Corruption in America

By contrast, in 2010 the Supreme Court gave corporations the right to spend unlimited money to influence elections. Zephyr Teachout shows that Citizens United was both bad law and bad history.

Corruption in America

When Louis XVI gave Ben Franklin a diamond-encrusted snuffbox, the gift troubled Americans: it threatened to corrupt him by clouding his judgment. By contrast, in 2010 the Supreme Court gave corporations the right to spend unlimited money to influence elections. Zephyr Teachout shows that Citizens United was both bad law and bad history.

Corruption and Governmental Legitimacy

35. Sandel, What Money can't buy, http://tannerlectures.utah.edu/_documents/a- to-z/s/sandel00.pdf. 36. Corruption in America From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United, Zephyr Teachout, Harvard University Press, 2014. 37.

Corruption and Governmental Legitimacy

Corruption and Governmental Legitimacy analyzes “legal corruption,” the noncriminal acts of corruption that flourish in democratic nations. This book defines legal corruption and illustrates its corrosive effects. It also examines the possibilities and challenges of corrective legislation and anticorruption campaigns.

Corruption and Anticorruption in Modern China

Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United. Harvard: Harvard University Press. Thiessen, Marc A. “Crony Capitalism Exposed.” The Washington Post, November 14, 2011. Teachout, Zephyr. 2014.

Corruption and Anticorruption in Modern China

This collection examines corruption and abuses of power in China from the end of the imperial period to the present. The interdisciplinary group of contributors examines how the Chinese Communist Party has adapted to economic and social changes while continuing to control the law, state, and mass media.

Managed Speech

Buckley didn't canonize either corruption definition.104 The government in Citizens United pressed the ... a Plan to Stop It (2011); Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United (2014).

Managed Speech

"This book comprehensively explores and critiques how the current U.S. Supreme Court, under the leadership of Chief Justice John Roberts, has reshaped First Amendment free speech law. The book argues that the Roberts Court’s First Amendment decisions consistently conform to a version of expressive freedom that the author calls “managed speech,” providing limited protection for expressive autonomy while bolstering social and political stability. The book critiques managed speech and advocates a contrasting vision of constitutional speech protection called “dynamic diversity,” which aims to broaden the range of ideas and participants in public discussion. The book examines every one of the more than forty decisions about expressive freedom that the Supreme Court handed down between Chief Justice Roberts’ ascent in September 2005 and Justice Scalia’s death in February 2016. These decisions comprise one of the most important, controversial parts of the Roberts Court's record and legacy. The author explores key recurring debates in First Amendment law across three categories of free speech problems: regulations of private speech; restrictions on speech that involves government institutional subjects, government property, or government funding, which the author calls “government preserves”; and regulations of speech in the electoral process." -- Oxford Scholarship Online.

Independence Corrupted

Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United, Fordham University law professor Zephyr Teachout identifies not only the “responsiveness to citizens” as “democracy's greatest promise” but also the “barrier ...

Independence Corrupted

With experience as both a trial and appellate judge, Charles Benjamin Schudson knows the burdens on judges. With engaging candor, he takes readers behind the bench to probe judicial minds analyzing actual trials and sentencings—of abortion protesters, murderers, sex predators, white supremacists, and others. He takes us into chambers to hear judges forging appellate decisions about life and death, multimillion-dollar damages, and priceless civil rights. And, most significantly, he exposes the financial, political, personal, and professional pressures that threaten judicial ethics and independence. As political attacks on judges increase, Schudson calls for reforms to protect judicial independence and for vigilance to ensure justice for all. Independence Corrupted is invaluable for students and scholars, lawyers and judges, and all citizens concerned about the future of America's courts.

The U S Supreme Court and Contemporary Constitutional Law The Obama Era and Its Legacy

52 Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United 17-80 (2016). 53 Id. at 295. 54 The decisive question for my purposes here is the original meaning of the words “abridging the freedom of ...

