Christian Women and Modern China

Christian Women and Modern China explores how women have made history throughout the development of Chinese Protestantism.

Christian Women and Modern China

Christian Women and Modern China explores how women have made history throughout the development of Chinese Protestantism. Studying their lived experiences facilitates a nuanced understanding about the interplays of Christianity, gender, power and modern Chinese history.

People Communities and the Catholic Church in China

This book explores the Chinese Catholic Church as a whole as well as focusing on particular aspects of its activities, including diplomacy, politics, leadership, pilgrimage, youths, and non-Chinese Catholics in China.

People  Communities  and the Catholic Church in China

This book explores the Chinese Catholic Church as a whole as well as focusing on particular aspects of its activities, including diplomacy, politics, leadership, pilgrimage, youths, and non-Chinese Catholics in China. It discusses Sino-Vatican relations and the rationale behind the decisions taken by Pope Francis with regard to the appointment of bishops in China. The book also examines important changes and personalities in the Chinese Church, the Catholic organizations, and the Catholic communities in the Church, offering a key read for researchers and graduate students studying the Chinese Catholic Church, the Church in Asia, and religion in contemporary China.

Christianity in China

This pathbreaking volume will force a reassessment of many common assumptions about the relationship between Christianity and modern China.

Christianity in China

This pathbreaking volume will force a reassessment of many common assumptions about the relationship between Christianity and modern China. The overall thrust of the twenty essays is that despite the conflicts and tension that often have characterized relations between Christianity and China, in fact Christianity has been, for the past two centuries or more, putting down roots within Chinese society, and it is still in the process of doing so. Thus Christianity is here interpreted not just as a Western religion that imposed itself on China, but one that was becoming a Chinese religion, as Buddhism did centuries ago. Eschewing the usual focus on foreign missionaries, as is customary, this research effort is China-centered, drawing on Chinese sources, including government and organizational documents, private papers, and interviews. The essays are organized into four major sections: Christianity’s role in Qing society, including local conflicts (6 essays); ethnicity (3 essays); women (5 essays); and indigenization of the Christian effort (6 essays). The editor has provided sectional introductions to highlight the major themes in each section, as well as a general Introduction.

Christianity in Modern China

A contribution to modern church history , ET of 7th German ed . ... Philip L. Wickeri , Seeking the common ground : Protestant Christianity , the Three - Self Movement , and China's United Front ( Orbis , 1988 ) .

Christianity in Modern China

This monograph studies a significant episode in Chinese Christianity. Focusing on the origins of Protestantism in South Fujian, it investigates the evolution of the churches which pioneered in indigenization and ecclesiastical union in China during the 19th century.

China s Urban Christians

The purpose of this book is to explore how Christians in China perceive the challenges posed by their new urban context and to examine their proposed means of responding to these challenges.

China s Urban Christians

China's Urban Christians: A Light That Cannot Be Hidden looks at how massive urbanization is redrawing not only the geographic and social landscape of China, but in the process is transforming China's growing church as well. The purpose of this book is to explore how Christians in China perceive the challenges posed by their new urban context and to examine their proposed means of responding to these challenges. Although not primarily political in nature, these challenges nonetheless illustrate the complex interplay between China's Christian community and the Chinese party-state as it comes to terms with the continued growth and increasing prominence of Christianity in modern China.

Christianity in Contemporary China

This book offers a major contribution to the field and provides a timely, wide-ranging assessment of Christianity in Contemporary China.

Christianity in Contemporary China

Christianity is one of the fastest growing religions in China. Despite its long history in China and its significant indigenization or intertwinement with Chinese society and culture, Christianity continues to generate suspicion among political elites and intense debates among broader communities within China. This unique book applies socio-cultural methods in the study of contemporary Christianity. Through a wide range of empirical analyses of the complex and highly diverse experience of Christianity in contemporary China, it examines the fraught processes by which various forms and practices of Christianity interact with the Chinese social, political and cultural spheres. Contributions by top scholars in the field are structured in the following sections: Enchantment, Nation and History, Civil Society, and Negotiating Boundaries. This book offers a major contribution to the field and provides a timely, wide-ranging assessment of Christianity in Contemporary China.

The Church as Safe Haven

This book reconstructs the narratives of ordinary Christians, and places everyday faith experience at the center.Contributors are: Christie Chui-Shan Chow, Lydia Gerber, Melissa Inouye, Diana Junio, David Jong Hyuk Kang, Lars Peter Laamann, ...

The Church as Safe Haven

The Church as Safe Haven conceptualizes the rise of Chinese Christianity as a new civilizational paradigm that encouraged individuals and communities to construct a sacred order for empowerment in modern China. Once Christianity enrooted itself in Chinese society as an indigenous religion, local congregations acquired much autonomy which enabled new religious institutions to take charge of community governance. Our contributors draw on newly-released archival sources, as well as on fieldwork observations investigating what Christianity meant to Chinese believers, how native actors built their churches and faith-based associations within the pre-existing social networks, and how they appropriated Christian resources in response to the fast-changing world. This book reconstructs the narratives of ordinary Christians, and places everyday faith experience at the center. Contributors are: Christie Chui-Shan Chow, Lydia Gerber, Melissa Inouye, Diana Junio, David Jong Hyuk Kang, Lars Peter Laamann, Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, George Kam Wah Mak, John R. Stanley, R. G. Tiedemann, Man-Shun Yeung.

