Consuming Higher Education

Analysing Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education, Paul Ashwin The Consumer Experience of Higher Education, Deirdre McArdle-Clinton Developing Student Criticality in Higher Education, Brenda Johnston, Rosamond Mitchell, ...

Consuming Higher Education

Reflects on the link between constructing students as consumers and the purpose of higher education, and the implications for student identity and learning.

Consuming Higher Education

Consuming Higher Education explores the status of students within the university and society, and the funding and purpose of higher education, drawing on empirical data, UK and USA government policy documents, speeches by policy makers and ...

Consuming Higher Education


Business Practices in Higher Education

Non-rivalry means that one person's consumption does not keep others from consuming it, and non-exclusion means that there is no feasible way to exclude or deprive anyone from its benefits” (p. 101). Higher education qualifies as ...

Business Practices in Higher Education

Business Practices in Higher Education is a breakthrough guide offering higher education and student affairs professionals an understanding of the fundamental business nature of colleges and universities. The author discusses the practical applications of business concepts and models and how these applications can contribute to the overall efficiency and effectiveness of higher education institutions. Useful examples from a wide range of institutions—including small privates, large publics, and community colleges—illustrate these concepts. This professional guide is organized into the following four sections: Environment and Structure Finance and Funding People and Processes Perspectives on the Future Business practices pervade the academic, student affairs, and administrative sides of higher education. This book affords readers a greater understanding of the true nature of higher education and an appreciation for how the academy effectively incorporates business practices into everyday work lives.

Constructing the Higher Education Student

Williams, J. (2011) 'Constructing consumption', in M. Molesworth, R. Scullion and E. Nixon (eds) The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, London: Routledge, pp 170–182. Williams, J. (2013) Consuming Higher ...

Constructing the Higher Education Student

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence. Amid debates about the future of both higher education and Europeanisation, this book is the first full-length exploration of how Europe’s 35 million students are understood by key social actors across different nations. The various chapters compare and contrast conceptualisations in six nations, held by policymakers, higher education staff, media and students themselves. With an emphasis on students’ lived experiences, the authors provide new perspectives about how students are understood, and the extent to which European higher education is homogenising. They explore various prominent constructions of students – including as citizens, enthusiastic learners, future workers and objects of criticism.

Higher Education and the Student

The Future Funding of Higher Education.” Higher Education Quarterly ... “Why Did They Do It? The Conservatives and Mass Higher Education, 1979–97. ... “Constructing Consumption: What Media Representations Reveal about Today's Students.

Higher Education and the Student

As one of the pioneers and leading advocates of neoliberalism, Britain, and in particular England, has radically transformed its higher education system over the last decades. Universities have increasingly been required to act like businesses, and students are frequently referred to as customers nowadays. Higher Education and the Student investigates precisely this relation between the changing function of higher education and what we consider the term ‘student’ to stand for. Based on a detailed analysis of government papers, reports, and speeches as well as publications by academics and students, the book explores how the student has been conceptualised within the debate on higher education from the birth of the British welfare state in the 1940s until today. It thus offers a novel assessment of the history of higher education and shows how closely the concept of the student and the way we comprehend higher education are intertwined. Higher Education and the Student opens up a new perspective that can critically inform public debate and future policy – in Britain and beyond. The book should be of great interest to scholars, researchers, and postgraduate students in the fields of higher education; educational policy and politics; and the philosophy, sociology, and history of higher education.

Encouraging Diversity in Higher Education

Examining the role of pedagogy in higher education retention', Journal of Further and Higher Education 35(2): 183–199. Rogers, I.H. (2012) The Black ... Williams, J. (2012) Consuming Higher Education. Why Learning Can't Be Bought, ...

