Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation

In light of this, the volume at hand is the first one to take a step ahead towards illuminating diverse aspects of word formation from cognitive perspectives.

Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation

While cognitive linguistics has become established as a comprehensive research paradigm over the last three decades, it has so far hardly contributed to investigations into processes of lexical creation as traditionally captured in research on word formation. In light of this, the volume at hand is the first one to take a step ahead towards illuminating diverse aspects of word formation from cognitive perspectives. The book combines contributions to the 2nd International Cognitive Linguistics Conference of the German Cognitive Linguistics Association with a selection of invited papers by scholars working on issues of word formation and cognitive linguistics. This selection is guided by pluralism in both methodology and topics. Thus, some contributions are of a primarily theoretical nature discussing, for example, recombinance as a model of word formation and a taxonomy of word formation processes as construction types. Several articles address interface issues such as word formation and phrasal constructions, word formation and inflection, as well as phonology and word formational patterns. The majority of the studies focuses on individual types of word formation (compounding, affixation, and conversion), and they contribute to reframing our understanding of these processes. With a focus on mostly Germanic languages (Afrikaans, Dutch, English, German, Luxembourgish, and Norwegian), data-driven analyses include corpus linguistic investigations, elicited data, psycholinguistic experiments, and computational linguistic applications. A few contributions follow a mainly introspective path of reasoning based on the discussion of selected examples as in the analysis of creative compounds. Overall, the volume provides a rich array of topics emerging under the umbrella of cognitive linguistic thought and established patterns and processes of word formation. The various studies add to a yet marginal body of research in cognitive word formation and, thus, advance our awareness about the benefits of applying cognitive linguistic thoughts for investigating processes of lexical creation.

Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation

If, along these lines, we disclaim a rigid objectivist approach to the definition of word as a basic segment of language with its many facets of characterization,2 the cognitive aspect of a word as representing a conceptual unit emerges ...

Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation

The series provides a comprehensive forum for publications in linguistics covering the entire range of language, including its variation and variability in space and time, its acquisition, theories on the nature of human language in general, and descriptions of individual languages. The series welcomes publications addressing the state of the art of linguistics as a whole or of specific subfields, and publications that offer challenging new approaches to linguistics. This volume is the first one to illuminate diverse aspects of word formation from cognitive perspectives. Guided by methodological pluralism, the contributions shed light on a variety of issues in word formation theory and on the interfaces between word formation and phraseology, phonology, and inflection. The majority of the studies focuses on individual types of word formation, reframing our understanding of these processes. Overall, the various contributions add to a yet marginal body of research in cognitive word formation and advance our awareness about the benefits of applying cognitive linguistic thoughts for investigating processes of lexical creation.

Handbook of Word Formation

This is the most comprehensive book to date on word formation in terms of scope of topics, schools and theoretical positions. All contributions were written by the leading scholars in their respective areas.

Handbook of Word Formation

This is the most comprehensive book to date on word formation in terms of scope of topics, schools and theoretical positions. All contributions were written by the leading scholars in their respective areas.

The Morphology of Chinese

This ground breaking study dispels the common belief that Chinese 'doesn't have words' but instead 'has characters'. Jerome Packard's book provides a comprehensive discussion of the linguistic and cognitive nature of Chinese words.

The Morphology of Chinese

This ground breaking study dispels the common belief that Chinese 'doesn't have words' but instead 'has characters'. Jerome Packard's book provides a comprehensive discussion of the linguistic and cognitive nature of Chinese words. It shows that Chinese, far from being 'morphologically impoverished', has a different morphological system because it selects different 'settings' on parameters shared by all languages. The analysis of Chinese word formation therefore enhances our understanding of word universals. Packard describes the intimate relationship between words and their components, including how the identities of Chinese morphemes are word-driven, and offers new insights into the evolution of morphemes based on Chinese data. Models are offered for how Chinese words are stored in the mental lexicon and processed in natural speech, showing that much of what native speakers know about words occurs innately in the form of a hard-wired, specifically linguistic 'program' in the brain.

