic communities.