Christ the Heart of Creation

Christ the Heart of Creation

In this wide-ranging book, Rowan Williams argues that what we say about Jesus Christ is key to understanding what Christian belief says about creator and creation overall. Through detailed discussion of texts from the earliest centuries to the present day, we are shown some of the various and subtle ways in which Christians have discovered in their reflections on Christ the possibility of a deeply affirmative approach to creation, and a set of radical insights in ethics and politics as well. Throughout his life, Rowan Williams has been deeply influenced by thinkers of the Eastern Christian tradition as well as Catholic and Anglican writers. This book draws on insights from Eastern Christianity, from the Western Middle Ages and from Reformed thinkers, from Calvin to Bonhoeffer – as well as considering theological insights sparked by philosophers like Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein. Christ the Heart of Creation concerns fundamental issues for Christian belief and Williams tackles them head-on: he writes with pellucid clarity and shows his gift for putting across what are inevitably complex ideas to a wide audience.

C.S. Lewis—On the Christ of a Religious Economy, 3.1

I. Creation and Sub-Creation

C.S. Lewis—On the Christ of a Religious Economy, 3.1

C. S. Lewis--On the Christ of a Religious Economy I, Creation and Sub-Creation opens with Lewis on creation, the fall into original sin, and the human condition before God and how such an understanding permeated all his work, post-conversion. For Lewis, Christ, the second person of the Trinity, is the agent of creation and its redeemer. This leads into Lewis's representation through sub-creation: explaining salvation history and the purpose of the creation and the creature through story (The Chronicles of Narnia, The Space Trilogy, Screwtape, etc.), but also the question of multiple incarnations, and the encounters he pens between Aslan-Christ and creatures. What does this tell us about the human predicament and our state after the fall? This volume forms the first part of the third book in a series of studies on the theology of C. S. Lewis titled C. S. Lewis: Revelation and the Christ. The books are written for academics and students, but also, crucially, for those people, ordinary Christians, without a theology degree who enjoy and gain sustenance from reading Lewis's work.

An Ecological Vision of the World

Toward a Christian Ecological Theology for Our Age

An Ecological Vision of the World

This study is an endeavour on the basis of the Christian theological tradition to overcome the tendency of the human's arrogant domination and reckless exploitation of nature. The author presents an alternative vision of the world to the current, excessively dualistic and anthropocentric worldview. This alternative worldview is an ecological vision of the world, which is relational and inclusive. This ecological worldview is a Christian vision of the world, which is rooted in the triune God, out of love, and is present in creation out of love from beginning to end. It is further asserted that this ecological vision of the world can contribute to a spirituality of life and peace and to a Christian life committed to cosmic justice.

The Way of Jesus Christ

Christology in Messianic Dimensions

The Way of Jesus Christ

The Way of Jesus Christ discusses the following topics: 1. The symbol of the way embodies the aspect of process and brings out christology's alignment towards its goal. This symbol can comprehend Christ's way from his birth in the Spirit and his baptism in the Spirit to his self-surrender on Golgotha. It also makes it possible to understand the path of Christ as the way leading from his resurrection to his parousia-the way he takes in the Spirit to Israel, to the nations, and into the breadth and depth of the cosmos. 2. The symbol of the way makes us aware that every human christology is historically conditioned and limited. Every human christology is a 'christology of the way, ' not yet a 'christology of the home country, ' a christology of faith, not yet a christology of sight. So christology is no more than the beginning of eschatology; and eschatology, as the Christian faith understands it, is always the consummation of christology. 3. Finally, but not least important: every way is an invitation. A way is something to be followed. 'The way of Jesus Christ' is not merely a christological category. It is an ethical category too. Anyone who enters upon Christ's way will discover who Jesus really is; and anyone who really believes in Jesus and the Christ of God will follow him along the way he himself took. Christology and christopraxis find one another in the full and completed knowledge of Christ. This christology links dogmatics and ethics in closer detail than in the previous volumes.

Christ, Creation, and the Vision of God

Augustine’s Transformation of Early Christian Theophany Interpretation

Christ, Creation, and the Vision of God

Early Christians interpreted the biblical theophany narratives as manifestations of Christ, yet Augustine challenged and reconfigured this view. Developing over centuries into two major exegetical strands, the transformation of theophany interpretation reveals the critical and adaptive capacity of patristic exegesis.

