Citizenship in a Connected Canada

This is a foundational resource for policy makers, students, and researchers interested in understanding citizenship in a digital context in Canada. Published in English.

Citizenship in a Connected Canada

This interdisciplinary edited collection brings together scholars, activists, and policy makers to build consensus around what a connected society means for Canada. The collection offers insight on the state of citizenship in a digital context in Canada and proposes a research and policy agenda for the way forward. Part I examines the current landscape of digital civic participation and highlights some of the missing voices required to ensure an inclusive digital society. Part II explores the relationship between citizens and their political and democratic institutions, from government service delivery to academic and citizen engagement in policy making. Part III addresses key legal frameworks that need to be discussed and redesigned to allow for the building and strengthening of an inclusive society and democratic institutions. This is a foundational resource for policy makers, students, and researchers interested in understanding citizenship in a digital context in Canada. Published in English.

Citizenship in a Connected Canada

What does it mean to be connected in Canada ? What are the implications of this setting for citizens and policy making ? Scholars, activists, policy makers examine what a connected society means for Canada.

Citizenship in a Connected Canada

This interdisciplinary edited collection brings together scholars, activists, and policy makers to build consensus around what a connected society means for Canada. The collection offers insight on the state of citizenship in a digital context in Canada and proposes a research and policy agenda for the way forward. Part I examines the current landscape of digital civic participation and highlights some of the missing voices required to ensure an inclusive digital society. Part II explores the relationship between citizens and their political and democratic institutions, from government service delivery to academic and citizen engagement in policy making. Part III addresses key legal frameworks that need to be discussed and redesigned to allow for the building and strengthening of an inclusive society and democratic institutions. This is a foundational resource for policy makers, students, and researchers interested in understanding citizenship in a digital context in Canada. Published in English.

Producing and Negotiating Non citizenship

The contributors to this volume present theoretically informed empirical studies of the regulatory, institutional, discursive, and practical terms under which precarious-status non-citizens _ those without permanent residence _ enter and ...

Producing and Negotiating Non citizenship

Most examinations of non-citizens in Canada focus on immigrants, people who are citizens-in-waiting, or specific categories of temporary, vulnerable workers. In contrast, Producing and Negotiating Non-Citizenship considers a range of people whose pathway to citizenship is uncertain or non-existent. This includes migrant workers, students, refugee claimants, and people with expired permits, all of whom have limited formal rights to employment, housing, education, and health services. The contributors to this volume present theoretically informed empirical studies of the regulatory, institutional, discursive, and practical terms under which precarious-status non-citizens - those without permanent residence - enter and remain in Canada. They consider the historical and contemporary production of non-citizen precarious status and migrant illegality in Canada, as well as everyday experiences of precarious status among various social groups including youth, denied refugee claimants, and agricultural workers. This timely volume contributes to conceptualizing multiple forms of precarious status non-citizenship as connected through policy and the practices of migrants and the institutional actors they encounter.

Narrating Citizenship and Belonging in Anglophone Canadian Literature

As such, it marks a difference that is linked to a history of denial of citizenship in both of its aspects, formal membership and affective belonging. The construction of difference in this scene is connected to the historical exclusion ...

Narrating Citizenship and Belonging in Anglophone Canadian Literature

This book examines how concepts of citizenship have been negotiated in Anglophone Canadian literature since the 1970s. Katja Sarkowsky argues that literary texts conceptualize citizenship as political “co-actorship” and as cultural “co-authorship” (Boele van Hensbroek), using citizenship as a metaphor of ambivalent affiliations within and beyond Canada. In its exploration of urban, indigenous, environmental, and diasporic citizenship as well as of citizenship’s growing entanglement with questions of human rights, Canadian literature reflects and feeds into the term’s conceptual diversification. Exploring the works of Guillermo Verdecchia, Joy Kogawa, Jeannette Armstrong, Maria Campbell, Cheryl Foggo, Fred Wah, Michael Ondaatje, and Dionne Brand, this text investigates how citizenship functions to denote emplaced practices of participation in multiple collectives that are not restricted to the framework of the nation-state.

Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies

Specifically, since citizenship (re)emerged as part of a wider theoretical debate in the 1980s, Canadian scholars have ... citizenship may be seen to connect to Canada's foundation as a settlercolony, but it also relates to changes in ...

Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies

Citizenship studies is at a crucial moment of globalizing as a field. What used to be mainly a European, North American, and Australian field has now expanded to major contributions featuring scholarship from Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The Routledge Handbook of Global Citizenship Studies takes into account this globalizing moment. At the same time, it considers how the global perspective exposes the strains and discords in the concept of ‘citizenship’ as it is understood today. With over fifty contributions from international, interdisciplinary experts, the Handbook features state-of-the-art analyses of the practices and enactments of citizenship across broad continental regions (Africas, Americas, Asias and Europes) as well as deterritorialized forms of citizenship (Diasporicity and Indigeneity). Through these analyses, the Handbook provides a deeper understanding of citizenship in both empirical and theoretical terms. This volume sets a new agenda for scholarly investigations of citizenship. Its wide-ranging contributions and clear, accessible style make it essential reading for students and scholars working on citizenship issues across the humanities and social sciences.

Research in Global Citizenship Education

Although there is an extensive body of literature on citizenship education within national contexts and a growing literature on global education, this volume offers research on the work educators are doing across multiple countries to bring ...

Research in Global Citizenship Education

Globalization is changing what citizens need to know and be able to do by interrupting the assumption that the actions of citizens only take place within national borders. If our neighborhoods and nations are affecting and being affected by the world, then our political consciousness must be worldminded. The outcomes of globalization have led educators to rethink what students need to learn and be able to do as citizens in a globally connected world. This volume focuses on research that examines how K-12 teachers and students are currently addressing the challenge of becoming citizens in a globally interconnected world. Although there is an extensive body of literature on citizenship education within national contexts and a growing literature on global education, this volume offers research on the work educators are doing across multiple countries to bring the two fields together to develop global citizens.

Legislative Proposals Regarding the VA s Health Care System

... to address the problem with service - connected Vietnam veterans who are Canadian citizens living in Canada at a ... This change will remove the U.S. citizenship requirement for care abroad and will provide equity between all U.S. ...

Legislative Proposals Regarding the VA s Health Care System


Canada

Canadian Confederation in 1867, the Second World War in particular gave rise to a desire amongst Canadians to have their country ... On 1 January 1947, Canadian citizenship was conferred on most British subjects connected with Canada.

Canada


Connected Accountabilities Environmental Justice and Global Citizenship

These chapters are all based on earlier versions presented and discussed at the Ecological Justice and Global citizenship conference in Mansfield College, Oxford in 2008.

Connected Accountabilities  Environmental Justice and Global Citizenship

These chapters are all based on earlier versions presented and discussed at the Ecological Justice and Global citizenship conference in Mansfield College, Oxford in 2008. They provide an indication of the breadth of research and debate on environmental issues and provide a number of interesting perspectives.

Identity and Belonging

And, until 1976, a person regarded as a Canadian citizen was also a British subject owing allegiance to the English Crown. The concept of Canadian citizenship has also been inextricably connected to Canadian immigration policies, ...

Identity and Belonging

Canadian society is rapidly evolving. By 2017, persons belonging to a visible minority group will comprise 20 percent of the population. In Canada's major cities, the proportion of persons classified as visible minority is expected to exceed 50 percent. Canada is a country that is not very sure of its own identity. Many of our citizens do not know where they fit in the national fabric. As ethno-racial diversity increases, so will our uncertainty of our identity and role in the development of our nation. While Canada has always been culturally diverse, the continuing ethno-racial diversification will exercise a profound influence on Canadian culture, as well as on Canadian political and social institutions. As the ethno-racial composition becomes more complex, critical understandings of race, ethnicity, identity, and belonging are increasingly important goals for social justice, fairness, and inclusion. Provocative and ground-breaking, Identity and Belonging addresses these concerns, poses some essential questions about the nature of race and ethnicity, how they differ from one another, and how they might differ from other markers of identity, such as class, gender, or nationality.

Educating Citizens

A Democratic Socialist Agenda for Canadian Education Ken Osborne. Chapter 1 Educating Citizens Citizenship and the Schools Education and citizenship have long been connected in Canada . From their very beginnings schools were intended ...