The U S  Supreme Court and Contemporary Constitutional Law  The Obama Era and Its Legacy

Der Oberste Gerichtshof der USA hat gerade während der Regierungszeit Barack Obamas das amerikanische Verfassungsrecht durch mehrere wegweisende Urteile neu geprägt. Der vorliegende Band vereint Beiträge renommierter Verfassungsrechtler aus den USA und Europa, die die Entwicklungen während der Obama-Regierung und ihre anhaltende Bedeutung rekonstruieren, analysieren und erklären.

American Oligarchy

In the United States the percentage believing corruption endemic in government rose from 59 percent in 2006 to 79 percent ... has explained in her superb book Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United, ...

American Oligarchy

A permanent political class has emerged on a scale unprecedented in our nation 's history. Its self-dealing, nepotism, and corruption contribute to rising inequality. Its reach extends from the governing elite throughout nongovernmental institutions. Aside from constituting an oligarchy of prestige and power, it enables the creation of an aristocracy of massive inherited wealth that is accumulating immense political power. In a muckraking tour de force reminiscent of Lincoln Steffens, Upton Sinclair, and C. Wright Mills, American Oligarchy demonstrates the way the corrupt culture of the permanent political class extends down to the state and local level. Ron Formisano breaks down the ways this class creates economic inequality and how its own endemic corruption infects our entire society. Formisano delves into the work of not just politicians but lobbyists, consultants, appointed bureaucrats, pollsters, celebrity journalists, behind-the-scenes billionaires, and others. Their shameless pursuit of wealth and self-aggrandizement, often at taxpayer expense, rewards channeling the flow of income and wealth to elites. That inequality in turn has choked off social mobility and made a joke of meritocracy. As Formisano shows, these forces respond to the oligarchy 's power and compete to bask in the presence of the .01 percent. They also exacerbate the dangerous instability of an American democracy divided between extreme wealth and extreme poverty.

Unequal and Unrepresented

Political Inequality and the People's Voice in the New Gilded Age Kay Lehman Schlozman, Henry E. Brady, Sidney Verba ... corruption, see Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United ...

Unequal and Unrepresented

How American political participation is increasingly being shaped by citizens who wield more resources The Declaration of Independence proclaims equality as a foundational American value. However, Unequal and Unrepresented finds that political voice in America is not only unequal but also unrepresentative. Those who are well educated and affluent carry megaphones. The less privileged speak in a whisper. Relying on three decades of research and an enormous wealth of information about politically active individuals and organizations, Kay Schlozman, Henry Brady, and Sidney Verba offer a concise synthesis and update of their groundbreaking work on political participation. The authors consider the many ways that citizens in American democracy can influence public outcomes through political voice: by voting, getting involved in campaigns, communicating directly with public officials, participating online or offline, acting alone and in organizations, and investing their time and money. Socioeconomic imbalances characterize every form of political voice, but the advantage to the advantaged is especially pronounced when it comes to any form of political expression--for example, lobbying legislators or making campaign donations—that relies on money as an input. With those at the top of the ladder increasingly able to spend lavishly in politics, political action anchored in financial investment weighs ever more heavily in what public officials hear. Citing real-life examples and examining inequalities from multiple perspectives, Unequal and Unrepresented shows how disparities in political voice endanger American democracy today.

Corporations Are People Too

United States v. United Foods, 533 U.S. 405, 411 (2001). ... Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress—And a Plan to Stop It (2011); Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: from Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United (2016).

Corporations Are People Too

Why we’re better off treating corporations as people under the law—and making them behave like citizens Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court launched a heated debate when it ruled in Citizens United that corporations can claim the same free speech rights as humans. Should corporations be able to claim rights of free speech, religious conscience, and due process? Kent Greenfield provides an answer: Sometimes. With an analysis sure to challenge the assumptions of both progressives and conservatives, Greenfield explores corporations' claims to constitutional rights and the foundational conflicts about their obligations in society. He argues that a blanket opposition to corporate personhood is misguided, since it is consistent with both the purpose of corporations and the Constitution itself that corporations can claim rights at least some of the time. The problem with Citizens United is not that corporations have a right to speak, but for whom they speak. The solution is not to end corporate personhood but to require corporations to act more like citizens.

Jefferson s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational Purpose

most prominently granted legitimacy by the Supreme Court in its Citizens United (2010) decision, we need to mount critical ... 2012; Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United.