The New Creation

Heart of the Church and Scripture

The New Creation

The New Creation is a resuscitation of the basic truth of Christ in our generation, as God never fails to inspire great work in every age to heal his people. It is a transformation from darkness to his marvelous lightinto the higher glory of the mystery of God whose will is to give us his kingdom. The mysteries contained therein is part of the greatest truth revealed by the eternal wisdom of God in our own time, for our completeness and a glorious covenant of life against the false teachings that has done so much harm to the mystical body of Christ. I am quite certain that heresy, indifference, schism, evil doctrines, and powers of this age cannot stop the spirituality and message of this wonderful bookfor the angels of constellations are at work.

Creation and Double Chaos

Science and Theology in Discussion

Creation and Double Chaos

Scientist and theologian Sjoerd Bonting offers a new overarching framework for thinking about issues in religion and science. He looks at the creation controversy itself, including biblical perspectives, tradtional doctrines, and the particular potential contribution of chaos theory. Finally, Bonting extends this perspective, a combination of chaos theory and chaos theology he calls "double-chaos," into a framework that addresses traditional questions about evil, divine agency, soteriology, the understanding of disease, possible extraterrestrial life, and the future.

Theology for the Community of God

Theology for the Community of God

This proven systematic theology represents the very best in evangelical theology. Stanley Grenz presents the traditional themes of Christian doctrine -- God, humankind, Christ, the Holy Spirit, the church, and the last things--all within an emphasis on God's central program for creation, namely, the establishment of community. Masterfully blending biblical, historical, and contemporary concerns, Grenz's respected work provides a coherent vision of the faith that is both intellectually satisfying and expressible in Christian living. Available for the first time in paperback.

Within the Love of God

Essays on the Doctrine of God in Honour of Paul S. Fiddes

Within the Love of God

The doctrine of God is central to theology for it determines the way in which other regions of Christian doctrine are articulated, yet work on this topic in its own right has been occluded recently by treatments of the Trinity or divine passibility. This collection of specially commissioned essays presents major treatments of key themes in the doctrine of God, motivated by but not restricted to the work of Professor Paul S. Fiddes to whom it is offered as a Festschrift. It includes invigorating discussions of the biblical and non-biblical sources for the doctrine of God, and the section on Metaphysics and the Doctrine of God" examines some of the most important conceptual questions arising in contemporary theological debate about the being and nature of God, and God's relations to the world. The final section of the book on "God and Humanity" will be highly relevant to scholars working in the fields of theological anthropology, moral and political theology, on inter-faithrelations, on theology and literature, or who are interested in the impact of contemporary science on the doctrine of God. The introduction relates the essays in the book to the work of Professor Fiddes and to wider debates in Christian doctrine. This volume brings together a team of internationally distinguished scholars from a wide range of theological, philosophical and religious perspectives, and they will stimulate fresh thinking and new debate about this most central of topics in Christian theology."

Laying Down Arms to Heal the Creation-Evolution Divide

Laying Down Arms to Heal the Creation-Evolution Divide

Battles over creation or evolution have been perpetuated for years by vocal Christians and scientists alike. But conflict has never been the only choice. Laying Down Arms to Heal the Creation-Evolution Divide presents a comprehensive, uplifting alternative that brings together an orthodox, biblical view of a sovereign Creator-God and the meaningful discoveries of modern evolutionary biology. Gary Fugle offers unique insights into this debate from his dual perspective as both an award-winning biology professor and a committed leader in conservative evangelical churches. In focusing on the stumbling blocks that surround creation and evolution debates, Fugle sensitively addresses the concerns of skeptical Christians and demonstrates how believers may celebrate evolution as a remarkable aspect of God's glory. He describes how the mainstream scientific community, as well as numerous Christians, may alter current approaches to eliminate conflicts. He explains conservative readings of early Genesis that respect both the inerrant words of Scripture and the evolutionary revelations in God's natural creation. This book is for individuals who sense that biblical Christian faith and evolution are compatible without compromising core convictions. If given good reasons to do so, are we willing to lay down our arms to affirm an encompassing vision for the future?