Climates of Hunger

Climates of Hunger is a book of paramount importance for our time.

Climates of Hunger

In recent years, world climate changes have drawn more attention than at any other time in history. What we once called "crazy weather," just a few years ago, is now beginning to be seen as a part of a logical and, in part, predictable pattern, an awesome natural force that we must deal with if man is to avoid disaster of unprecedented proportions. Climates of Hunger is a book of paramount importance for our time. It will be essential reading not only for professionals in the field—including agricultural meteorologists, political scientists, geographers, sociologists, and business counselors—but for all who are concerned in any way with environmental trends, world and domestic food supplies, and their effects on human institutions.

Climates of hunger

Climates of hunger


Food Foolish

"One-third or more of the food we produce each year is never eaten. Food Foolish details the sources and consequences of this often unintended but ultimately foolish waste of one of the world's most precious resources.

Food Foolish


Mathematics of Uncertainty for Coping with World Challenges

This book ranks countries with respect to their achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and their vulnerability to climate change.

Mathematics of Uncertainty for Coping with World Challenges

This book ranks countries with respect to their achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals and their vulnerability to climate change. Human livelihoods, stable economies, health, and high quality of life all depend on a stable climate and earth system, and a diversity of species and ecosystems. Climate change significantly impacts human trafficking, modern slavery, and global hunger. This book examines these global problems using techniques from mathematics of uncertainty. Since accurate data concerning human trafficking and modern slavery is impossible to obtain, mathematics of uncertainty is an ideal discipline to study these problems. The book also considers the interconnection between climate change, world hunger, human trafficking, modern slavery, and the coronavirus. Connectivity properties of fuzzy graphs are used to examine trafficking flow between regions in the world. The book is an excellent reference source for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics and the social sciences as well as for researchers and teachers.

Climate Change and World Food Security

Are livelihoods more secure? Are nations wealthier and more resilient? Is environmental quality being restored or maintained? These are essential questions of development.

Climate Change and World Food Security

In the last half decade since sustainable development became a serious objective, what have we achieved? Are livelihoods more secure? Are nations wealthier and more resilient? Is environmental quality being restored or maintained? These are essential questions of development. Their answers are many, varied between communities and regions, even between individuals. Two years ago, in the aftermath of the Earth Summit and ratification of the Framework Convention on Climate Change, but before the first Conference of Parties, I participated in a panel at the inaugural Oxford Environment Conference on Climate Change and World Food Security. The panel vigorously reviewed issues of resilient development and food security. This book is a product of the Oxford Environment Conference. It takes the essential questions of sustainability as a starting point to focus on present food security and its future prospects in the face of climate change. Why is this book important? First, I believe our goals to end hunger are under threat. We know what to do in many respects, but fail to generate the finances and political will to change the structures that thrive on poverty. Second, I believe concern about the environment has become dangerously separated from the fundamental issues of human deprivation. Third, I believe climate change is a serious threat and I am dismayed at the way nations dither over how to control greenhouse gas emissions and mechanisms to meet the challenge of adverse climate impacts.

Climate change and hunger Estimating costs of adaptation in the agrifood system

This report assesses the cost of adaptation to climate change across a range of future climate scenarios and investment options.

Climate change and hunger  Estimating costs of adaptation in the agrifood system

This report assesses the cost of adaptation to climate change across a range of future climate scenarios and investment options. We focus on offsetting climate change impacts on hunger through investment in agricultural research, water management, and rural infrastructure in developing countries. We link climate, crop, water, and economic models to (1) analyze scenarios of future change in the agriculture sector to 2050 and (2) assess trade-offs for these investments across key Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for poverty, hunger, and water. Our reference projections show that climate change slows progress toward eliminating hunger, with an additional 78 million people facing chronic hunger in 2050 relative to a no-climate-change future, over half of them in Africa south of the Sahara. Increased investments can offset these impacts. Achieving this would require that annual investment in international agricultural research increase from US$1.62 billion to US$2.77 billion per year between 2015 and 2050. Additional water and infrastructure investments are estimated to be more expensive than agricultural R&D at about US$12.7 billion and US$10.8 billion per year, respectively, but these address key gaps to support transformation toward food system resiliency. Findings on ranges of costs and trade-offs and complementarities across SDGs will help policymakers make better-informed choices between alternative investment strategies.