Jefferson   s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational Purpose

This book newly interprets the educational implications of Thomas Jefferson’s revolutionary thought. In an age where American democracy is imperilled and the civic purposes of schooling eviscerated, Burch turns to Jefferson to help bring to life the values and principles that must be recovered in order for Americans to transcend the narrow purposes of education prescribed by today’s neoliberal paradigm. The author argues that critical engagement with the most radical dimensions of Jefferson’s educational philosophy can establish a rational basis upon which to re-establish the civic purposes of public education. Bracketing the defining features of Jefferson's theory throughout each of the chapters, the author illuminates the deficiencies of the dominant educational paradigm, and charts a new path forward for its progressive renewal.

Issues for Debate in American Public Policy

Teachout, Zephyr, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United, Harvard University Press, 2014. A Fordham University law professor, who is running for a U.S. House seat in New York, offers an overview of ...

Issues for Debate in American Public Policy

This collection of non-partisan reports written by award-winning CQ Researcher journalists focuses on provocative current policy issues. As an annual publication that comes together just months before it goes to press, the volume is all new and as up-to-date as possible. And because it’s CQ Researcher, the policy reports are expertly researched and written, showing all sides of an issue. Chapters follow a consistent organization—exploring three issue questions, then offering background, current context, and a look ahead—and feature a pro/con debate box. All issues include a chronology, bibliography, photos, charts, and figures.

Toxic Masculinity Casino Capitalism and America s Favorite Card Game

Zephyr Teachout's Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United traces the change in attitude toward corruption in the United States. She notes that historically, corruption did “not just include blatant ...

Toxic Masculinity  Casino Capitalism  and America s Favorite Card Game

Poker is a centuries-old American game. Why has it become so popular in the twenty-first century? What does current interest in the game tell us about ourselves and some of our most pressing social issues? In this timely and thought-provoking book, Andrew Manno offers important insights into the intersection of gaming, gender, and capitalism that illuminate how the shift to a casino capitalist economy—combined with a culture of toxic masculinity—impacts workers and how it has led to the rise of populism in the United States that manifested in the 2016 election of Donald Trump.

The Social Construction of Global Corruption

Corruption in America: from Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United. Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press. The Bern Declaration. “The Infiltration of the UN System by Multinational Corporations.

The Social Construction of Global Corruption

This book offers new ways of thinking about corruption by examining the two distinct ways in which policy approaches and discourse on corruption developed in the UN and the OECD. One of these approaches extrapolated transnational bribery as the main form of corrupt practices and advocated a limited scope offense, while the other approach tackled the broader structure of the global economic system and advocated curbing the increasing power of multinational corporations. Developing nations, in particular Chile, initiated and contributed much to these early debates, but the US-sponsored issue of transnational bribery came to dominate the international agenda. In the process, the ‘corrupt corporation’ was supplanted by the ‘corrupt politician’, the ‘corrupt public official’ and their international counterpart: the ‘corrupt country’. This book sheds light on these processes and the way in which they reconfigured our understanding of the state as an economic actor and the multinational corporation as a political actor.

Money in American Politics An Encyclopedia

Finally, even applying or singularly focusing on quid pro quo corruption, the Court has also made it more difficult to prove it. In United States v. ... Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United.

Money in American Politics  An Encyclopedia

How much does money really matter in American politics? A first-of-its-kind reference book, this encyclopedia provides the most up-to-date research and analysis regarding how money affects American campaigns, elections, politics, and public policy. • Provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of money's key role in contemporary American campaigns, elections, law, and policymaking • Reviews current research that examines money's impact on politics • Explains the laws regarding money in U.S. politics and assesses the viability of various reforms and proposed regulations

At War with Corruption

Department of Justice, United States of America, hereinafter referred to as FBI, April 2, 1980, Price Archives. ... 1 Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United (Cambridge: Harvard ...

