Conversations with James Salter

Jennifer Levasseur, Kevin Rabalais. Conversations with James Salter Literary Conversations Series Monika Gehlawat General Editor Conversations with James Salter Edited by Jennifer Levasseur and Kevin.

Conversations with James Salter

James Salter (1925-2015) has been known throughout his career as a writer's writer, acclaimed by such literary greats as Susan Sontag, Richard Ford, John Banville, and Peter Matthiessen for his lyrical prose, his insightful and daring explorations of sex, and his examinations of the inner lives of women and men. Conversations with James Salter collects interviews published from 1972 to 2014 with the award-winning author of The Hunters, A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years, and All That Is. Gathered here are his earliest interviews following acclaimed but moderately selling novels, conversations covering his work as a screenwriter and award-winning director, and interviews charting his explosive popularity after publishing All That Is, his first novel after a gap of thirty-four years. These conversations chart Salter's progression as a writer, his love affair with France, his military past as a fighter pilot, and his lyrical explorations of gender relations. The collection contains interviews from Sweden, France, and Argentina appearing for the first time in English. Included as well are published conversations from the United States, Canada, and Australia, some of which are significantly extended versions, giving this collection an international scope of Salter's wide-ranging career and his place in world literature.

Freak Kingdom

literary career”: In 1970 Salter was working on short stories and screenplays. The year before he'd directed the film Three, starring Charlotte Rampling and Sam Waterston. Conversations with James Salter, loc. 232.

Freak Kingdom

The story of Hunter S. Thompson's crusade against Richard Nixon and the threat of fascism in America--and the devastating price he paid for it Hunter S. Thompson is often misremembered as a wise-cracking, drug-addled cartoon character. This book reclaims him for what he truly was: a fearless opponent of corruption and fascism, one who sacrificed his future well-being to fight against it, rewriting the rules of journalism and political satire in the process. This skillfully told and dramatic story shows how Thompson saw through Richard Nixon's treacherous populism and embarked on a life-defining campaign to stop it. In his fevered effort to expose institutional injustice, Thompson pushed himself far beyond his natural limits, sustained by drugs, mania, and little else. For ten years, he cast aside his old ambitions, troubled his family, and likely hastened his own decline, along the way producing some of the best political writing in our history. This timely biography recalls a period of anger and derangement in American politics, and one writer with the guts to tell the truth.

Conversations with Andre Dubus

No writers since James Salter and Peter Handke have taken me over this way. But Andre Dubus is different from those novelists—he comes unannounced. No one I talk to knows him. Of my literary friends, only two have read him.

Conversations with Andre Dubus

Over three decades, celebrated fiction writer Andre Dubus (1936-1999) published seven collections of short stories, two collections of essays, two collections of previously published stories, two novels, and a novella. While this is an impressive publishing record for any writer, for Dubus, who suffered a near-fatal accident mid-career, it is near miraculous. Just after midnight on July 23, 1986, after stopping to assist two stranded motorists, Dubus was struck by a car. His right leg was crushed and his left leg had to be amputated above the knee. After months of hospital stays and surgeries, he would suffer chronic pain for the rest of his life. However, when he gave his first interview after the accident, his deepest fear was that he would never write again. This collection of interviews traces his career beginning in 1967 with the publication of his novel The Lieutenant, to his final interview given right before his death February 24, 1999. In between are conversations that focus on his shift to essay writing during his long recovery period as well as those that celebrate his return to fiction with the publication of "The Colonel's Wife," in 1993. Dubus would share as well stories surrounding his Louisiana childhood, his three marriages, the writers who influenced him, and his deep Catholic faith.

The Art of Conversation

Novelist James Salter mischievously downplayed his inclusion in critic Harold Bloom's hitlist, The Western Canon: The question is: ... was a statusgrabbing act, claiming a literary title for himself as much as his vulgar native tongue.

The Art of Conversation

Every day we use our mobiles and computers to communicate, but ironically we are losing touch with face-to-face talk. Catherine Blyth reveals the endless possibilities of conversation and shows that when it works it can come close to heaven. With examples from Elizabeth I to Tommy Cooper, courtesans to nomads, The Art of Conversation is full of tips on listening, the perfect handshake, talking shop and surviving conversational bores. Be it sharing a joke with a stranger, sparking a new idea or just letting off steam with a friend, there are infinite adventures to be had if you break the ice and say hello . . .

Browsings A Year of Reading Collecting and Living with Books

... between novelist James Salter and literary journalist Robert Phelps. Don't miss the introduction. These days, The Paris Review has repackaged its longrunning series of conversations with authors, and even made them available online.

