Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

Discover: ·How the springs at Hierapolis help us understand why Jesus described the church at Laodicea as “lukewarm” ·The background and circumstances of certificates of divorce in Judaism ·How Jewish dietary laws provided a powerful metaphor for God’s acceptance of the Gentiles Brimming with photos and graphics, the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary walks you verse by verse through all the books of the New Testament. It’s like slipping on a set of glasses that lets you read the Bible through the eyes of a first-century reader! Discoveries await you that will snap the world of the New Testament into gripping immediacy. Things that seem mystifying, puzzling, or obscure will take on tremendous meaning when you view them in their ancient context. You’ll deepen your understanding of the teachings of Jesus. You’ll discover the close, sometimes startling interplay between God’s kingdom and the practical affairs of the church. Best of all, you’ll gain a deepened awareness of the Bible’s relevance for your life. Written in a clear, engaging style, this beautiful set provides a new and accessible approach that more technical expository and exegetical commentaries don’t offer. It features: ·Commentary based on relevant papyri, inscriptions, archaeological discoveries, and studies of Judaism, Roman culture, Hellenism, and other features of the world of the New Testament ·Hundreds of photographs, illustrations, and line drawings ·Copious maps, charts, and timelines·Sidebar articles and insights ·“Reflections” on the Bible’s relevance for 21st-century living Written by leading evangelical contributors: Clinton E. Arnold (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen), General Editor S. M. Baugh (Ph.D., University of California, Irvine) Peter H. Davids (Ph.D., University of Manchester) David E. Garland (Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) David W. J. Gill (D.Phil., University of Oxford) George H. Guthrie (Ph.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) Moyer V. Hubbard (D.Phil., University of Oxford) Andreas J. Köstenberger (Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) Ralph P. Martin (Ph.D., University of London, King’s College) Douglas J. Moo (Ph.D., University of St. Andrews) Mark L. Strauss (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen) Frank Thielman (Ph.D., Duke University) Jeffrey A. D. Weima (Ph.D., University of Toronto) Michael J. Wilkins (Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary) Mark W. Wilson (D.Litt. et Phil., University of South Africa) Julie L. Wu (Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary) Robert W. Yarbrough (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen)

Colossians, Philemon

Colossians, Philemon

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation.This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence.The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology.These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship.

Colossians, Philemon

Colossians, Philemon

Most Bible commentaries take us on a one-way trip from the twentieth century to the first century. But they leave us there, assuming that we can somehow make the return journey on our own. In other words, they focus on the original meaning of the passage but don't discuss its contemporary application. The information they offer is valuable -- but the job is only half done! The NIV Application Commentary Series helps us with both halves of the interpretive task. This new and unique series shows readers how to bring an ancient message into a modern context. It explains not only what the Bible meant but also how it can speak powerfully today.

The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon

The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon

In this volume in the celebrated New International Greek Testament Commentary series, James D. G. Dunn, author of numerous well-received works on the historical origin and theological interpretation of the New Testament, provides detailed expositions of the text of Paul s letters to the Colossians and to Philemon. Dunn examines each of these letters within the context of the Jewish and Hellenistic cultures in the first century, and he discusses the place of Colossians and Philemon in the relationship between the Pauline mission and the early churches that received these letters. He places particular stress on the role of faith in Jesus Christ within and over against Judaism and on the counsel of these two important letters with regard to the shaping of human relationships in the community of faith.

The Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon

The Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon

Using the same brilliant exegesis and sound practical insight found in his previous work, Douglas J. Moo here not only accurately explains the meaning of the Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon, but also applies that meaning to twenty-first-century readers. Moo introduces each book with a series of five similar questions: To whom was it written? Who wrote it? When? Why? and What? He then divides the commentary itself into Letter Opening, Letter Body, and Letter Closing for each book, addressing the introductory thanksgiving of Philemon as well. The volume ends with thorough indexes of names, subjects, scripture references, and extrabiblical literature. Informed, methodologically astute, evangelical, and displaying a careful balance between good scholarship and pastoral concern, The Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon is readily accessible, offering something for everyone -- teacher or student, pastor or parishioner, scholar or layperson.

Colossians/Philemon

Colossians/Philemon

In Colossians and Philemon, two short but important letters of Paul, the gospel message is applied to Christians' everyday problems. Colossians/Philemon: New Life in Christ in an excellent way to introduce people to the letters of Paul while demonstrating the relevancy of Paul's message for people today. A Guided Discovery of the Bible The Bible invites us to explore God s word and reflect on how we might respond to it. To do this, we need guidance and the right tools for discovery. The Six Weeks with the Bible series of Bible discussion guides offers both in a concise six-week format. Whether focusing on a specific biblical book or exploring a theme that runs throughout the Bible, these practical guides in this series provide meaningful insights that explain Scripture while helping readers make connections to their own lives. Each guide is faithful to Church teaching and is guided by sound biblical scholarship presents the insights of Church fathers and saints includes questions for discussion and reflection delivers information in a reader-friendly format gives suggestions for prayer that help readers respond to God s word appeals to beginners as well as to advanced students of the Bible By reading Scripture, reflecting on its deeper meanings, and incorporating it into our daily life, we can grow not only in our understanding of God s word, but also in our relationship with God."

The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians

The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians

F.F. Bruce's study of the Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians constitute a single volume in The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Prepared by some of the world's leading scholars, the series provides an exposition of the New Testament books that is thorough and scholarly while faithful to the infallible Word of God.

Colossians and Philemon

A Commentary on the Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon

Colossians and Philemon

Lohse gives the reader solid interpretation and access to other scholars' efforts.

Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

One in an ongoing series of esteemed and popular Bible commentary volumes based on the New International Version text.

Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

Philippians, Colossians, Philemon

Philippians lends itself to a political-ideological reading. To take into account that the document is a writing from prison, and to read it from a political-religious and feminist perspective using new language, helps to re-create the letter as if it were a new document. In this analysis Elsa Tamez endeavors to utilize non-patriarchal, inclusive language, which helps us to see the contents of the letter with different eyes. Cynthia Briggs Kittredge and Claire Miller Colombo argue that Colossians’s contradictions and complications provide opportunities for entering imaginatively into the world of first-century Christian women and men. Rather than try to resolve the controversial portions—including the household code—they read the letter’s tensions as evidence of lively conversation around key theological, spiritual, and social issues of the time. Taking into account historical, structural, and rhetorical dimensions of Philemon, Alicia J. Batten argues against the “runaway slave” hypothesis that has so dominated the interpretation of this letter. Paul asks that Onesimus be treated well, but the commentary takes seriously the fact that we never hear what Onesimus’s wishes may have been. Slaves throughout history have had similar experiences, as have many women. Like Onesimus, their lives and futures remain in the hands of others, whether those others seek good or ill.