Metonymy and Word Formation

This book deals with the interplay between word-formation and metonymy.

Metonymy and Word Formation

This book deals with the interplay between word-formation and metonymy. It shows that, like metaphor, metonymy interacts in important ways with morphological structure, but also warns us against a virtually unconstrained conception of metonymy. The central claim here is that word-formation and metonymy are distinct linguistic components that complement and mutually constrain each other. Using linguistic data from a variety of languages, the book provides ample empirical support for its thesis. It is much more than a systematic study of two neglected linguistic phenomena, for a long time thought to be unimportant by linguists. Through exposing and explaining the intricate interaction between metonymy and word formation from a cognitive linguistic perspective, the reader is presented with a sense of the amazing complexity of the development of linguistic systems. This book will be essential reading for scholars and advanced students interested in the role of figuration in grammar.

Word Formation

An interdisciplinary perspective, 3−25. ... 2010 Adjective + noun constructions between syntax and word formation in Dutch and German. In: Alexander Onysko and Sascha Michel (eds.), Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation, 195−215.

Word Formation

This handbook comprises an in-depth presentation of the state of the art in word-formation. The five volumes contain 207 articles written by leading international scholars. The XVI chapters of the handbook provide the reader, in both general articles and individual studies, with a wide variety of perspectives: word-formation as a linguistic discipline (history of science, theoretical concepts), units and processes in word-formation, rules and restrictions, semantics and pragmatics, foreign word-formation, language planning and purism, historical word-formation, word-formation in language acquisition and aphasia, word-formation and language use, tools in word-formation research. The final chapter comprises 74 portraits of word-formation in the individual languages of Europe and offers an innovative perspective. These portraits afford the first overview of this kind and will prove useful for future typological research. This handbook will provide an essential reference for both advanced students and researchers in word-formation and related fields within linguistics.

New Impulses in Word Formation

(2005): Handbook of Categorization in Cognitive Science. ... Linguistische Berichte 80/82, 3–17. Booij, G. (2009). “Phrasal names. A constructionist analysis”. Word ... (2010): Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation.

New Impulses in Word Formation

This special issue entitled "New Impulses in Word-Formation" demonstrates in thirteen individual, empirically oriented case studies how the methods gleaned from newer theoretical models (optimality theory, construction grammar, cognitive grammar, distributive morphology, parallel architecture) as well as from the linguistic sub-disciplines of psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, corpus linguistics and computational linguistics can be applied lucratively to the field of word-formation. The individual contributions are from a team of international linguists and deal with a broad spectrum of interests divided almost equally between the two major areas of word-formation, derivation and composition.

Competition in Inflection and Word Formation

Adjective + Noun Constructions Between Syntax and Word Formation in Dutch and German. In Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation, ed. Alexander Onysko and Sascha S. Michel, 195–215. Berlin: Mouton De Gruyter.

Competition in Inflection and Word Formation

This is the first volume specifically dedicated to competition in inflection and word-formation, a topic that has increasingly attracted attention. Semantic categories, such as concepts, classes, and feature bundles, can be expressed by more than one form or formal pattern. This departure from the ideal principle "one form – one meaning" is particularly frequent in morphology, where it has been treated under diverse headings, such as blocking, Elsewhere Condition, Pāṇini's Principle, rivalry, synonymy, doublets, overabundance, suppletion and other terms. Since these research traditions, despite the heterogeneous terminology, essentially refer to the same underlying problems, this volume unites the phenomena studied in this field of linguistic morphology under the more general heading of competition. The volume features an extensive state of the art report on the subject and 11 research papers, which represent various theoretical approaches to morphology and address a wide range of aspects of competition, including morphophonology, lexicology, diachrony, language contact, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and language acquisition.