Educating Citizens

The Canadian left has over the years paid remarkably little attention to the actual content of education. Apart from occasional bursts of concern about militarism, sexism, racism, or anti-labour bias, the school curriculum has gone largely unquestioned. Socialist values such as cooperation, participation, personal autonomy, and a sense of community do not appear out of thin air. They have to be acquired. Conservatives and liberals have long realized this and have shaped the schools accordingly, so that the capitalist ethic of competitive individualism is now strongly entrenched and is learned early in life. If the vision of cooperative commonwealth is to become a reality, then education will have an important role to play. This book is an attempt to outline what this role might be. Educating Citizens outlines a working class curriculum designed to prepare students for participation in a socialist democracy. An Our Schools/Our Selves book.

Citizenship and Participation in the Information Age

Overall, two-fifths of homes own a computer and about one-quarter are connected to the Internet, although the richest twenty percent of Canadian families are nearly five times as likely to have a computer and an Internet connection from ...

Citizenship and Participation in the Information Age

This book reflects each contributor's vision of the future, visions that range from the enthusiastic and hopeful to the pessimistic and fearful.

The Canadian Encyclopedia

Lee Paikin Citizenship The Citizenship Act , which is the current nationality legislation in force in Canada ... major urban centres . sion and immediately preceding the date of appli- Colonial towns , primarily connected and cation .

The Canadian Encyclopedia

This edition of "The Canadian Encyclopedia is the largest, most comprehensive book ever published in Canada for the general reader. It is COMPLETE: every aspect of Canada, from its rock formations to its rock bands, is represented here. It is UNABRIDGED: all of the information in the four red volumes of the famous 1988 edition is contained here in this single volume. It has been EXPANDED: since 1988 teams of researchers have been diligently fleshing out old entries and recording new ones; as a result, the text from 1988 has grown by 50% to over 4,000,000 words. It has been UPDATED: the researchers and contributors worked hard to make the information as current as possible. Other words apply to this extraordinary work of scholarship: AUTHORITATIVE, RELIABLE and READABLE. Every entry is compiled by an expert. Equally important, every entry is written for a Canadian reader, from the Canadian point of view. The finished work - many years in the making, and the equivalent of forty average-sized books - is an extraordinary storehouse of information about our country. This book deserves pride of place on the bookshelf in every Canadian Home. It is no accident that the cover of this book is based on the Canadian flag. For the proud truth is that this volume represents a great national achievement. From its formal inception in 1979, this encyclopedia has always represented a vote of faith in Canada; in Canada as a separate place whose natural worlds and whose peoples and their achievements deserve to be recorded and celebrated. At the start of a new century and a new millennium, in an increasingly borderless corporate world that seems ever more hostile to nationaldistinctions and aspirations, this "Canadian Encyclopedia is offered in a spirit of defiance and of faith in our future. The statistics behind this volume are staggering. The opening sixty pages list the 250 Consultants, the roughly 4,000 Contributors (all experts in the field they describe) and the scores of researchers, editors, typesetters, proofreaders and others who contributed their skills to this massive project. The 2,640 pages incorporate over 10,000 articles and over 4,000,000 words, making it the largest - some might say the greatest - Canadian book ever published. There are, of course, many special features. These include a map of Canada, a special page comparing the key statistics of the 23 major Canadian cities, maps of our cities, a variety of tables and photographs, and finely detailed illustrations of our wildlife, not to mention the colourful, informative endpapers. But above all the book is "encyclopedic" - which the "Canadian Oxford Dictionary describes as "embracing all branches of learning." This means that (with rare exceptions) there is satisfaction for the reader who seeks information on any Canadian subject. From the first entry "A mari usque ad mare - "from sea to sea" (which is Canada's motto, and a good description of this volume's range) to the "Zouaves (who mustered in Quebec to fight for the beleaguered Papacy) there is the required summary of information, clearly and accurately presented. For the browser the constant variety of entries and the lure of regular cross-references will provide hours of fasination. The word "encyclopedia" derives from Greek expressions alluding to a grand "circle of knowledge." Our knowledge has expandedimmeasurably since the time that one mnd could encompass all that was known.Yet now Canada's finest scientists, academics and specialists have distilled their knowledge of our country between the covers of one volume. The result is a book for every Canadian who values learning, and values Canada.