China s Christianity

In China’s Christianity: From Missionary to Indigenous Church, Anthony E. Clark has compiled a group of original research contributions from scholars who confront what it means to be an “indigenous” Chinese Church.

China s Christianity

In China’s Christianity: From Missionary to Indigenous Church, Anthony E. Clark has compiled a group of original research contributions from scholars who confront what it means to be an “indigenous” Chinese Church.

Sinicizing Christianity

Sinicizing Christianity investigates the ways in which Chinese people contextualized Christianity for local use.

Sinicizing Christianity

Sinicizing Christianity investigates the ways in which Chinese people contextualized Christianity for local use. It contributes to the larger debate on sinicization and offers insight on the transition from Christianity in China to Chinese Christianity.

Salvation and Modernity

"Salvation and Modernity presents an interpretation of the phenomenon of intellectual Christians in contemporary Chinese society, with special focus paid to Liu Xiaofeng, by exploring the main issues of faith, salvation, and the quest for a ...

Salvation and Modernity

"Salvation and Modernity presents an interpretation of the phenomenon of intellectual Christians in contemporary Chinese society, with special focus paid to Liu Xiaofeng, by exploring the main issues of faith, salvation, and the quest for a modern China. Author Fredrik Fallman investigates similar developments in earlier centuries by linking past and present forms of cultural Christian phenomenon and the beliefs and ideas of Liu Xiaofeng and other scholars. Their focus on Christianity implies a criticism of traditional Chinese value systems, in particular Confucianism and Daoism. The introduction of Christian theology and values into Chinese academia is a way of creating greater understanding for Western culture. Many cultural Christians argue that this advanced understanding is a prerequisite for establishing a modern China. Issues of personal faith and identity are also central in respect to modernity as well as to individual and national salvation." "Post-Mao China is seeking a new foundation for values, and cultural Christians have a definite role to play. Since the choice of Christianity is an expression of individuality, freedom, and criticism of political structures, cultural Christians will ultimately help in laying foundations for a theology in Chinese relations between the intellectuals and the Church. The impact and importance of cultural Christians is becoming more visible now than ever before."--BOOK JACKET.

China s Catholics in an Era of Transformation

This book features a collection of essays on China’s modern Catholic Church by a scholar of China-West intellectual and religious exchange.

China   s Catholics in an Era of Transformation

This book features a collection of essays on China’s modern Catholic Church by a scholar of China-West intellectual and religious exchange. The essays and reflections were mostly written in China while the author was traveling by train, or staying in villages or large cities near to Roman Catholic cathedrals or other important historical sites during research trips to the country. It is clear that Clark’s understanding of Catholicism in China evolved from the first entry to the final ones in 2019. The essays included in this compendium were written in disparate contexts and in response to different events. As such, there is no obvious theme or order to the content. However, despite this, the book provides valuable insights for readers wishing to gain a better understanding of the complex topography of Catholic history in China, the contours of which have undergone stark transformations with each dynastic, political, and ecclesial transition. The information presented serves to highlight and explain the lives of Catholic people and the events that have punctuated one of the most significant dimensions of China’s long history of friendship, conflict and exchange with the West.

A Chinese Jesuit Catechism

This book is the first scholarly study of the famous Jesuit Chinese children’s primer, the Four Character Classic, written by Giulio Aleni (1582–1649) while living in Fujian, China.

A Chinese Jesuit Catechism

This book is the first scholarly study of the famous Jesuit Chinese children’s primer, the Four Character Classic, written by Giulio Aleni (1582–1649) while living in Fujian, China. This book also includes masterful translations of both Wang Yinglin’s (1551–1602) hallowed Confucian Three Character Classic and Aleni’s Chinese catechism that was published during the Qing (1644–1911). Clark’s careful reading of the Four Character Classic provides new insights into an area of the Jesuit mission in early modern China that has so far been given little attention, the education of children. This book underscores how Aleni’s published work functions as a good example of the Jesuit use of normative Chinese print culture to serve the catechetical exigencies of the Catholic mission in East Asia, particularly his meticulous imitation of Confucian children’s primers to promote decidedly Christian content.

The Catholic Church in Taiwan

This book provides a ground breaking interdisciplinary study of the Catholic Church in Taiwan, focusing on the post 1949 Civil War in China through to the present day, and discusses the role played by the Catholic Church in contemporary ...