Word Formation in Parallel Architecture

Adjective+Noun Construction Between Syntax and Word Formation in Dutch and German. In Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation, ed. Alexander Onysko and Michel Sascha, 195–215. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. Jackendoff, Ray. 1975.

Word Formation in Parallel Architecture

This book aims to reconcile the generative considerations of Jackendoff’s Parallel Architecture (PA) with the European structuralist approach to naming. It shows that there are good reasons to single out word formation as a separate component in PA. It demonstrates that it is a drawback not to distinguish word formation, and explains that the function of word formation rules is different from the function of the lexicon and rules of grammar. After making the argument for a separate word formation component, the book sets out to determine which types of rule qualify as part of this component. Traditionally, the boundaries of word formation with inflection and with syntax have been a matter of debate. By focusing on the naming function, the book poses a guiding principle for determining which rules should be in the word formation component. The position of morphology in the architecture of grammar has always been an issue of debate in generative linguistics. Since Chomsky (1970), this question has been framed in terms of the Lexicalist Hypothesis. Compared to Chomsky’s architectures, Jackendoff’s Parallel Architecture places phonetic and conceptual structures at the same level as syntactic structure, i.e. connected by bidirectional linking rules rather than interpretation rules. One of the consequences is that PA does not formally distinguish lexicon entries from rules of grammar. This changes the setting for the question of the autonomy of morphology, because the Lexicalist Hypothesis depends on this distinction.

Handbook of Japanese Lexicon and Word Formation

He taught Cognitive Linguistics at Osaka University before he moved to Nagoya University as Associate Professor in 2015. ... interest lies in the study of the lexicon and word formation from theoretical and neuro-cognitive perspectives.

Handbook of Japanese Lexicon and Word Formation

This volume presents a comprehensive survey of the lexicon and word formation processes in contemporary Japanese, with particular emphasis on their typologically characteristic features and their interactions with syntax and semantics. Through contacts with a variety of languages over more than two thousand years of history, Japanese has developed a complex vocabulary system that is composed of four lexical strata: (i) native Japanese, (ii) mimetic, (iii) Sino-Japanese, and (iv) foreign (especially English). This hybrid composition of the lexicon, coupled with the agglutinative character of the language by which morphology is closely associated with syntax, gives rise to theoretically intriguing interactions with word formation processes that are not easily found with inflectional, isolate, or polysynthetic types of languages.

Word Formation

This handbook comprises an in-depth presentation of the state of the art in word-formation. The five volumes contain 207 articles written by leading international scholars.

Word Formation

This handbook comprises an in-depth presentation of the state of the art in word-formation. The five volumes contain 207 articles written by leading international scholars. The XVI chapters of the handbook provide the reader, in both general articles and individual studies, with a wide variety of perspectives: word-formation as a linguistic discipline (history of science, theoretical concepts), units and processes in word-formation, rules and restrictions, semantics and pragmatics, foreign word-formation, language planning and purism, historical word-formation, word-formation in language acquisition and aphasia, word-formation and language use, tools in word-formation research. The final chapter comprises 74 portraits of word-formation in the individual languages of Europe and offers an innovative perspective. These portraits afford the first overview of this kind and will prove useful for future typological research. This handbook will provide an essential reference for both advanced students and researchers in word-formation and related fields within linguistics.

Word Formation in English

The grammar of words: An introduction to linguistic morphology, 3rd edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Börger, Claudia. 2007. Word-formation processes from a cognitive perspective: An analysis of complex prepositional lexemes.

Word Formation in English

This book is the second edition of a highly successful introduction to the study of word-formation, that is, the ways in which new words are built on the bases of other words (e.g. happy - happy-ness), focusing on English. The book's didactic aim is to enable students with little or no prior linguistic knowledge to do their own practical analyses of complex words. Readers are familiarized with the necessary methodological tools to obtain and analyze relevant data and are shown how to relate their findings to theoretical problems and debates. The second edition incorporates new developments in morphology at both the methodological and the theoretical level. It introduces to the use of new corpora and data bases, acquaints the reader with state-of-the-art computational algorithms modeling morphology, and brings in current debates and theories.

