Colloquial Hebrew

Specially written by experienced teachers for self-study and class use, the course offers you a step-by-step approach to written and spoken Hebrew.

Colloquial Hebrew

Colloquial Hebrew is easy to use and completely up-to-date. Specially written by experienced teachers for self-study and class use, the course offers you a step-by-step approach to written and spoken Hebrew. No prior knowledge of the language is required. What makes Colloquial Hebrew your best choice in personal language learning? Emphasis on conversational language with clear pronunciation guidance. Grammar section for easy reference. Comprehensive vocabulary lists (Hebrew-English and English-Hebrew). Stimulating exercises with lively illustrations. By the end of this rewarding course you will be able to communicate confidently and effectively in Hebrew in a broad range of everyday situations. Two 60-minute CDs are available to purchase separately or come included in the Colloquials Pack. Recorded by native speakers, these will help you perfect your pronunciation, listening and speaking skills.

Colloquial Hebrew

Colloquial Hebrew provides a step-by-step course in Hebrew as it is written and spoken today. Combining a user-friendly approach with a thorough treatment of the language, it equips learners with the essential skills needed to ...

Colloquial Hebrew

Colloquial Hebrew provides a step-by-step course in Hebrew as it is written and spoken today. Combining a user-friendly approach with a thorough treatment of the language, it equips learners with the essential skills needed to communicate confidently and effectively in Hebrew in a broad range of situations. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, this fully revised new edition of Colloquial Hebrew is an indispensable resource for both independent learners and students taking courses in Hebrew. This edition features an engaging story line throughout the book, encouraging the student to form dialogues and develop conversational skills. Key features include: • progressive coverage of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills • realistic and entertaining dialogues covering a broad variety of scenarios • translations and transliteration provided throughout in the key • structured, jargon-free explanations of grammar • an extensive, varied range of focused and stimulating exercises • useful vocabulary lists throughout the text • additional resources available at the back of the book and on the web, including a full answer key, a grammar summary, a list of verbs used in the book, a prepositions chart and glossaries Audio material to accompany the course is available to download free in MP3 format from www.routledge.com/cw/colloquials. Recorded by native speakers, the audio material features the dialogues and exercises from the book and will help develop your listening and pronunciation skills.

The Schizoid Nature of Modern Hebrew

do not seem to be aware that much of the merged Hebrew component in Yiddish ( and to a lesser extent the whole Hebrew of Yiddish and other Jewish languages ) constitutes a unique reservoir of old colloquial Hebrew features in all ...

The Schizoid Nature of Modern Hebrew

Hebrew is regarded as a former living language which ceased to be a native language 1800 years ago, only to be given a spoken function anew in the late 19th century. Since the re-acquisition of a lost colloquial function has never been documented, Modern Hebrew has become an object of fascination among linguists and laymen alike.In this book the author claims- Modern Hebrew is not a direct continuation of monolingual Semitic Hebrew- Modern Hebrew was created when Yiddish speaker re-lexified their language to Biblical and Mishnaic Hebrew- Yiddish is a Slavic language, derived from Sorbian and thus, Modern Hebrew is a Slavic LanguageThese claims raise a number of interesting questions: why do most speakers believe that Modern Hebrew is a Semitic language, what are the contributions of Modern Hebrew to the typology of diglossia, historical and genetic linguistics, universal grammar, 2nd language acquisition and political science?

Current Issues in Generative Hebrew Linguistics

First, the 1st person singular future is prescrip- tively part of the pro-drop paradigm; however, due to a phonological process taking place in colloquial Hebrew, the form of the 1st person singular in the future has become similar to ...

Current Issues in Generative Hebrew Linguistics

This volume presents a collection of specially commissioned papers devoted to analyzing the linguistics of Modern Hebrew from a number of perspectives. Various aspects of Modern Hebrew grammar are discussed including the structure of the lexicon, grammatical features and inflectional morphology, as well as the grammaticalization of semantic and pragmatic distinctions. The psycholinguistic issues addressed include the acquisition of morphological knowledge, the pro-drop parameter and question formation, as well as language use in hearing-impaired native speakers. The collection of these papers together in a single volume allows these phenomena to be considered not in isolation but in the context of the grammatical system of which the language is an expression. As a consequence, more general issues connected to Modern Hebrew begin to emerge, such as the role of the inflectional morphological system in the grammar, and a rich set of facts and analyses relevant for many related issues are made available to the reader.