At War with Corruption

At War with Corruption began as a biography of Bill Price, the U.S. attorney and Republican candidate for high office who spearheaded prosecutions in the most pervasive public corruption spectacle in American history: the Oklahoma county commissioner scandal. Price’s determination to root out the rascals and restore faith in governance branded him as the biggest corruption buster in the state’s history. Price’s career in law and politics serves as a portal into corruption in Oklahoma. Episodes in that narrative include land swindles (soonerism) at the dawn of Oklahoma history; theft of Native Americans’ property and steamrolling of their cultures that reached a nadir in the Osage murders; the Supreme Court scandal of 1964–65; Leo Winters’ alleged misuse of state taxes (what was the treasurer doing with the people’s money?); Governor David Hall’s trial and conviction on charges of extortion; prosecutions of drug syndicates, Penn Square Bank insiders, and Oklahoma Corporation Commissioners on the take; and the systemic bribery in county governance that inspired this book. Price shatters the myth that Oklahomans have been uniquely tolerant of, and susceptible to, corruption. He blames structural flaws and inadequate legislation for tempting law-abiding citizens to heed the call of their darker angels. Although Price failed in his gubernatorial and congressional campaigns, he has influenced policy through philanthropies that set a high bar for civic engagement. At War with Corruption reveals the sinister side of human nature. Yet its intention is not to depress, but rather to uplift and to show what is possible when public servants work together to frame effective laws and promote justice.

Anticorruption

Corruption in America : From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United . Cambridge , MA : Harvard University Press , 2014 . * Uslaner , Eric M. Corruption , Inequality , and the Rule of Law : The Bulging Pocket Makes the Easy ...

Anticorruption

Winning the anticorruption battle: a guide for citizens and politicians. The phenomenon of corruption has existed since antiquity; from ancient Mesopotamia to our modern-day high-level ethical morass, people have sought a leg up, a shortcut, or an end run to power and influence. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, Robert Rotberg, a recognized authority on governance and international relations, offers a definitive guide to corruption and anticorruption, charting the evolution of corruption and offering recommendations on how to reduce its power and spread. The most important component of anticorruption efforts, he argues, is leadership that is committed to changing dominant political cultures. Rotberg explains that corruption is the conversion of a public good into personal gain—either by the exchange of cash for influence or by the granting of special favors even without explicit payments. He describes successful anticorruption efforts in countries ranging from Denmark and Sweden to Canada and Costa Rica, and discusses the roles of judicial systems, investigative journalism, multinational corporations, and technological advances. He shows how the United States has become more corrupt than before, and contrasts recent US and Canadian experiences. Without sufficient political will to eliminate corruption, it persists. Rotberg outlines thirteen practical steps for battling corruption, including removing holdover officials tainted by corruption and the public declaration of financial assets by elected officials and appointees.

The Oxford Handbook of Fiduciary Law

25 Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United 276–290 (2014). 26 This rooting of the anticorruption principle in fiduciary law is most explicit in Seth Barrett Tillman's engagement with ...

The Oxford Handbook of Fiduciary Law

The Oxford Handbook of Fiduciary Law provides a comprehensive overview of critical topics in fiduciary law and theory through chapters authored by leading scholars. The Handbook opens with surveys of the many fields of law in which fiduciary duties arise, including agency law, trust law, corporate law, pension law, bankruptcy law, family law, employment law, legal representation, health care, and international law. Drawing on these surveys, the Handbook offers a synthetic analysis of fiduciary law's key concepts and principles. Chapters in the Handbook explore the defining features of fiduciary relationships, clarify the distinctive fiduciary duties that arise in these relationships, and identify the remedies available for breach of fiduciary duties. The volume also provides numerous comparative perspectives on fiduciary law from eminent legal historians and from scholars with deep expertise in a diverse array of the world's legal systems. Finally, the Handbook lays the groundwork for future research on fiduciary law and theory by highlighting cross-cutting themes, identifying persistent theoretical and practical challenges, and exploring how the field could be enriched through empirical analysis and interdisciplinary insights from economics, philosophy, and psychology. Unparalleled in its breadth and depth of coverage, The Oxford Handbook of Fiduciary Law represents an invaluable resource for practitioners, policymakers, scholars, and students in this essential field of law.

The Corruption Cure

Derick W. Brinkerhoff, “Assessing Political Will for Anti-Corruption Efforts: An Analytic Framework,” Public Administration and ... Quoted in Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United ...

