Collecting and the Internet

Essays on the Pursuit of Old Passions Through New Technologies

Collecting and the Internet

The Internet has had a profound effect on collecting—because of the Web, collectibles are now more readily available, collections more easily displayed for a wider audience, and collectors’ online communities are larger and often quite intimate. In addition, the Web has added new items to the pantheon of collectibles, including digital bits that, whether considered virtual or material, are nevertheless collectible. In this work, essays discuss the age-old habit of collecting and its modern relationship with the Internet. Topics include individually authored websites, online auctions, watches, eyewear, Kelly dolls, the gambler’s rush of online acquisition, mp3s, collecting friends via online social networking sites, and online museums, among others.

Online Instruments, Data Collection, and Electronic Measurements: Organizational Advancements

Organizational Advancements

Online Instruments, Data Collection, and Electronic Measurements: Organizational Advancements

"This book aims to assist researchers in both understanding and utilizing online data collection by providing methodological knowledge related to online research, and by presenting information about the empirical quality, the availability, and the location of specific online instruments"--Provided by publisher.

Collection and Presentation of Roadway Inventory Data

Collection and Presentation of Roadway Inventory Data


Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials

Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials

This book is the third of three paperback volumes taken from The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, Fourth Edition. It introduces the researcher to basic methods of gathering, analyzing and interpreting qualitative empirical materials. Part 1 moves from narrative inquiry, to critical arts-based inquiry, to oral history, observations, visual methodologies, and autoethnographic methods. It then takes up analysis methods, including computer-assisted methodologies, focus groups, as well as strategies for analyzing talk and text. The chapters in Part II discuss evidence, interpretive adequacy, forms of representation, post-qualitative inquiry, the new information technologies and research, the politics of evidence, writing, and evaluation practices.

Traffic Data Collection and its Standardization

Traffic Data Collection and its Standardization

A nice night of October 2007, in Beijing, during the XV World Conference on ITS a number of colleagues met informally for a dinner party that spontaneously became a vivid discussion on the importance of traffic data for all types of p- poses. Researchers can hardly do any progress in modeling, developing, and te- ing theories without suitable data, and what practitioners can do in real life is limited not only by technology but also by the availability of the required data. Quite frequently, the data and not the technologies are what determine how far we can go. Any discussion about traffic data leads in a natural way to a discussion on the variety of traffic data sources, formats, levels of aggregation, accuracies, and so on. Consequently, we moved to talk on the initiative that Kuwahara had undertaken in his traffic laboratory at the University of Tokyo, known as the International Traffic Data Base, and thus smoothly but inexorably we came to agree that it would be convenient to organize a workshop to continue our discussion at a more formal level, share our points of view with other colleagues, listen what they had to say and, if possible, d- seminate the findings in our professional and academic communities.

Data Collection and Analysis

Data Collection and Analysis

In simple and non-technical terms, this text illustrates a wide range of techniques and approaches used in social research projects.

Minerals, Collecting, and Value across the US-Mexico Border

Minerals, Collecting, and Value across the US-Mexico Border

Elizabeth Emma Ferry traces the movement of minerals as they circulate from Mexican mines to markets, museums, and private collections on both sides of the US-Mexico border. She describes how and why these byproducts of ore mining come to be valued by people in various walks of life as scientific specimens, religious offerings, works of art, and luxury collectibles. The story of mineral exploration and trade defines a variegated transnational space, shedding new light on the complex relationship between these two countries and on the process of making value itself.

Handbook of Research on Public Information Technology

Handbook of Research on Public Information Technology

"This book compiles estimable research on the global trend toward the rapidly increasing use of information technology in the public sector, discussing such issues as e-government and e-commerce; project management and information technology evaluation; system design and data processing; security and protection; and privacy, access, and ethics of public information technology"--Provided by publisher.

New Paths to Thick Descriptions

Innovativeness in Data Collection and Interpretation

New Paths to Thick Descriptions

Annotation The papers in this e-book focus on data collection and whilst none can claim to be completely new, all challenge our usual reliance on focus groups or depth interviews and challenge us to think more creatively of how we might get closer to the actual lived experience of consumers and consumption.

Acts of Possession

Collecting in America

Acts of Possession

The success of internet auction sites like eBay and the cult status of public television's Antiques Roadshow attest to the continued popularity of collecting in American culture. Acts of Possession investigates the ways cultural meanings of collections have evolved and yet remained surprisingly unchanged throughout American history. Drawing upon the body of theoretical work on collecting and focusing on individual as opposed to museum collections, the contributors investigate how, what, and why Americans have collected and explore the inherent meanings behind systems of organization and display. Essays consider the meanings of Thomas Jefferson's Indian Hall at Monticello; the pedagogical theories behind nineteenth-century children's curiosity cabinets; collections of Native American artifacts; and the ability of the owners of doll houses to construct meaning within the context of traditional ideals of domesticity. The authors also consider some darker aspects of collecting-hoarding, fetishism, and compulsive behavior-scrutinizing collections of racist memorabilia and fascist propaganda. The final essay posits the serial killer as a collector, an investigation into the dangerous objectification of humans themselves. By bringing fresh, interdisciplinary critical perspectives to bear on these questions, Dilworth and her coauthors weave a fascinating cultural history of collecting in America.