Immigration

The 13 contributions to this new book are refreshingly progressive interventions into the national debate on immigration. They agree that divergent approaches exist among progressives and that such differences must be examined.

Immigration

Public policy on immigration will be central to determining the form and character of U.S. society in the twenty-first century. The political Right has so far seized the initiative in defining the parameters of the discussion, in effect limiting national debate to choosing between degrees of restrictionism. Immigration: A Civil Rights Issue for the Americas fills a gap in existing literature on immigration by providing a variety of perspectives among those who agree that immigrants have rights, but may differ about how to assert those rights. First published in the quarterly journal Social Justice in 1996, these essays are written by some of the most notable scholars in the area of immigration. This volume will be valuable for classroom use and beyond because of the readable and accessible style of the articles. The 13 contributions to this new book are refreshingly progressive interventions into the national debate on immigration. They agree that divergent approaches exist among progressives and that such differences must be examined. Calling upon that which is best in the democratic heritage of the U.S., this collection challenges the historic and ongoing civil rights struggle to adopt a global perspective that includes the civil rights of all immigrants, whether documented or undocumented. In addition, the book takes on issues that are relevant to everyday realities in most communi-ties throughout the U.S. Immigration: A Civil Rights Issue for the Americas is ideal for courses on 20th-century American history, immigration, sociology, political science, and other social sciences.

The Intersection of Immigration Law and Civil Rights Law

Using the theory set forth in the book EYES OFF THE PRIZE, where historian Carol Anderson analyzes the reasons why, during Civil Rights Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People leadership was not able to ...

The Intersection of Immigration Law and Civil Rights Law

This article examines the failure of the U.S. civil rights regime, in particular, antidiscrimination law to redress the inequitable fashion in which our domestic legal system treats undocumented workers in the United States. The article posits that the future of the civil rights of noncitizens in the United States lies in an international human rights paradigm. Using the theory set forth in the book EYES OFF THE PRIZE, where historian Carol Anderson analyzes the reasons why, during Civil Rights Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People leadership was not able to articulate a human rights case for their struggles, I compare the Civil Rights Movement to the emerging Immigrant Rights Movement of today. In doing so, I make the case that the use of international human rights law to redress the rights of undocumented workers will take advantage of the opportunity that the leaders of the Civil Rights movement missed. My conclusion is that the use of an international human rights paradigm will not only address the shortcoming of civil rights law, but that, in the face of the currently existing lowered social citizenship of immigrants and the poor, this will be the only way to ensure equal social citizenship for all in our country.

Remaking the American Mainstream

But as Richard Alba and Victor Nee show in the first systematic treatment of assimilation since the mid-1960s, it continues to shape the immigrant experience, even though the geography of immigration has shifted from Europe to Asia, Africa, ...

Remaking the American Mainstream

In this age of multicultural democracy, the idea of assimilation--that the social distance separating immigrants and their children from the mainstream of American society closes over time--seems outdated and, in some forms, even offensive. But as Richard Alba and Victor Nee show in the first systematic treatment of assimilation since the mid-1960s, it continues to shape the immigrant experience, even though the geography of immigration has shifted from Europe to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Institutional changes, from civil rights legislation to immigration law, have provided a more favorable environment for nonwhite immigrants and their children than in the past. Assimilation is still driven, in claim, by the decisions of immigrants and the second generation to improve their social and material circumstances in America. But they also show that immigrants, historically and today, have profoundly changed our mainstream society and culture in the process of becoming Americans. Surveying a variety of domains--language, socioeconomic attachments, residential patterns, and intermarriage--they demonstrate the continuing importance of assimilation in American life. And they predict that it will blur the boundaries among the major, racially defined populations, as nonwhites and Hispanics are increasingly incorporated into the mainstream.

Fear Anxiety and National Identity

Fear, Anxiety, and National Identity investigates the multifaceted connections among immigration, belonging, and citizenship, and provides new ways of thinking about national identity.

