Christianity, Modernity and Culture

New Perspectives on New Zealand History

Christianity, Modernity and Culture

For much of the twentieth century, New Zealand historians, like most Western scholars, largely took it for granted that as modernity waxed religion would wane. Secularization--the fading into insignificance of religion--would distinguish the modern era from previous ages. Until the 1980s, only a handful of scholars around the world raised serious empirical and theoretical questions about a Grand Theory that had become central to the self-understanding of the social sciences and of the modern world. Heated debates since then, and the unmistakable resurgence of world religions, have raised fundamental questions about the empirical and theoretical adequacy of secularization theory, and especially about how far it applies outside Europe. This volume revisits New Zealand history when secularization is no longer taken for granted as the Only Big Story that illuminates the country's social and cultural history. Contributors explore how New Zealanders' diverse religious and spiritual traditions have shaped practical, everyday concerns in politics, racial and ethnic relations, science, the environment, family life, gender relations, and other domains.

Convicts: New Zealand's Hidden Criminal Past

Convicts: New Zealand's Hidden Criminal Past

'New Zealanders have long been proud of their ancestry, untainted by the convict stain. They should think again . . . Facinating.' -Sydney Morning Herald New Zealand's Pakeha origin as a bolt-hole for convicts escaping Australia, a place where former convicts joined whaling and sealing gangs, and where sea captains thumbed their noses at the law, has been quietly forgotten. It has become a hidden part of our past, buried under the convenient fiction that the Treaty of Waitangi is the sole pivot of New Zealand's colonial story. In Convicts: New Zealand's Hidden Criminal Past, noted historian Matthew Wright challenges that notion. Our early nineteenth-century Pakeha past is, at least in part, a story of convicts who had found their way past the edge of the law, an age of heroic tales of survival, scurrilous deeds, cannibalism and piracy. Matthew Wright is one of New Zealand's most published historians and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society of University College, London. 'Matthew Wright is one of our most prolific social historians, an assiduous researcher and an engaging writer.' -Weekend Press

The Cambridge History of Christianity: Volume 9, World Christianities C.1914-c.2000

The Cambridge History of Christianity: Volume 9, World Christianities C.1914-c.2000

A comprehensive history of Christianity in the century when it truly became a global religion.

Encyclopedia of Christianity in the Global South

Encyclopedia of Christianity in the Global South

The rapid growth of Christianity in the global south is not just a demographic shift—it is transforming the faith itself. The Encyclopedia of Christianity in the Global South traces both the history and the contemporary themes of Christianity in more than 150 countries and regions. It includes maps, images, and a detailed timeline of key events.

A Show of Justice

Racial Amalgamation in Nineteenth Century New Zealand

A Show of Justice

First published in 1974, A Show of Justice remains the essential and definitive text on official policies towards the Maori people in the nineteenth century. Professor Ward shows how an understanding of the past explains why Maori today, formally equal under the law, continue having to demand rights assured under the Treaty of Waitangi and why major issues have yet to be recognised and addressed. A Show of Justice also has a glossary of Maori terms, a full index and notes.

Maori Origins and Migrations

The Genesis of Some Pakeha Myths and Legends

Maori Origins and Migrations

Since Europeans first set foot in New Zealand they have speculated about where the Maori people came from, how they made their way to New Zealand and how they lived when they arrived here. Theories have abounded: some of them have hardened into accepted truth. The result has been an accumulation of Pakeha myths about Maori origins. The process of this mythmaking is the subject of Sorrenson's book: 'It is not an attempt to find an original or even a Pacific homeland for the Maori. I leave that task to the many others who are happily engaged on it.' But as a study of the development of ideas, this book is both fascinating and salutary.

The Treaty of Waitangi

How New Zealand Became a British Colony

The Treaty of Waitangi

This 1914 work, reissued in its second edition (1933), examines how New Zealand joined the British Empire in 1840.