Food Foolish

Food Foolish


Hot Hungry Planet

Here, she shares the story of the epic journey to solve the imperfect relationship between two of our planet’s greatest challenges: climate change and global hunger.

Hot  Hungry Planet

Earth will have more than 9.6 billion people by 2050 according to U.N. predictions. With resources already scarce, how will we feed them all? Journalist Lisa Palmer has traveled the world for years documenting the cutting-edge innovations of people and organizations on the front lines of fighting the food gap. Here, she shares the story of the epic journey to solve the imperfect relationship between two of our planet’s greatest challenges: climate change and global hunger. Hot, Hungry Planet focuses on three key concepts that support food security and resilience in a changing world: social, educational, and agricultural advances; land use and technical actions by farmers; and policy nudges that have the greatest potential for reducing adverse environmental impacts of agriculture while providing more food. Palmer breaks down this difficult subject though seven concise and easily-digestible case studies over the globe and presents the stories of individuals in six key regions—India, sub-Saharan Africa, the United States, Latin America, the Middle East, and Indonesia—painting a hopeful picture of both the world we want to live in and the great leaps it will take to get there.

A billion hungry people

The food price increases of 2007 and 2008 focused attention on a global food crisis that was already affecting more than 850 million people.

A billion hungry people

The food price increases of 2007 and 2008 focused attention on a global food crisis that was already affecting more than 850 million people. Even before the 2008 food riots, some 16,000 children were dying every day from hunger-related causes - one every five seconds. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that by the end of 2008, rising prices had added 109 million to the ranks of the hungry. Today, about one in six of the world's population goes short of food, almost a billion people. Although food prices fell in the final months of 2008, they remain above the long-term trend and are likely to do so for the foreseeable future. Two growing threats are likely to exarcerbate the problem of hunger: climate change is increasing the frequency and intensity of hazards such as floods, drought, and tropical cyclones that destroy crops, livestock, and livelihoods; and the global recession looks set to further increase the number of people going hungry because of its impact on employment, incomes, and public spending. The rapid and unpredictable fluctuations in food prices, exacerbated by volatile oil markets and increasing weather hazards, are a major challenge. Poor consumers in developing countries cannot buy food when prices rise, while sharply falling prices can destroy farmers' livelihoods and result in uncertainty that deters them from investing in increased production.

Climate Change and Hunger

This report reviews current knowledge of the effects of climate change on hunger. It summarizes knowledge from global studies completed and provides an overview of actions that can be taken to address the challenge.

Climate Change and Hunger

This report reviews current knowledge of the effects of climate change on hunger. It summarizes knowledge from global studies completed and provides an overview of actions that can be taken to address the challenge. We believe that unless climate change is mitigated by substantial reductions of greenhouse gases it will greatly increase hunger, especially in the poorest parts of the world. The scale of risk from climate change varies with assumptions about future development, especially future levels of poverty, but it is likely to affect tens to hundreds of millions of people. It is expected that Africa will be most affected, especially the semi-arid regions north and south of the equator. This is mainly because of projected increases in aridity resulting from climate change and because of high vulnerability consequent on low levels of income. The poorest parts of southern and south-eastern Asia are likely to be substantially affected, with strong negative impacts on agricultural production. Food production in other regions, for example Central America, may also be impacted.

Climate History and the Modern World

R.A.Bryson and T.J.Murray, 'Climates of Hunger', Madison, University of Wisconsin Press, 1977, 171 pp. Tickell, op. cit., p. 37 In a recent article the Chairman of the Esso Petroleum Company in Britain, Dr A.W.Pearce (in the 47th ...