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew

Since the spoken modality of Colloquial Hebrew has been significantly affected by languages with which it was in contact (e.g., Yiddish, Polish, Russian) the right periphery constructions attested in Hebrew reflect parallels in these ...

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew

Language Contact and the Development of Modern Hebrew, edited by Edit Doron, presents twenty four different innovative syntactic constructions of Modern Hebrew, attributing them to syntactic change due to the impact of contact languages on previous stages of Hebrew. The contents of this volume was also published as a special double issue of Journal of Jewish Languages, 3: 1-2 (2015).

For Max Weinreich on His Seventieth Birthday

Studies in Jewish languages, literature, and society Lucy S. Dawidowicz, Alexander Erlich, Rachel Erlich, ... But I prefer to see in this evolution in Modern Colloquial Hebrew a foreign inspiration with an original Hebrew construction .

For Max Weinreich on His Seventieth Birthday


Cognitive Foundations of Grammar

Hebrew offers another example of such a case: Its major have-construction is a canonical instance of the Goal Schema, as illustrated in (30). There are two varieties of modern Hebrew, however: Colloquial Israeli Hebrew (henceforth: ...

Cognitive Foundations of Grammar

The main function of language is to convey meaning. Therefore, argues Bernd Heine in these pages, the question of why language is structured the way it is must first of all be answered with reference to this function. Linguistic explanations offered in terms of other exponents of language structure (for example, syntax) are likely to highlight peripheral or epi-phenomenal--rather than central--characteristics of language structure. Heine provides a solid introductory treatment of the ways in which language structure (that is, grammar) and language usage can be explained with reference to the processes underlying human conceptualization and communication. Exploring an area of linguistics that has developed only recently and is rapidly expanding, Cognitive Foundations of Grammar will appeal to students of linguistics, psychology, and anthropology, especially those interested in grammaticalization processess.

Cognitive Foundations of Grammar

Hebrew offers another example of such a case: Its major have-construction is a canonical instance of the Goal Schema, as illustrated in (30). There are two varieties of modern Hebrew, however: Colloquial Israeli Hebrew (henceforth: ...

Cognitive Foundations of Grammar

The main function of language is to convey meaning. The question of why language is structured the way it is, Heine here argues, has therefore to be answered first of all with reference to this function. Linguistic explanations in terms of other exponents of language structure, e.g. of syntax, are likely to highlight peripheral or epi-phenomenal rather than central characteristics of language structure. This book uses basic findings on grammaticalization processes to describe the role of cognitive forces in shaping grammar. It provides students with an introductory treatment of a field of linguistics that has developed recently and is rapidly expanding.

The Cambridge History of Judaism Volume 2 The Hellenistic Age

At some stage this colloquial register of Hebrew began to have some sort of official status . As found in the Mishnah , the materials are striking for the terseness and abbreviation of their expression , and this might well fit with a ...

The Cambridge History of Judaism  Volume 2  The Hellenistic Age

Vol. 4 covers the late Roman period to the rise of Islam. Focuses especially on the growth and development of rabbinic Judaism and of the major classical rabbinic sources such as the Mishnah, Jerusalem Talmud, Babylonian Talmud and various Midrashic collections.

Chanting the Hebrew Bible

In colloquial French r may be uvulated, while in the formal style it is rolled or flipped. The observations in this chapter may not be relevant to the pronunciation of contemporary colloquial Hebrew, but they are appropriate for ...

Chanting the Hebrew Bible

In this encyclopedic text, completely revised and updated in this second edition, Joshua R. Jacobson presents the history of the ancient Jewish tradition of chanting the Bible and a comprehensive explanation of cantillation practice with its grammatical rules and regional variations. His unique step-by-step system of analysis shows how chanting dramatizes and interprets the meaning of the biblical text. Jacobson also provides complete notation for performing all six musical systems, an extensive guide to pronouncing biblical Hebrew, and pedagogical tips for cantillation teachers. Chanting the Hebrew Bible, Second Edition, will be invaluable to anyone interested in chanting, from beginners to advanced readers—from haftarah readers who want to chant from the Torah, to Bible students seeking greater insight into Masoretic texts, to Torah chanters who wish to fine-tune their skills, fill gaps in their knowledge, and understand the system they have known only intuitively until now. This second edition features a week-by-week guide to Torah, haftarah, and megillot readings for Shabbat and holidays; useful new examples and exercises; a new comprehensive general subject index; a new, easy-to-read, clear Hebrew font; and a link to a new website with audio recordings and video lessons. Chanting the Hebrew Bible will continue to be the definitive work on Torah chanting—the most authoritative guide and reference on the subject. For more information on Chanting the Hebrew Bible visit chantingthehebrewbible.com.