Fear  Anxiety  and National Identity

Fifty years of large-scale immigration has brought significant ethnic, racial, and religious diversity to North America and Western Europe, but has also prompted hostile backlashes. In Fear, Anxiety, and National Identity, a distinguished multidisciplinary group of scholars examine whether and how immigrants and their offspring have been included in the prevailing national identity in the societies where they now live and to what extent they remain perpetual foreigners in the eyes of the long-established native-born. What specific social forces in each country account for the barriers immigrants and their children face, and how do anxieties about immigrant integration and national identity differ on the two sides of the Atlantic? Western European countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom have witnessed a significant increase in Muslim immigrants, which has given rise to nativist groups that question their belonging. Contributors Thomas Faist and Christian Ulbricht discuss how German politicians have implicitly compared the purported “backward” values of Muslim immigrants with the German idea of Leitkultur, or a society that values civil liberties and human rights, reinforcing the symbolic exclusion of Muslim immigrants. Similarly, Marieke Slootman and Jan Willem Duyvendak find that in the Netherlands, the conception of citizenship has shifted to focus less on political rights and duties and more on cultural norms and values. In this context, Turkish and Moroccan Muslim immigrants face increasing pressure to adopt “Dutch” culture, yet are simultaneously portrayed as having regressive views on gender and sexuality that make them unable to assimilate. Religion is less of a barrier to immigrants’ inclusion in the United States, where instead undocumented status drives much of the political and social marginalization of immigrants. As Mary C. Waters and Philip Kasinitz note, undocumented immigrants in the United States. are ineligible for the services and freedoms that citizens take for granted and often live in fear of detention and deportation. Yet, as Irene Bloemraad points out, Americans’ conception of national identity expanded to be more inclusive of immigrants and their children with political mobilization and changes in law, institutions, and culture in the wake of the Civil Rights Movement. Canadians’ views also dramatically expanded in recent decades, with multiculturalism now an important part of their national identity, in contrast to Europeans’ fear that diversity undermines national solidarity. With immigration to North America and Western Europe a continuing reality, each region will have to confront anti-immigrant sentiments that create barriers for and threaten the inclusion of newcomers. Fear, Anxiety, and National Identity investigates the multifaceted connections among immigration, belonging, and citizenship, and provides new ways of thinking about national identity.

Immigration Detention and Human Rights

152 human rights norms weakened the link between nationality and social membership is most distinctly illustrated in the case of legal, long-term residents. In addition to civil rights, most European states grant long-term legal ...

Immigration Detention and Human Rights

Practices of immigration detention in Europe are largely resistant to conventional forms of legal correction. By rethinking the notion of territorial sovereignty in modern constitutionalism, this book puts forward a solution to the problem of legally permissive immigration detention.

Mass Immigration and the National Interest

The Spillover Effect of the Civil Rights Movement to Immigration Reform In the early 1960s , the major domestic issue was not immigration reform , but the drive for a national civil rights policy . But the destinies of these two issues ...

Mass Immigration and the National Interest

Briggs (labor economics, Cornell University) describes the country's immigration policies as a hodge-podge of counter productive and special interest provisions, showing how immigration patterns are in direct conflict with emerging labor market trends and how they threaten the jobs of American workers, and offers suggestions for immigration policy reform. This third edition is revised and updated, drawing on data from the 2000 Census. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).

Religion in Gender Based Violence Immigration and Human Rights

Gender-based violence, immigration, and religious expression have dominated human rights discourse in modern society. Gender-based violence is recognized as a human rights issue, a public concern, and a barrier to development, ...

Religion in Gender Based Violence  Immigration  and Human Rights

This book builds on work that examines the interactions between immigration and gender-based violence, to explore how both the justification and condemnation of violence in the name of religion further complicates our societal relationships. Violence has been described as a universal challenge that is rooted in the social formation process. As humans seek to exert power on the other, conflict occurs. Gender based violence, immigration, and religious values have often intersected where patriarchy-based power is exerted on the other. An international panel of contributors take a multidisciplinary approach to investigating three central themes. Firstly, the intersection between religion, immigration, domestic violence, and human rights. Secondly, the possibility of collaboration between various social units for the protection of immigrants’ human rights. Finally, the need to integrate faith-based initiatives and religious leaders into efforts to transform attitude formation and general social behavior. This is a wide-ranging and multi-layered examination of the role of religion in gender-based violence and immigration. As such, it will be of keen interest to academics working in religious studies, gender studies, politics, and ethics.

Emanuel Celler

But this fall, he will at last be the focus of a full-length biography, Emanuel Celler: Immigration and Civil Rights Champion. And I believe it will become the go-to book for anyone wanting to know more about this history-making legislator.