Browsings  A Year of Reading  Collecting  and Living with Books

From Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Michael Dirda comes a collection of his most personal and engaging essays on the literary life—the perfect companion for any lover of books. Michael Dirda has been hailed as "the best-read person in America" (The Paris Review) and "the best book critic in America" (The New York Observer). In addition to the Pulitzer Prize he was awarded for his reviews in The Washington Post, he picked up an Edgar from the Mystery Writers of America for his most recent book, On Conan Doyle. Dirda's latest volume collects fifty of his witty and wide-ranging reflections on literary journalism, book collecting, and the writers he loves. Reaching from the classics to the post-moderns, his allusions dance from Samuel Johnson, Ralph Waldo Emerson and M. F. K. Fisher to Marilynne Robinson, Hunter S. Thompson, and David Foster Wallace. Dirda's topics are equally diverse: literary pets, the lost art of cursive writing, book inscriptions, the pleasures of science fiction conventions, author photographs, novelists in old age, Oberlin College, a year in Marseille, writer's block, and much more, not to overlook a few rants about Washington life and American culture. As admirers of his earlier books will expect, there are annotated lists galore—of perfect book titles, great adventure novels, favorite words, essential books about books, and beloved children's classics, as well as a revealing peek at the titles Michael keeps on his own nightstand. Funny and erudite, occasionally poignant or angry, Browsings is a celebration of the reading life, a fan's notes, and the perfect gift for any booklover.

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature

As his literary career developed, Franklin would realize how valuable such pieces of common sense could be. ... James Salter, after leaving Sloane's employ, had established Don Saltero's Coffeehouse in Chelsea, which Franklin also ...

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature

The Oxford Handbook of Early American Literature is a major new reference work that provides the best single-volume source of original scholarship on early American literature. Comprised of twenty-seven chapters written by experts in their fields, this work presents an authoritative, in-depth, and up-to-date assessment of a crucial area within literary studies. Organized primarily in terms of genre, the chapters include original research on key concepts, as well as analysis of interesting texts from throughout colonial America. Separate chapters are devoted to literary genres of great importance at the time of their composition that have been neglected in recent decades, such as histories, promotion literature, and scientific writing. New interpretations are offered on the works of Benjamin Franklin, Jonathan Edwards and Dr. Alexander Hamilton while lesser known figures are also brought to light. Newly vital areas like print culture and natural history are given full treatment. As with other Oxford Handbooks, the contributors cover the field in a comprehensive yet accessible way that is suitable for those wishing to gain a good working knowledge of an area of study and where it's headed.

Literary Alchemist

Salter and Connell had a mutual admiration if not a close friendship. Katie Roiphe quoted that line from Salter's Burning the Days in a book about writers facing death, The Violet Hour. She was lucky to have had a conversation with ...

Literary Alchemist

Evan S. Connell (1924–2013) emerged from the American Midwest determined to become a writer. He eventually made his mark with attention-getting fiction and deep explorations into history. His linked novels Mrs. Bridge (1959) and Mr. Bridge (1969) paint a devastating portrait of the lives of a prosperous suburban family not unlike his own that, more than a half century later, continue to haunt readers with their minimalist elegance and muted satire. As an essayist and historian, Connell produced a wide range of work, including a sumptuous body of travel writing, a bestselling epic account of Custer at the Little Bighorn, and a singular series of meditations on history and the human tragedy. This first portrait and appraisal of an under-recognized American writer is based on personal accounts by friends, relatives, writers, and others who knew him; extensive correspondence in library archives; and insightful literary and cultural analysis of Connell’s work and its context. It reveals a tender and multidimensional representation of a 20th-century literary master worthy of broader attention.

Soldiers Once and Still

Ernest Hemingway, James Salter, and Tim O'Brien Alex Vernon. autobiographical book, one that “might be ... “To talk about literature with a grad you might as well be talking about molecular biology.” He recalled meeting a superintendent ...

Soldiers Once and Still

As the world enters a new century, as it embarks on new wars and sees new developments in the waging of war, reconsiderations of the last century’s legacy of warfare are necessary to our understanding of the current world order. In Soldiers Once and Still, Alex Vernon looks back through the twentieth century in order to confront issues of self and community in veterans’ literature, exploring how war and the military have shaped the identities of Ernest Hemingway, James Salter, and Tim O’Brien, three of the twentieth century’s most respected authors. Vernon specifically explores the various ways war and the military, through both cultural and personal experience, have affected social and gender identities and dynamics in each author’s work. Hemingway, Salter, and O’Brien form the core of Soldiers Once and Still because each represents a different warring generation of twentieth-century America: World War I with Hemingway, World War II and Korea with Salter, and Vietnam with O’Brien. Each author also represents a different literary voice of the twentieth century, from modern to mid-century to postmodern, and each presents a different battlefield experience: Hemingway as noncombatant, Salter as air force fighter pilot, and O’Brien as army grunt. War’s pervasive influence on the individual means that, for veterans-turned-writers like Hemingway, Salter, and O’Brien, the war experience infiltrates their entire body of writing—their works can be seen not only as war literature but also as veterans’ literature. As such, their entire postwar oeuvre, regardless of whether an individual work explicitly addresses the war or the military, is open to Vernon’s exploration of war, society, gender, and literary history. Vernon’s own experiences as a soldier, a veteran, a writer, and a critic inform this enlightening critique of American literature, offering students and scholars of American literature and war studies an invaluable tool for understanding war’s effects on the veteran writer and his society.