Encouraging Diversity in Higher Education

Encouraging Diversity in Higher Education: Supporting Student Success provides an overview of the widening participation movement in Higher Education in the United Kingdom, United States, Australia and New Zealand. It argues that universities should revitalise their learning and teaching practices to better meet the diverse learning needs of contemporary undergraduate students. Approachable in execution, this book provides an evidence-based set of classroom practices, which readers will readily be able to relate to and use successfully. Answering questions such as: • How can I enrich my undergraduate teaching? • How can I help undergraduate students engage fully with their learning? • How can help undergraduate students to quickly acclimatise to Higher Education? • How can I help undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds excel at university? This book discusses economic and discursive drivers used to increase the numbers of undergraduate students who were the first in their families to enter university, and some of the ways in which universities responded to the growing percentage of such students. In so doing, it considers the learning needs of diverse students, and discusses the views of academic teaching staff who have used transparent pedagogies in their classrooms. Including forty five teaching strategies designed to generate highly engaged, socially inclusive classrooms, this is the first book to offer both a theoretical background of the need to approach learning and teaching in contemporary universities in innovative ways, and a practical, step by step guide to using a suite of transparent pedagogies. These focus on building inclusive classroom communities, generating academic literacies, developing collaborative learning skills, and encouraging students to think critically. This book will be a useful companion for both early career academics and those with experience but dealing with a new student cohort. It will also be of great interest to those teaching or studying the many professional qualifications in tertiary education. Kate Hughes is the President of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA) and Senior Consultant of Teaching and Learning at the Australian Catholic University. She is the co-author of Australian Sociology: A Changing Society, the market leading undergraduate text in Australia, now in its fourth edition.

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education

Identifying the professional values associated with teaching in higher education. ... The marketization of English higher education and the financing of tuition fees. ... Consuming higher education: Why learning can't be bought.

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education

This volume explores different angles of sustainability, university corporate social responsibility, and the role of civil society in the context of education, with a focus on curriculum development and teaching.

Dimensions of Marketisation in Higher Education

McCaig, C. (2011) Trajectories of higher education system differentiation: structural policy-making and the impact of tuition fees in ... London: Sage Williams, J. (2012) Consuming Higher Education: Why Learning Can't Be Bought .

Dimensions of Marketisation in Higher Education

Dimensions of Marketisation in Higher Education is a critical analysis of the various dimensions of marketisation in a global context, exploring governance, policy, financial, ethical and pedagogical aspects. Bringing together a selection of influential authors who draw on the work of Roger Brown, the book is a timely examination of the impact that policies regulating cost, entry and practices in higher education can have on universities, students and academics. This book explores the tensions and dilemmas marketisation brings into the educational environment for academic leaders, managers and students, arguing that they can be managed through rebalancing the relation between the market and the educational dimensions. Key topics include: The economics of higher education Students in a marketised environment Regulating a marketised sector Marketisation and higher education pedagogies Universities’ futures. Unveiling nuanced and multifaceted perspectives and providing readers with collective and forward-thinking critical analyses, Dimensions of Marketisation in Higher Education will be an authoritative reference book on policy and practice, appealing to higher education leaders, managers and scholars worldwide.

Women s Status in Higher Education Equity Matters

Women in higher education: A feminist perspective (2nd ed.). ... In E. J. Allan, S. V. Iverson, and R. Ropers-Huilman (Eds.), Reconstructingpolicy in higher education: Feminist ... Consuming higher education: Who is paying the price?

Women s Status in Higher Education  Equity Matters


Everything for Sale The Marketisation of UK Higher Education

Parker (Eds.)TheNew Higher Education: Issues and Directions forthe PostDearing University(pp.65–82). StokeonTrent: Staffordshire University ... Williams,J.(2012) Consuming HigherEducation: Why Learning Can't Be Bought London: Continuum.

Everything for Sale  The Marketisation of UK Higher Education

The marketisation of higher education is a growing worldwide trend. Increasingly, market steering is replacing or supplementing government steering. Tuition fees are being introduced or increased, usually at the expense of state grants to institutions. Grants for student support are being replaced or supplemented by loans. Commercial rankings and league tables to guide student choice are proliferating with institutions devoting increasing resources to marketing, branding and customer service. The UK is a particularly good example of this, not only because it is a country where marketisation has arguably proceeded furthest, but also because of the variations that exist as Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland increasingly diverge from England. In Everything for Sale, Roger Brown argues that the competitive regime that is now applicable to our Higher Education system was the logical, and possibly inevitable, outcome of a process that began with the introduction of full cost fees for overseas students in 1980. Through chapters including: Markets and Non-Markets The Institutional Pattern of Provision The Funding of Research The Funding of Student Education Quality Assurance The Impact of Marketisation: Efficiency, diversity and equity; He shows how the evaluation and funding of research, the funding of student education, quality assurance, and the structure of the system have increasingly been organised on market or quasi-market lines. As well as helping to explain the evolution of British higher education over the past thirty years, the book contains some important messages about the consequences of introducing or extending market competition in universities’ core activities of teaching and research. This timely and comprehensive book is essential reading for all academics at University level and anyone involved in Higher Education policy.