Emanuel Celler

Congressman Emanuel Celler (1888–1981) was a New York City congressman who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1923 to 1973. Celler’s almost fifty-year career was highlighted by his long fight to eliminate national origin quotas as a basis for immigration restrictions and his battles for civil rights legislation. In Emanuel Celler: Immigration and Civil Rights Champion, author Wayne Dawkins introduces new readers to a figure integral to our contemporary political system. Celler’s own immigrant background framed his lifelong opposition to immigration restrictions and his corresponding support for reducing barriers for immigrant entry into the United States. After decades of struggle, he proposed and steered through the House the Hart-Celler Act of 1965, which eliminated national origins as a consideration for immigration, profoundly shaping modern America. Celler was also a consistent advocate for civil rights. As chairman of the House Judiciary Committee from 1949 to 1973 (except for a break from 1953 to 1955), Celler was involved in drafting and passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. During his career he was also deeply involved in landmark antitrust legislation, the establishment of US ties with the state of Israel, and the Gun Control Act of 1968, and was the author of three constitutional amendments, including the 25th that established presidential succession. Dawkins profiles a complex politician who shaped the central tenets of Democratic Party liberalism for much of the twentieth century and whose work remains central to the nation, and our political debates, today. From author Wayne Dawkins: Emanuel Celler (1888–1981) could be the most significant US legislator of the twentieth century. He cosponsored three Constitutional amendments—the twenty-third (voting rights for District of Columbia residents), the twenty-fourth (poll taxes banned), and the twenty-fifth (clear succession established if the president is removed from office). And, as a longtime chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, he reluctantly cosponsored a fourth—the twenty-sixth amendment (18-year-old voting rights). He is also linked to three-hundred laws, notably the Civil Rights Acts of 1957, 1960, 1964 and 1968; the Voting Rights Act of 1965; and his masterpiece, the Hart-Celler Immigration Reform Act of 1965. Over the past decade, Celler, who served fifty years in Congress, has been a supporting cast member in at least a dozen books about immigration or civil rights. He was frequently cited in One Mighty and Irresistible Tide (2020) and noted in two key moments of The Guarded Gate (2019). And he was cited generously in Goliath (2019), a book about Celler’s other passion—antitrust and monopoly busting. But this fall, he will at last be the focus of a full-length biography, Emanuel Celler: Immigration and Civil Rights Champion. And I believe it will become the go-to book for anyone wanting to know more about this history-making legislator.

U S Immigration Policy in an Age of Rights

The elimination of discriminatory national origins quotas and an emphasis on family reunification in U.S. immigration policy have resulted in an increase in the annual legal ceiling on immigration . Moreover , civil rights ...

U S  Immigration Policy in an Age of Rights

Civil rights rhetoric has been central to the debate over U.S. immigration policy since the 1960s. DeLaet shows how this rhetoric helps to explain the liberalization of U.S. immigration policy in recent decades and contributes to rising numbers of both legal and illegal immigrants.

Collision Course

In Collision Course, Hugh Davis Graham explains how two such well-intended laws came into conflict with each other when employers, acting under affirmative action plans, hired millions of new immigrants ushered in by the Immigration Act, ...

Collision Course

When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 were passed, they were seen as triumphs of liberal reform. Yet today affirmative action is foundering in the great waves of immigration from Asia and Latin America, leading to direct competition for jobs, housing, education, and government preference programs. In Collision Course, Hugh Davis Graham explains how two such well-intended laws came into conflict with each other when employers, acting under affirmative action plans, hired millions of new immigrants ushered in by the Immigration Act, while leaving high unemployment among inner-city blacks. He shows how affirmative action for immigrants stirred wide resentment and drew new attention to policy contradictions. Graham sees a troubled future for both programs. As the economy weakens and antiterrorist border controls tighten, the competition for jobs will intensify pressure on affirmative action and invite new restrictions on immigration. Graham's insightful interpretation of the unintended consequences of these policies is original and controversial.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 c

Drawing from studies in law, political science, anthropology, and economics, this book will be an essential tool for any scholar or student interested in immigration law.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 c

Along with the civil rights and voting rights acts, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 is one of the most important bills of the civil rights era. The Act's political, legal, and demographic impact continues to be felt, yet its legacy is controversial. The 1965 Act was groundbreaking in eliminating the white America immigration policy in place since 1790, ending Asian exclusion, and limiting discrimination against Eastern European Catholics and Jews. At the same time, the Act discriminated against gay men and lesbians, tied refugee status to Cold War political interests, and shattered traditional patterns of Mexican migration, setting the stage for current immigration politics. Drawing from studies in law, political science, anthropology, and economics, this book will be an essential tool for any scholar or student interested in immigration law.

Civil Rights Update

Immigration from page 10 91 of the civil rights agenda , ” Chisti said . Various panelists sought to articulate how immigration and civil rights are interrelated . Maria Jimenez , Director of the Immigration Law Enforcement Monitoring ...