The Corruption Cure

Why leadership is key to ending political and corporate corruption globally Corruption corrodes all facets of the world's political and corporate life, yet until now there was no one book that explained how best to battle it. The Corruption Cure provides many of the required solutions and ranges widely across continents and diverse cultures—putting some thirty-five countries under an anticorruption microscope—to show exactly how to beat back the forces of sleaze and graft. Robert Rotberg defines corruption theoretically and practically in its many forms, describes the available legal remedies, and examines how we know and measure corruption's presence. He looks at successful and unsuccessful attempts to employ anticorruption investigative commissions to combat political theft and venal behavior. He explores how the globe's least corrupt nations reached that exceptional goal. Another chapter discusses the role of civil society in limiting corruption. Expressed political will through determined leadership is a key factor in winning all of these battles. Rotberg analyzes the best-performing noncorrupt states to show how consummate leadership made a telling difference. He demonstrates precisely how determined leaders changed their wildly corrupt countries into paragons of virtue, and how leadership is making a significant difference in stimulating political anticorruption movements in places like India, Croatia, Honduras, and Lebanon. Rotberg looks at corporate corruption and how it can be checked, and also offers an innovative fourteen-step plan for nations that are ready to end corruption. Curing rampant corruption globally requires strengthened political leadership and the willingness to remake national political cultures. Tougher laws and better prosecutions are not enough. This book enables us to rethink the problem completely—and solve it once and for all.

Captured

Zephyr Teachout, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014), 246. 35. Lee Drutman, “How Corporate Lobbyists Conquered American Democracy,” The Atlantic, ...

Captured

A leading member of the Senate Judiciary Committee "spells out, in considerable detail, the extent of corporate influence over a variety of issues" in national politics (The New Yorker) As a U.S. senator and former federal prosecutor, Sheldon Whitehouse has had a front-row seat for the spectacle of dark money in government. In his widely praised book Captured, he describes how corporations buy influence over our government— not only over representatives and senators, but over the very regulators directly responsible for enforcing the laws under which these corporations operate, and over the judges and prosecutors who are supposed to be vigilant about protecting the public interest. In a case study that shows these operations at work, Whitehouse reveals how fossil fuel companies have held any regulation related to climate change at bay. The problem is structural: as Kirkus Reviews wrote, "many of the ills it illuminates are bipartisan." This paperback edition features a new preface by the author that reveals how corporate influence has taken advantage of Donald Trump's presidency to advance its agenda—and what we can do about it.

Republic Lost

... “corruption”—from Buckley to Citizens United to McCutcheon—is that not one tries to explicate the meaning of the term for our Framers. Scholars have. Zephyr Teachout's book, Corruption in America: From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box ...

Republic  Lost

Harvard Law School professor Lawrence Lessig investigates the most vexing problem in American democracy: how money corrupts our nation's politics, and the critical campaign to stop it. In an era when special interests funnel huge amounts of money into our government-driven by shifts in campaign-finance rules and brought to new levels by the Supreme Court in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission-trust in our government has reached an all-time low. More than ever before, Americans believe that money buys results in Congress, and that business interests wield control over our legislature. With heartfelt urgency and a keen desire for righting wrongs, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig takes a clear-eyed look at how we arrived at this crisis: how fundamentally good people, with good intentions, have allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests, and how this exploitation has become entrenched in the system. Rejecting simple labels and reductive logic-and instead using examples that resonate as powerfully on the Right as on the Left-Lessig seeks out the root causes of our situation. He plumbs the issues of campaign financing and corporate lobbying, revealing the human faces and follies that have allowed corruption to take such a foothold in our system. He puts theissues in terms that nonwonks can understand, using real-world analogies and real human stories. And ultimately he calls for widespread mobilization and a new Constitutional Convention, presenting achievable solutions for regaining control of our corrupted-but redeemable-representational system. In this way, Lessig plots a roadmap for returning our republic to its intended greatness. While America may be divided, Lessig vividly champions the idea that we can succeed if we accept that corruption is our common enemy and that we must find a way to fight against it. In Republic Lost, he not only makes this need palpable and clear-he gives us the practical and intellectual tools to do something about it.