A Cognitive Linguistics Account of Wordplay

“Word formation or word formation? The formation of complex words in cognitive linguistics”. In Cognitive perspectives on word formation, edited by Alexander Onysko, Sasha Michel, 29-74. New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2010.

A Cognitive Linguistics Account of Wordplay

Even though the ability to create witty puns seems to be an inherent skill of humankind, an apt explanation of their linguistic nature has evaded many academic descriptions. This monograph offers a novel conceptual perspective on the creation of meaning observable beneath the surface of wordplay. The rationale for such an approach lies in the fact that language, and hence wordplay, is a cognitive phenomenon which involves some underlying complex mental processes, such as thinking in terms of image schemas, conceptual metaphor and metonymy, or blending, to mention just a few. The book provides a survey of relevant linguistic research, introduces the main tenets of cognitive linguistics, and offers an analysis of wordplay in the light of available cognitive literature. The final outcome of this work is an array of intricate mechanisms that govern creation and comprehension of wordplay. The book will be of interest to anybody who finds wordplay research appealing, no matter their level of expertise in the field.

The Construction of Words

Adjective C Noun constructions between syntax and word formation in Dutch and German. In Cognitive perspectives on word formation, ed. A. Onysko and S. Michel, 195– 215. Berlin/New York: De Gruyter Mouton. Jadacka, H. 2001.

The Construction of Words

This volume focuses on detailed studies of various aspects of Construction Morphology, and combines theoretical analysis and descriptive detail. It deals with data from several domains of linguistics and contributes to an integration of findings from various subdisciplines of linguistics into a common model of the architecture of language. It presents applications and extensions of the model of Construction Morphology to a wide range of languages. Construction Morphology is one of the theoretical paradigms in present-day morphology. It makes use of concepts of Construction Grammar for the analysis of word formation and inflection. Complex words are seen as constructions, that is, pairs of form and meaning. Morphological patterns are accounted for by construction schemas. These are the recipes for coining new words and word forms, and they motivate the properties of existing complex words. Both schemas and individual words are stored, and hence there is no strict separation of lexicon and grammar. In addition to abstract schemas there are subschemas for subclasses of complex words with specific properties. This architecture of the grammar is in harmony with findings from other empirical domains of linguistics such as language acquisition, word processing, and language change.

Current Research in Applied Linguistics

Issues on Language and Cognition Paula Rodríguez-Puente, Teresa Fanego, Evelyn Gandón-Chapela. —. 2008a. ... Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation ed. by Alexander Onysko and Sascha Michel (Trends in Linguistics, 221), 1-25.

Current Research in Applied Linguistics

This volume offers a representative selection of the papers presented at the Third ELC International Postgraduate Conference on Language and Cognition (ELC3), held in Santiago de Compostela, 21–22 September 2012. The book is structured into four parts. Part I comprises syntactic studies on the auxiliary verb get in Indian English, the grammar of verbs capable of occurring with or without an object in Contemporary English, and isolated if-clauses. Part II includes two papers dealing with word formation patterns and with crosslinguistic influences on motion expression in English and Spanish. The studies in Part III discuss topics related to second language acquisition, such as the difficulties encountered by Spanish speakers in learning English pronunciation, verbal morphology production by Japanese learners of English, and the effects of elicitation on students’ production of English past tense forms. The papers in Part IV revolve around discourse analysis and psycholinguistics, addressing topics such as automatic sentiment detection, perspectival construal patterns in language and cognition, and the effect of emotional valence on disambiguation processes.

New Insights into the Language and Cognition Interface

Cognitive perspectives on word formation: 219-242. Bloomfield, Leonard. 1933. Language. Chicago/London: The University of Chicago Press. Chomsky, Noam. 2014 [1965]. Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. No. 11. Massachusetts: MIT press.