Civil Rights Update


Race Rights and the Asian American Experience

In this second edition, Ancheta also covers post-9/11 anti-Asian sentiment and racial profiling. --From publisher description. –9/11 anti-Asian sentiment and racial profiling.

Race  Rights  and the Asian American Experience

Demonstrates how United States civil rights laws have been framed by a black-white model of race that typically ignores the experiences of other groups, including Asian Americans. When racial discourse is limited to antagonisms between black and white, Asian Americans often find themselves in a racial limbo, marginalized or unrecognized as full participants. Ancheta examines legal and social theories of racial discrimination, ethnic differences in the Asian American population, nativism, citizenship, language, school desegregation and affirmative action. In this second edition, Ancheta also covers post-9/11 anti-Asian sentiment and racial profiling. --From publisher description.

Immigration and the Nation state

In Part 2, the author addresses the ways in which immigration impacts upon citizenship, arguing for the continuing relevance of national citizenship for integrating immigrants, albeit modified by nationally distinct schemes of ...

Immigration and the Nation state

In this important and timely new study Professor Joppke compares the postwar politics of immigration control and immigrant integration in the United States, Germany, and Britain - three liberal states characterized by sharply distinct nationhood traditions and immigration experiences. Mappingout the many variations between these cases, the book focuses on the impact of immigration in the two key areas of sovereignty and citizenship. In Part 1, the author analyses the effect of immigration control on state sovereignty, arguing that liberal states are self-limited by interest-grouppluralism, autonomous legal systems, and moral obligations toward particular immigrant groups - the weight of these factors differing across particular cases. In Part 2, he addresses the ways in which immigrant integration impacts upon citizenship, arguing for the continuing relevance of nationalcitizenship for incorporating immigrants, albeit modified by nationally distinct schemes of multiculturalism. In the face of current diagnoses of nation-states weakened by the external forces of globalization and international human rights regimes and discourses, Professor Joppke demonstrates that,in relation to immigration at least, nation-states have proved remarkably resilient. Not only does this book offer an thorough, insightful examination of the immigration experiences of the USA, Germany, and Britain, it also makes a powerful contribution to the growing macro-sociological andpolitical science literature on immigration, citizenship, and the nation-state.

Immigration and the Politics of American Sovereignty 1890 1990

follows closely what we do in the field of civil rights. In our view, reform of the immigration laws is an integral part of our responsibility as leader of the free world.”127 The civil rights movement focused legislators' attention on ...

Immigration and the Politics of American Sovereignty  1890 1990

An exploration of how and why public arguments about immigrants change over time—and of the implications for our understanding of national sovereignty

National Security and Immigration

Reform Act of 1965 suggests that it was primarily a product of the civil rights movement . For example , Desmond King notes , “ It is not coincidental that the 1965 Immigration Act was enacted in the wake of the country's civil rights ...

National Security and Immigration

Includes statistical tables and graphs.

Citizens Strangers And In betweens

In Citizens, Strangers, and In-Betweens, an integrated series of fourteen essays, Yale professor Peter Schuck analyzes the complex social forces that have been unleashed by unprecedented legal and illegal migration to the United States, ...

Citizens  Strangers  And In betweens

Immigration is one of the critical issues of our time. In Citizens, Strangers, and In-Betweens, an integrated series of fourteen essays, Yale professor Peter Schuck analyzes the complex social forces that have been unleashed by unprecedented legal and illegal migration to the United States, forces that are reshaping American society in countless ways. Schuck first presents the demographic, political, economic, legal, and cultural contexts in which these transformations are occurring. He then shows how the courts, Congress, and the states are responding to the tensions created by recent immigration. Next, he explores the nature of American citizenship, challenging traditional ways of defining the national community and analyzing the controversial topics of citizenship for illegal alien children, the devaluation and revaluation of American citizenship, and plural citizenship. In a concluding section, Schuck focuses on four vital and explosive policy issues: immigration's effects on the civil rights movement, the cultural differences among various American ethnic groups as revealed in their experiences as immigrants throughout the world, the protection of refugees fleeing persecution, and immigration's effects on American society in recent years.

Migration Mobility and Human Rights at the Eastern Border of the European Union

Immigrants ́ inclusion in the local housing market thereby is similar to the situation within the agricultural employment sector. Realisation of civil rights and political mobilisation Extensive limitations both for legal as well as ...

Migration  Mobility and Human Rights at the Eastern Border of the European Union