Selected Issues in the Modern Intercultural Contacts between Arabic and Hebrew Cultures

The lack of proficiency in colloquial Hebrew led to increased dependence on outdated Hebrew–Arabic lexicography, which did not always keep pace with modern Hebrew's development.247 Simultaneously, lack of familiarity with the Israeli ...

Selected Issues in the Modern Intercultural Contacts between Arabic and Hebrew Cultures

In Selected Issues in the Modern Intercultural Contacts between Arabic and Hebrew Cultures, Mahmoud Kayyal examines the modern intercultural contacts between Arabic and Hebrew cultures, especially translation activity between the two languages, Hebrew linguistic interference in the Palestinian literature, and Hebrew writings of Palestinian authors.

Contemporary Israel

Shmuel Bolozky, Measuring Productivity in Word Formation: The Case of Israeli Hebrew (Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, 1999). 9. Shlomo Izreel, “The Corpus of Colloquial Hebrew in Israel:Text Samples,” Leshonenu 64 (2002): 289–314.

Contemporary Israel

7. Jewish Ideological Killers: Religious Fundamentalism or Ethnic Marginality? -- 8. Israeli Fiction: National Identity and Private Lives -- 9. Israeli Hebrew: National Identity and Language -- 10. The Politics of Israel: Relations with the American Jewish Community -- Conclusion: Imagination and Reality in Scenarios of Israel's Future

Chanting the Hebrew Bible Student Edition

Nonetheless , there are many principles that are valid for all Hebrew pronunciation systems . Most languages have various " styles " of pronunciation . While colloquial diction is appropriate for a casual conversation among friends ...

Chanting the Hebrew Bible  Student Edition

The e-book edition does not include the audio CD that's included with the paperback edition. The most authoritative guide on cantillation. Joshua Jacobson?s masterpiece?the comprehensive 1000-page guide to cantillation?is now available in this e-book edition. It is an ideal instructional guide for adult and young-adult students of Torah, for b?nai mitzvah students, and for cantors, rabbis, and Jewish educators of all denominations. Like the original edition, it includes an explanation of the tradition and a description of the practice of chanting, with all its regional variations and grammatical rules. There is detailed instruction, with musical notation, on chanting of Torah, and shorter instructions for chanting the haftarah, the megillot, and readings for the High Holy Days. Joshua Jacobson, professor of music and conductor of the acclaimed Boston-based Zamir Chorale, has been Torah chanting since he was 10 years old. That life-long experience, combined with an unquenchable desire to reconnect the art of cantillation with the most convincing and accurate treatment of the ancient text possible, led him to create this indispensable teaching tool. Using Jacobson?s highly acclaimed approach, the ancient words come alive in a new, deeply emotional and most accurate way.

Apocalyptic Thinking in Early Judaism

For such proponents of colloquial Hebrew, the language must have continued being used in realms beyond the literary, based primarily on the evidence of Mishnaic Hebrew and a few waypoints such as 4QMMT, the Copper Scroll, and the Hebrew ...

Apocalyptic Thinking in Early Judaism

In Apocalyptic Thinking leading experts critically engage with John Collins’ seminal study The Apocalyptic Imagination and advance the debate on ancient Jewish apocalyptic with articles on current topics with a special focus on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Making of the Modern Jewish Bible

comment about the likelihood of the existence of a colloquial Hebrew in ancient Israel, different from the elevated language of the Hebrew Bible. There is evidence, moreover, that people in everyday life may have had different words for ...

The Making of the Modern Jewish Bible

The Making of the Modern Jewish Bible explains how Jewish translators, commentators, and scholars made the Bible a keystone of Jewish life in Germany, Israel and America. In each site, a particular need—religion, nationalism, ethnicity—drove the enterprise of Bible study as scholars wrestled with the demands of the non-Jewish environment and their own indigenous traditions. Contrary to popular conceptions, the author argues that the modern period has been the golden age of Jewish Bible study.

The Semitic Languages

Among the Hebrew texts from this period are letters in colloquial Hebrew and Aramaic from the time of Bar Kokhba's revolt against Rome (circa 130 CE) as well as Hebrew inscriptions on coins minted at this time.