Citizenship and Multiculturalism in Western Liberal Democracies

61 How should we understand a “good citizen” in the context of a multicultural society? Pronounced in 1971, Canada's official multiculturalism has been read as connected to the expression of human rights62 (Kymlicka 2007).

Citizenship and Multiculturalism in Western Liberal Democracies

Reflections on Citizenship and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Western Liberal Democracies explores the classical understanding of citizenship in dialogue with liberal contractual theorists and multicultural theorists in an effort to understand the complexity and diversity of perspectives on citizenship.

Cultures of Citizenship in Post war Canada 1940 1955

Worried observers noted that the average Canadian's post-war surroundings would need to be both a product of and a haven from ... an issue to which Citizens' Forum devoted an early show in 1943.85 One urbanist urged cities to plan, ...

Cultures of Citizenship in Post war Canada  1940   1955

The years between the end of World War II and the mid-1960s have usually been viewed as an era of political and social consensus made possible by widely diffused prosperity, creeping Americanization and fears of radical subversion, and a dominant culture challenged periodically by the claims of marginal groups. By exploring what were actually the mainstream ideologies and cultural practices of the period, the authors argue that the postwar consensus was itself a precarious cultural ideal that was characterized by internal tensions and, while containing elements of conservatism, reflected considerable diversity in the way in which citizenship identities were defined. Contributors include Denyse Baillargeon (Université de Montréal), P.E. Bryden (Mount Allison University), Nancy Christie, Michael Gauvreau, Karine Hebert (Carleton University), Len Kuffert (Carleton University), and Peter S. McInnis (St Francis Xavier University).

Indexing Behaviours Indicative of Ecological Citizenship in Canada

The concept of ecological citizenship, a transformative ideology of citizenship whereby citizens are connected through their moral environmental obligations, has been mainly theoretical in nature within contemporary literature.

Indexing Behaviours Indicative of Ecological Citizenship in Canada

The concept of ecological citizenship, a transformative ideology of citizenship whereby citizens are connected through their moral environmental obligations, has been mainly theoretical in nature within contemporary literature. In addition, the literature on pro-environmental behaviours presupposes that individuals face barriers both externally and internally, preventing their participation in these activities. A lack of nationally representative data exists that quantifies the impacts on pro-environmental behaviour participation. This thesis aims to address these three components by applying the theoretical foundation of ecological citizenship to a dataset covering the environmental household behaviours of a sample of Canadian households (N = 22,363) representative of the majority of the Canadian population. The creation of an index of behaviours that could be theoretically associated with ecological citizenship is the primary goal of this thesis. The analysis then examines the index alongside variables that situate both the geographic, socio-economic, and demographic characteristics of these households. Using a combination of multivariate linear and logistic regressions, the impact of these variables will be analyzed to identify the strength and direction of these variables, taking into consideration the effect of all variables at once. Findings suggest that certain variables have a greater impact on the number of behaviours a household can participate in. From these findings, a discussion of how best to address these impacts is explored within the context of our foundation on ecological citizenship and how best to bring this theoretical concept into an applied sphere of thinking.

Canadian Public Administration in the 21st Century

In the 1999 Speech from the Throne, the federal government declared it was committed to becoming “known around the world as the government most connected to its citizens, with Canadians able to access all government information and ...

Canadian Public Administration in the 21st Century

The demands associated with good governance and good public management are at an all-time high. Yet the discipline of Canadian public administration is in flux, and the time is ripe for an open and frank analysis of its state and possibilities. Canadian Public Administration in the 21st Century brings together emerging voices in Canadian public administration to consider current and future prospects in the discipline. A new wave of scholars has brought new energy, ambition, and perspectives to the field. In this book they take stock and build on established traditions and current trends, focusing on emerging, or reemerging, issues and challenges. The book identifies and analyzes the emergent research agenda in public administration, focusing on Canada to illustrate key concepts, frameworks, and issues. It consists of three thematically organized sections, exploring processes, structures, and principles of Canadian public administration. It addresses the broad, emergent trend in processes of service delivery or policy implementation generally referred to as the new public governance. It then critically examines the structural and institutional dimensions of Canadian public administration in light of recent directions in the field. A complete exploration of new principles, methods, values, and ethics in Canadian public administration research and practice rounds out the coverage. Bringing together emerging scholars, the book bridges the gap between established analytical traditions and novel theoretical and methodological approaches in the field. It proposes a new, more interdisciplinary public administration increasingly focused on governance and not solely on management.