Resources in Education

( NB ) ED 336 705 CG 023 681 Skacel , Robert K. , Jr. Merritt , Rebecca Davis Gender Effects in College Students ' Drinking Habits and Their Perceptions of Intoxication of Others . Pub Date - May 91 Note - 24p .; Paper presented at the ...

Resources in Education


Beverage Consumption Habits around the World Association with Total Water and Energy Intakes

education. An association between higher education and healthier diets has been found in several studies [27,28,33]. The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may have been underestimated in the present study due to the high ...

Beverage Consumption Habits around the World  Association with Total Water and Energy Intakes

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Beverage Consumption Habits around the World: Association with Total Water and Energy Intakes" that was published in Nutrients

Higher Education Management and Policy

Journal of the Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education. consuming it . Thus , none of the product would be supplied , and the market would fail ( Begg , 2003 , p . 232 ) . To put it another way : if one individual ...

Higher Education Management and Policy


The End of Knowledge in Higher Education

Just as the consumer can accept or reject goods available on the market , secure in the rule that the customer is always right , so the consuming ' student can reject the knowledge and expertise higher education has to offer at will ...

The End of Knowledge in Higher Education

This study questions whether it is possible to identify a justified, secure and coherent base for our knowledge of the world and of ourselves. Science no longer enjoys an unquestioned pre-eminence in providing objective knowledge, and the social improvement brought about through rational thought has been recently attacked by postmodernism. Higher education is therefore placed in a precarious position, based as it is on the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. This book explores the various dimensions of this crisis of confidence in science and higher education, showing how thinkers in the various disciplines are reacting to this challenge, and how they are re-evaluating the basis of their forms of enquiry.

Planning for higher education

Also , the number of Core study students who reported at least one occasion of heavy drinking ( i.e. , consumption of 5 or more drinks in a row ) in the prior two weeks in 1991 ( 41.8 percent ) is down from a high of 45 percent of ...

Planning for higher education


Higher Education Abstracts Fall 1991 Volume 27 Number 1

By gender , the men were more likely to prefer drinking alone , after work , after a date , after a party , and after other forms of socializing , whereas ... Journal of College and University Student Housing , 1990 , 20 ( Winter ) pp .

Higher Education Abstracts  Fall 1991  Volume 27  Number 1


The Economic Institutions of Higher Education

Economic Theories of University Behaviour J. Patrick Raines, Charles G. Leathers ... But those who are involved in financing , producing , and consuming university education do not behave as if the universities are ' public dependencies ...

The Economic Institutions of Higher Education

Working within the context of the evolutionary-institutional transformation of higher education, this work traces the development of an economic model by which the behavioural tendencies of modern universities can be evaluated. That model is expanded to provide insights to the following questions: why do universities compete and how do they develop and implement their competitive strategies? How do universities make critical institutional decisions about operational missions, academic policies, and internal resource allocation? Do universities efficiently and effectively pursue the special social functions assigned to them? universities and provide a realistic economic model that predicts how universities allocate their scarce educational resources. This alternative view is contrasted with the mainstream explanations of university behaviour based on the maximization of student welfare of faculty influences. The authors extend the existing literature on the operation of universities by presenting a history of the evolution of the modern entrepreneurial universities as well as an explanation of academic capitalism.

The McDonaldization of Higher Education

He points to several trends evident in U.S. and British higher - education institutions . ( 1 ) Students increasingly perceive education as a commodity for consumption . The student as consumer seeks choice , " edutainment , " and a ...

The McDonaldization of Higher Education

There are many books on the changing world of higher education and many discussing "McDonaldization." This book is the first to bring both discussions together.

The Uneasy Public Policy Triangle in Higher Education

they decide what goods to consume . Paradoxically , higher education ( or its equivalent ) is a prerequisite to satisfying the free market standard of measuring value by consumers ' willingness to pay . High school students have very ...

The Uneasy Public Policy Triangle in Higher Education


Higher Education Abstracts

The most time - consuming activity was college - wide and departmental assignments followed distantly by curriculum development . Their least time - consuming activities were research and scholarly writing .

Higher Education Abstracts