Collective Choice and Social Welfare

Collective Choice and Social Welfare

Originally published in 1970, this classic study has been recognized for its groundbreaking role in integrating economics and ethics, and for its influence in opening up new areas of research in social choice, including aggregative assessment. It has also had a large influence on international organizations, including the United Nations, notably in its work on human development. The book showed that the "impossibility theorems" in social choice theory--led by the pioneering work of Kenneth Arrow--do not negate the possibility of reasoned and democratic social choice. Sen's ideas about social choice, welfare economics, inequality, poverty, and human rights have continued to evolve since the book's first appearance. This expanded edition preserves the text of the original while presenting eleven new chapters of fresh arguments and results. "Expanding on the early work of Condorcet, Pareto, Arrow, and others, Sen provides rigorous mathematical argumentation on the merits of voting mechanisms...For those with graduate training, it will serve as a frequently consulted reference and a necessity on one's book shelf." --J. F. O'Connell, Choice

Collective Choice and Social Welfare

Collective Choice and Social Welfare

This book is concerned with the study of collective preference, in particular with the relationship between the objectives of social action and the preferences and aspirations of society's members. Professor Sen's approach is based on the assumption that the problem of collective choice cannot be satisfactorily discussed within the confines of economics. While collective choice forms a crucial aspect of economics, the subject pertains also to political science, the theory of the state, and to the theory of decision procedures. The author has therefore used material from these disciplines, plus philosophical aspects from ethics and the theory of justice.

Individual and Collective Choice and Social Welfare

Essays in Honor of Nick Baigent

Individual and Collective Choice and Social Welfare

The papers in this volume explore various issues relating to theories of individual and collective choice, and theories of social welfare. The topics include individual and collective rationality, motivation and intention in economics, coercion, public goods, climate change, and voting theory. The book offers an excellent overview over latest research in these fields.

Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare

Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare

This second part of a two-volume set continues to describe economists' efforts to quantify the social decisions people necessarily make and the philosophies that those choices define. Contributors draw on lessons from philosophy, history, and other disciplines, but they ultimately use editor Kenneth Arrow's seminal work on social choice as a jumping-off point for discussing ways to incentivize, punish, and distribute goods. Develops many subjects from Volume 1 (2002) while introducing new themes in welfare economics and social choice theory Features four sections: Foundations, Developments of the Basic Arrovian Schemes, Fairness and Rights, and Voting and Manipulation Appeals to readers who seek introductions to writings on human well-being and collective decision-making Presents a spectrum of material, from initial insights and basic functions to important variations on basic schemes

Choice, Welfare and Measurement

Choice, Welfare and Measurement

Choice, Welfare and Measurement contains many of Amartya Sen's most important contributions to economic analysis and methods, including papers on choice, preference, rationality, aggregation, and measurement. A substantial introductory essay interrelates his diverse concerns, and also analyzes discussions generated by the original papers, focusing on the underlying issues.

The Philosophy of Welfare Economics of Dr.Amartya Sen and Jain Philosophy

The Philosophy of Welfare Economics of Dr.Amartya Sen and Jain Philosophy

The subject of discussion in this book is the philosophy of welfare Economics. The collective choice and the subjects of freedom through development are discussed in welfare economics. Inequality is to be reduced and basal equality has to be evolved to aid human welfare. The entitlement approach is the only solution for poverty and famine. All four subjects are woven in philosophical thought by Dr.Amartya Sen for the wellbeing of people. The book is a humble attempt at dealing with the subject of human welfare through religion. Killing is rampant in one or another form. The mantra of non-violence is the most valuable message to the world. The concept of non-killing is brought to light with the ancient agamic text of ACHARANG SUTRA. The view of Mahatma Gandhi on Ahimsa (non-violence) is compared with the Jain religious principle in modern context. It is important to be tolerant and to be able to understand others view points in the present situation. This is possible through Anakantvada of Jain religion. The non-possessiveness of materialistic items and wealth are important issues discussed in the book. The Karma (deeds) are an important factor in ones life. Karma is solely responsible for the uplift or downfall of the human soul. Jain religion works for the wellbeing of the human soul.

Rational Choice and Social Welfare

Theory and Applications

Rational Choice and Social Welfare

This volume brings together papers, which were ?rst presented at the International Conference on Rational Choice, Individual Rights and Non-Welfaristic Normative Economics, held in honour of Kotaro Suzumura at Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, on 11–13 March 2006, and which have subsequently gone through the usual process of review by referees. We have been helped by many individuals and institutions in organizing the conference and putting this volume together. We are grateful to the authors of this volume for contributing their papers and to the referees who reviewed the papers. We gratefully acknowledge the very generous fundings by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, through the grant for the 21st Century Center of Excellence (COE) Program on the Normative Evaluation and Social Choice of Contemporary Economic Systems, and by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, through the grant for International Scienti?c Meetings in Japan, and the unstinted effort of the staff of the COE Program at Hitotsubashi University, without which the conference in 2006 would not have been possible. We thank Dr. Martina Bihn, the Editorial Director of Springer-Verlag for economics and business, for her advice and help. Finally, we would like to mention that it has been a great pleasure and privilege for us to edit this volume, which is intended to be a tribute to Kotaro Suzumura’s - mense intellectual contributions, especially in the theory of rational choice, welfare economics, and the theory of social choice. Riverside Prasanta K.

Collected Papers of Kenneth J. Arrow: Social choice and justice

Collected Papers of Kenneth J. Arrow: Social choice and justice

Arrow takes up the basic question of whether collective choices can reflect individual preferences. The seminal 1950 paper that opens the volume shows that given reasonable conditions that social choices must satisfy to reflect individual preferences, it is impossible to make a choice among alternatives without violating some of the conditions.

Social Decision Methodology for Technological Projects

Social Decision Methodology for Technological Projects

This book grew out of the conviction that the preparation and management of large-scale technological projects can be substantially improved. We have witnessed the often unhappy course of societal and political decision making concerning projects such as hazardous chemical installations, novel types of electric power plant or storage sites for solid wastes. This has led us to believe that probabilistic risk analysis, technical reliability analysis and environm,ental impact analysis are necessary but insufficient for making acceptable, and justifiable, social decisions about such projects. There is more to socio-technical decision making than applying acceptance rules based on neglige ably low accident probabilities or on maximum credible accidents. Consideration must also be given to psychological, social and political issues and methods of decision making. Our conviction initially gave rise to an international experts' workshop titled 'Social decision methodology for technological projects' (SDMTP) and held in May 1986 at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, at a time when Cvetkovich spent a sabbatical there. The work shop - aimed at surveying the issues and listing the methods to address them - was the first part of an effort whose second part was directed at the production of this volume. Plans called for the book to deal systematically with the main problems of socio-technical decision making; it was to list a number of useful approaches and methods; and it was to present a number of integrative conclusions and recommendations for both policy makers and methodologists.