The Semitic Languages

The handbook The Semitic Languages offers a comprehensive reference tool for Semitic Linguistics in its broad sense. It is not restricted to comparative Grammar, although it covers also comparative aspects, including classification. By comprising a chapter on typology and sections with sociolinguistic focus and language contact, the conception of the book aims at a rather complete, unbiased description of the state of the art in Semitics. Articles on individual languages and dialects give basic facts as location, numbers of speakers, scripts, numbers of extant texts and their nature, attestation where appropriate, and salient features of the grammar and lexicon of the respective variety. The handbook is the most comprehensive treatment of the Semitic language family since many decades.

Bible and Interpretation The Collected Essays of James Barr

At some stage this colloquial register of Hebrew began to have some sort of official status. As found in the Mishnah, the materials are striking for the terseness and abbreviation of their expression, and this might well fit with a ...

Bible and Interpretation  The Collected Essays of James Barr

The third of three volumes of James Barr's collected essays. This volumes includes Barr's extensive papers on linguistic matters relating to Biblical Hebrew and Greek, and on biblical translation in the ancient and the modern world.

Jewish and Non Jewish Creators of Jewish Languages

It is the rare scholar who would suggest that Yiddish might retain old colloquial Hebrew lexicon not easily retrievable from other sources . The neglect of the Hebrew norms of Yiddish and most other Jewish languages is all the more ...

Jewish and Non Jewish Creators of  Jewish  Languages

The present volume brings together 34 articles that were published between 1964 and 2003 on Judaized forms of Arabic, Chinese, German, Greek, Persian, Portuguese, Slavic (including Modern Hebrew and Yiddish, two Slavic languages "relexified" to Hebrew and German, respectively), Spanish and Semitic Hebrew (including Ladino - the Ibero-Romance relexification of Biblical Hebrew) and Karaite. The motivations for reissuing these articles are the convenience of having thematically similar topics appear together in the same venue and the need to update the interpretations, many of which have radically changed over the years. As explained in a lengthy new preface and in notes added to the articles themselves, the impetus to create strikingly unique Jewish ethnolects comes not so much from the creativity of the Jews but rather from non- Jewish converts to Judaism, in search (often via relexification) of a unique linguistic analogue to their new ethnoreligious identity. The volume should be of interest to students of relexification, of the Judaization of non-Jewish languages, and of these specific languages.

The Non Jewish Origins of the Sephardic Jews

The absence of colloquial Hebrew in the diasporas is important for establishing the chronology of Jewish settlement in southern Europe and North Africa . Colloquial Hebrew was abandoned in Palestine itself around the 3rd century A.d. We ...

The Non Jewish Origins of the Sephardic Jews

Based on the premise that Jewish languages such as Judeo- Arabic, Ladino, and Yiddish offer crucial clues to ethnic origins, Wexler (linguistics, Tel-Aviv U.) challenges the prevailing view that Sephardic Jewry originated in Spain, asserting that they were in fact descended from Berber proselytes. The author finds remnants of this North African Berber and Arab substrate in the language and culture of the Sephardic Jews and presents an array of linguistic (as well as historical, literary, and ethnographic) data in support of his hypothesis. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Text in Context

It is important ... to distinguish between two types of Biblical Hebrew prose . ... Rendsburg accepts no doubt , rightly -- the hypothesis that Mishnaic Hebrew developed from a form of colloquial Hebrew that had been used for several ...

Text in Context

The scholarly study of the Old Testament is now marked by a rich diversity of approaches and concerns. In the last two decades, an interest in the text and the implications for its interpretation is no longer the preserve of a single scholarly community, while the reconstruction of the history of the people from whom it derived has been transformed by new methods. This new book published under the auspices of the Society for Old Testament Study reflects these new approaches and developments, and has a particular concentration on literary and historical study. Thus, it not only clearly recognizes the diversity now inherent in 'Old Testament study', but also welcomes the integration into its field of the wide range of approaches available in current literary and historical investigation. The study of the biblical text and how it is received and interpreted by its various readerships has a certain logical priority over the study of its historical background and authorship. Yet an ongoing investigation of issues relating to the latter cannot await definitive conclusions on the former. So, essays on the text and its reception discuss primary issues which arise in Old Testament study, while those on background and authorship reflect the continued vitality of, and the fresh perspective possible in, more traditional scholarly concerns.