New Insights into the Language and Cognition Interface

This book brings together, on the one hand, theoretical assumptions in cognitive linguistics and, on the other, empirical studies on language. It portrays, in a compact manner, the latest state of the dynamically changing research in five areas of cognitive explorations of language, including conceptual blending, discourse and narratology, multimodality, linguistic creativity, and construction grammar. These are shown mainly from the perspective of two languages: Polish and English. The volume will be of essential value to both students and scholars, as well as anyone interested in the application of current trends developed within cognitive linguistics to the empirical study of language and language-related phenomena.

Memorization and the Compound Phrase Distinction

Word-formation or word formation? The formation of complex words in Cognitive Linguistics. In Onysko, Alexander & Michel, Sascha (eds.), Cognitive perspectives on word formation (Trends in Linguistics: Studies and Monographs 221), ...

Memorization and the Compound Phrase Distinction

Over the last decades, it has been hotly debated whether and how compounds, i.e. word-formations, and phrases differ from each other. The book discusses this issue by investigating compounds and phrases from a structural, semantic-functional and, crucially, cognitive perspective. The analysis focuses on compounds and phrases that are composed of either an adjective and a noun or two nouns in German, French and English. Having distinguished compounds from phrases on structural and semantic-functional grounds, the author claims that compounds are by their nature more appropriate to be stored in the mental lexicon than phrases and supports his argument with empirical evidence from new psycholinguistic studies. In sum, the book maintains the separation between compounds and phrases and reflects upon its cognitive consequences.

The Evolution of Englishes

Words in the Mind. An Introduction to the Mental Lexicon. ... Word-formation or word formation? The formation of complex words in cognitive linguistics. In Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation, A. Onysko & S. Michel (eds) ...

The Evolution of Englishes

This two-part volume provides a collection of 27 linguistic studies and contributions that shed light on the evolution of different Englishes world-wide (varieties, learner Englishes, dialects, creoles) from a broad spectrum of different perspectives, including both synchronic and diachronic approaches. What makes the volume unique is that it is the first-ever contribution to the field which includes a section exclusively commited towards testing, discussing and refining Schneider’s (2007) Dynamic Model against recent realities of English world-wide (Part 1). These realities include a wide variety of case studies ranging from regions (socio)linguistically as diverse as South Africa, the Phillipines, Cyprus or Germany. Part 2 goes beyond the Dynamic Model and offers both empirical and theoretical perspectives on the evolution of World Englishes. In doing so, it provides contributions with a theoretical focus on the topic as well as cross-varietal accounts; it sheds light on individual Englishes from different geographical regions and offers new perspectives on “old” varieties.

Lexical Innovation in World Englishes

The Native Speaker: Multilingual Perspectives. New Delhi: Sage. ... In Štekauer, Pavol / Lieber, Rochelle (eds) Handbook of Word-Formation. ... In Onysko, Alexander / Michel, Sascha (eds) Cognitive Perspectives on Word Formation.

Lexical Innovation in World Englishes

Winner of the 2020 ESSE Book Award in English Language and Linguistics Lexical Innovation in World Englishes contributes to the investigation of World Englishes by offering insights into the lexical developments of selected English varieties and their cross-fertilization potential. Taking a theoretical and empirical approach and focusing on neological formations, this book: discusses and problematizes different categorizations of English varieties and processes of word formation, considering the expansion of English across the world; draws on authentic examples taken from language corpora to gain a finer understanding of the varieties’ transformations and of their reciprocal influences from a lexical perspective; aims to validate general considerations on the lexical features of these varieties of English and test them using corpora. Including eight empirical case studies, this innovative text shows the importance of investigating lexical developments to observe the evolution of a variety while arguing for the need to go beyond a purely structuralist approach and to include a broader discursive and sociological perspective. Lexical Innovation in World Englishes is key reading for postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of World Englishes and language varieties.