The Catholic Church in Taiwan

This book provides a ground breaking interdisciplinary study of the Catholic Church in Taiwan, focusing on the post 1949 Civil War in China through to the present day, and discusses the role played by the Catholic Church in contemporary Taiwanese society. It considers the situation of the Catholic church of Taiwan during the Japanese Occupation, Taiwan-Vatican Relations from 1949 onwards and triangular Relations among the Vatican, Taiwan and China during Tsai Ing-wen’s Administration. Written from a wide range of perspectives, from history and international relations to literature, philosophy, and education, this volume offers an important perspective on the birth and development of the Catholic Church in Taiwan, contributing a key work to religious studies in the Greater China Region.

Overseas Chinese Christian Entrepreneurs in Modern China

Many outsiders have assumed that religions, particularly Christianity with its “foreign” background, were basically extinguished from China (Hunter and Chan 1993). The religious change, however “unintended” it might be, would not have ...

Overseas Chinese Christian Entrepreneurs in Modern China

Inspired by Max Weber’s thesis on the Protestant ethic, ‘Overseas Chinese Christian Entrepreneurs in Modern China’ sets out to understand the role and influence of Christianity on Overseas Chinese businesspeople working in contemporary China. Through its in-depth interviews and participant observations (involving 60 Overseas Chinese entrepreneurs from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Southeast Asia and the United States), the text discusses how Christianity has come to fulfill an increasingly visible and dynamic function in the country, most notably as a new source of business morality.

China and the True Jesus

In this history ofthe True Jesus Church, Melissa Wei-Tsing Inouye links together key themes from modern Chinese social history to tell the story of how members of the True Jesus Church in China over the past century have sought to muster ...

China and the True Jesus

The True Jesus Church was China's first major native Christian denomination and one of the earliest expressions of the charismatic and Pentecostal tradition that now dominates Chinese Christianity. Founded in 1917, after a silk merchant had a vision of Jesus, the Church was characterized by dramatic healings, exorcisms, tongues-speaking, and a call for a return to authentic Christianity that challenged the Western missionary establishment in China. In this history of the True Jesus Church, Melissa Wei-Tsing Inouye links together key themes from modern Chinese social history to tell the story of how members of the True Jesus Church in China over the past century have sought to muster divine and human resources to transform their world.

Making Religion Making the State

With chapters written by experts on Buddhism, Protestantism, Catholicism, Daoism, Islam, and more, this volume will appeal across the social sciences and humanities to those interested in politics, religion, and modernity in China.

Making Religion  Making the State

Making Religion, Making the State combines cutting-edge perspectives on religion with rich empirical data to offer a challenging new argument about the politics of religion in modern China. The volume goes beyond extant portrayals of the opposition of state and religion to emphasize their mutual constitution. It examines how the modern category of "religion" is enacted and implemented in specific locales and contexts by a variety of actors from the late nineteenth century until the present. With chapters written by experts on Buddhism, Protestantism, Catholicism, Daoism, Islam, and more, this volume will appeal across the social sciences and humanities to those interested in politics, religion, and modernity in China.

Now Then

Now   Then


The Chinese Sisters of the Precious Blood and the Evolution of the Catholic Church

This book traces the origins of the Chinese Sisters of the Precious Blood in Hong Kong and their history up to the early 1970s, and contributes to the neglected area of Chinese Catholic women in the history of the Chinese Catholic Church.

The Chinese Sisters of the Precious Blood and the Evolution of the Catholic Church

This book traces the origins of the Chinese Sisters of the Precious Blood in Hong Kong and their history up to the early 1970s, and contributes to the neglected area of Chinese Catholic women in the history of the Chinese Catholic Church. It studies the growth of an indigenous community of Chinese sisters, who acquired a formal status in the local and universal Catholic Church, and the challenge of identifying Chinese Catholic women in studies dealing with the Chinese Church in the first half of the twentieth century, as these women remained "faceless" and "nameless" in contrast to their Catholic male counterparts of the period. Emphasizing the intertwining histories of the Hong Kong Church, the churches in China, and the Roman Catholic Church, it demonstrates how the history of the Precious Blood Congregation throws light on the formation and development of indigenous groups of sisters in contemporary China.

Christianity and the Transformation of Physical Education and Sport in China

This book examines the transformation of Chinese attitudes toward PE and sport, drawing on the concepts of cultural imperialism and nationalism to understand how an imported Western activity became a key aspect of modernization for the ...

Christianity and the Transformation of Physical Education and Sport in China

Despite the popularity of sport in contemporary China, the practice of physical education is not indigenous to its culture. Strenuous physical activity was traditionally linked to low class and status in the pre-modern Chinese society. The concept of modern PE was introduced to China by Western Christian missionaries and directors of the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA). It then grew from a tool for Christian evangelism to a strategic instrument in Chinese nation-building. This book examines the transformation of Chinese attitudes toward PE and sport, drawing on the concepts of cultural imperialism and nationalism to understand how an imported Western activity became a key aspect of modernization for the Chinese state. More specifically, it looks at the relationship between Christianity and the rise of Chinese nationalism between 1840 and 1937. Combining historical insight with original research, this book sheds new light on the evolution of PE and sport in modern China. It is fascinating reading for all those with an interest in sports history, Chinese culture and society, Christianity, physical education or the sociology of sport.