Community Practice in the Network Society

It reflected the existing government's views of citizenship and social cohesion: Canada has a unique model of citizenship, ... This model requires deliberate efforts to connect Canadians across their differences, to link them to their ...

Community Practice in the Network Society

Around the world, citizens in local communities are utilising ICTs to underpin the creation of a participatory and democratic vision of the network society. Embedded in the richness and diversity of community practice, a vision of a 'civil network society' is emerging. A society where ICTs are harnessed as tools to improve the quality of life and reflect the diversity of social networks; where people are viewed as citizens, not just as consumers, and where heterogeneity is perceived as a strength rather than a weakness. Community Practice in the Network Society looks at the broad context in which this is happening, presents case studies of local projects from around the world, and discusses community ICT research methodologies. Not only does it highlight the symbiotic relationship between community ICT practice and research, but it also provides evidence supporting the case for the development of more inclusive and participatory pathways to the network society.

International Women s Rights Cases

The appellant Law Society submitted that the Court of Appeal erred in its consideration of the citizenship ... consider that Canadian citizenship could reasonably be regarded by the legislature as a requirement for the practice of law.

International Women s Rights Cases

The last two decades have seen major advances in the legal protection of the human rights of women around the world. A series of international and national court cases has developed an important body of jurisprudence that has been relied on by courts and advocates in many countries to support women's claims for equality and the full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms. Growing out of a series of judicial colloquia organized by the Commonwealth Secretariat, this compilation brings together a selection of over fifty significant cases from international and national courts. The cases are grouped by theme and presented in full text or edited format. Together they highlight the way in which courts have used international human rights norms and national constitutional standards to contribute to women's equality. A detailed introduction provides a summary of the significance of the cases and references further material available on women's human rights. Cases decided under United Nations human rights treaties, the European and American Conventions on Human Rights and other international instruments, as well as cases decided by national courts in Asia, Africa, Europe, Australasia, and North America are all included. The compilation will be of interest to all those with an interest in the advancement of the human rights of women especially equality advocates, lawyers and judges, scholars and students.

Projecting Citizenship

government officials escalated (news reports claim some passengers hurled hunks of coal at the Canadian immigration officers ... connected Britain, India, Hong Kong, and Canada within a circuitous, albeit uneven, movement of peoples, ...

Projecting Citizenship

In Projecting Citizenship, Gabrielle Moser gives a comprehensive account of an unusual project produced by the British government’s Colonial Office Visual Instruction Committee at the beginning of the twentieth century—a series of lantern slide lectures that combined geography education and photography to teach schoolchildren around the world what it meant to look and to feel like an imperial citizen. Through detailed archival research and close readings, Moser elucidates the impact of this vast collection of photographs documenting the land and peoples of the British Empire, circulated between 1902 and 1945 in classrooms from Canada to Hong Kong, from the West Indies to Australia. Moser argues that these photographs played a central role in the invention and representation of imperial citizenship. She shows how citizenship became a photographable and teachable subject by tracing the intended readings of the images that the committee hoped to impart to viewers and analyzing how spectators may have used their encounters with these photographs for protest and resistance. Moser shows how the Visual Instruction Committee pictured citizenship within an everyday context and decenters the preoccupation with trauma, violence, atrocity, and conflict that characterizes much of the theoretical literature on visual citizenship and demonstrates that the relationship between photography and citizenship emerged not in the dismantling of modern colonialism but in its consolidation. Interweaving political and economic history, history of pedagogy, and theories of citizenship with a consideration of the aesthetic and affective dimensions of viewing the lectures, Projecting Citizenship offers important insights into the social inequalities and visual language of colonial rule.