Climate  History and the Modern World

We live in a world that is increasingly vulnerable to climatic shocks - affecting agriculture and industry, government and international trade, not to mention human health and happiness. Serious anxieties have been aroused by respected scientists warning of dire perils that could result from upsets of the climatic regime. In this internationally acclaimed book, Emeritus Professor Hubert Lamb examines what we know about climate, how the past record of climate can be reconstructed, the causes of climatic variation, and its impact on human affairs now and in the historical and prehistoric past. This 2nd Edition includes a new preface and postscript reviewing the wealth of literature to emerge in recent years, and discusses implications for a deeper understanding of the problems of future climatic fluctuations and forecasting.

Ending Hunger Challenge Badge

The Ending Hunger Challenge Badge is designed to help educate children and young people about the effects of hunger in the world and how we can put an end to it.

Ending Hunger Challenge Badge

The purpose of the United Nations challenge badges is to raise awareness, educate and, most of all, motivate young people to change their behavior and be active agents of change in their local communities. Challenge badges are appropriate for use with school classes and youth groups, and are endorsed by WAGGGS and WOSM. They include a wide range of activities and ideas that can easily be adapted by teachers or leaders. Additional badges are available or are being developed on a number of other topics, including: Agriculture, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Energy, Forests, Governance, Nutrition, the Ocean, Soils and Water. The Ending Hunger Challenge Badge is designed to help educate children and young people about the effects of hunger in the world and how we can put an end to it. This material is appropriate for use in school classes, Guide or Scout groups or youth meetings generally. It includes a wide range of activities and ideas to stimulate learning about hunger and nutrition issues, while motivating children and young people to get involved in the fight against world hunger.

On the Brink

On the Brink


The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018

These and other findings are detailed in the 2018 edition of The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World.

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018

New evidence this year corroborates the rise in world hunger observed in this report last year, sending a warning that more action is needed if we aspire to end world hunger and malnutrition in all its forms by 2030. Updated estimates show the number of people who suffer from hunger has been growing over the past three years, returning to prevailing levels from almost a decade ago. Although progress continues to be made in reducing child stunting, over 22 percent of children under five years of age are still affected. Other forms of malnutrition are also growing: adult obesity continues to increase in countries irrespective of their income levels, and many countries are coping with multiple forms of malnutrition at the same time – overweight and obesity, as well as anaemia in women, and child stunting and wasting. Last year’s report showed that the failure to reduce world hunger is closely associated with the increase in conflict and violence in several parts of the world. In some countries, initial evidence showed climate-related events were also undermining food security and nutrition. This year’s report goes further to show that climate variability and extremes – even without conflict – are key drivers behind the recent rise in global hunger and one of the leading causes of severe food crises and their impact on people’s nutrition and health. Climate variability and exposure to more complex, frequent and intense climate extremes are threatening to erode and reverse gains in ending hunger and malnutrition. Furthermore, hunger is significantly worse in countries where agriculture systems are highly sensitive to rainfall, temperature and severe drought, and where the livelihood of a high proportion of the population depends on agriculture. The findings of this report reveal new challenges to ending hunger, food insecurity and all forms of malnutrition. There is an urgent need to accelerate and scale up actions that strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity of people and their livelihoods to climate variability and extremes. These and other findings are detailed in the 2018 edition of The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World.

Terra Preta

This comprehensive book condenses everything we know about terra preta and provides instructions for how to make it. Both passionate and practical, the book offers indispensable advice for how to create a better world from the ground up."--

Terra Preta

"Terra preta, meaning "black earth" in Portuguese, is a very dark, fertile soil first made by the original inhabitants of the Amazon Basin at least 2,500 years ago. According to a growing community of international scientists, this ancient soil, sometimes referred to as biochar, could solve two of the greatest problems facing the world: climate change and the hunger crisis. This comprehensive book condenses everything we know about terra preta and provides instructions for how to make it. Both passionate and practical, the book offers indispensable advice for how to create a better world from the ground up."--