American Writers

A Collection of Literary Biographies Leonard Unger, A. Walton Litz, Molly Weigel, Lea Bechler, Jay Parini ... New York Times , January 5 , 2001 , INTERVIEWS p . B45 . . Bourjaily , Vance . ... Telephone conversation with James Salter .

American Writers

The four volume set consists of ninety-seven of the pamphlets originally published as the University of Minnesota pamphlets on American writers. Some have been revised and updated.

The Poetical Decameron Or Ten Conversations on English Poets and Poetry

Particularly of the Reigns of Elizabeth and James I. John Payne Collier ... Salter his contention between three bretheren , that is to say the Whoremonger , the Dronkard and the Dyce player . b . ... Stephen Gosson NINTH CONVERSATION .

The Poetical Decameron  Or  Ten Conversations on English Poets and Poetry


Selves

Imanaged MANY Saul Bellow, gossipy to insert I bits exchanged that evening one literary question. ... research,” and James Salter wrote about another writer's “keen appetite forgossip, without which most conversation is flavorless.

Selves

Selves is the first independent Creative Nonfiction anthology from Africa. Selves: An Afro Anthology of Creative Nonfiction features twenty-four writings by African Writers which speak from a passionate place, unafraid of the consequences, revealing even to the point of shame, essays that pry open personal Pandora boxes, revealing the secrets imprisoned beyond mental bars. Essays that hold the potential for personal healing even as personal hurts are replayed on the pages.

Writing on the Edge

Happily , the record of my conversations with these writers are in print ( back issues still available ) , but I have , in my literary life , had other memorable conversations with writers that were , like most conversations , not taped ...

Writing on the Edge


WOE

I of course chose writers whose work I admired , so getting to sit down and talk with them for an hour or an hour - and ... share a bottle of Frank Kermode's wine ( a fine French Chardonnay ) , drink iced tea with James Salter , hot tea ...

WOE


Tikkun

He's written about Vladimir Nabokov , James Salter , and Leonardo da Vinci . ... Shop Talk : A Writer and His Colleagues and Their Work . ... testing the limits of what a public literary conversation should be . Shop Talk is an object ...

Tikkun


Reclaiming My Decade Lost in Scientology

Conversations at the Workshop tables leapt and smoked about me. ... It meant a lot when, in response to a second story, my firstsemester workshop leader James Salter said, “This is a huge improvement.” I knew it.

Reclaiming My Decade Lost in Scientology

"With its keen attention to the language and tactics of the church, Hall’s memoir is unique among the assortment of Scientology reports and exposés, offering insight into the certainties that its subjects gain." —The Nation In the secluded canyons of 1980s Hollywood, Sands Hall, a young woman from a literary family, strives to forge her own way as an artist. But instead, Hall finds herself increasingly drawn toward the certainty that Scientology appears to offer. Her time in the Church includes the secretive illness and death of its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, and the ascension of David Miscavige. In this compelling memoir, Hall reveals what drew her into the religion—with its intrigues and unique contemporary vision—and how she came to confront its darker sides and finally escape. "Some of the most penetrating, illuminating prose about how an educated and skeptical person could get so deeply into, and then struggle to escape, what everyone around her warned was a dangerous cult . . . brilliant." —The Underground Bunker "If it is Scientology's offer of a life with meaning that hauls her in . . . it is its approach to meaning that keeps her . . . Hall's fascination with this is palpable." —Camille Ralphs, The Times Literary Supplement

James Salter

During Salter's West Point days , he had read widely if not deeply in literature , a distinguishing trait in a school whose ... how to have leisure , love , food , and conversation , how to look at nakedness , architecture , streets .

James Salter

Offers a brief profile of the novelist, and discusses the themes and backgrounds of his major works

The Paris Review

10.00 44 Creeley and I. B. Singer Interviews ; James Salter , Diane di Prima . ... 10.00 78 Andrei Voznesensky Interview ; Voznesensky / Ginsberg Conversation ; Edie Sedgwick Memoir ; T. Coraghessan Boyle , Tom Disch , Odysseus Elytis .

The Paris Review

The latest issue of THE PARIS REVIEW features the art of poetry, including an interview with 1995 Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney. Cited by Robert Lowell as Ireland's greatest poet since Yeats, Heaney talks about Irish politics, terrorism, and the Oxford Chair of Poetry. Photos and illustrations throughout.

Educational Film video Locator of the Consortium of University Film Centers and R R Bowker

Performance shots are interspersed with scenes of Brown talking to children and young people about his own background . ... Swimming -JHCG AZU WLacU 16 mm JAMES SALTER color 30 min sd Provides a close look at the works and creative ...

Educational Film video Locator of the Consortium of University Film Centers and R R  Bowker