Conflict and Courage

Conflict and Courage


The Mystery of Courage

The Mystery of Courage

Few of us spend much time thinking about courage, but we know it when we see it--or do we? Is it best displayed by marching into danger, making the charge, or by resisting, enduring without complaint? Is it physical or moral, or both? Is it fearless, or does it involve subduing fear? Abner Small, a Civil War soldier, was puzzled by what he called the "mystery of bravery"; to him, courage and cowardice seemed strangely divorced from character and will. It is this mystery, just as puzzling in our day, that William Ian Miller unravels in this engrossing meditation. Miller culls sources as varied as soldiers' memoirs, heroic and romantic literature, and philosophical discussions to get to the heart of courage--and to expose its role in generating the central anxieties of masculinity and manhood. He probes the link between courage and fear, and explores the connection between bravery and seemingly related states: rashness, stubbornness, madness, cruelty, fury; pride and fear of disgrace; and the authority and experience that minimize fear. By turns witty and moving, inquisitive and critical, his inquiry takes us from ancient Greece to medieval Europe, to the American Civil War, to the Great War and Vietnam, with sidetrips to the schoolyard, the bedroom, and the restaurant. Whether consulting Aristotle or private soldiers, Miller elicits consistently compelling insights into a condition as endlessly interesting as it is elusive.

Courage

Courage

This timely book brings together ten scholars in the varied fields of philosophy, theology, history, anthropology, and literature to reflect on the theme of courage. Contributors to this volume agree that courage is not just for the few or the dramatically heroic. While some of the authors do invoke awe-inspiring instances of death-defying courage, all recognize that courage is required of every one of us. The first section of Courage, entitled "Courage in Philosophy and Literature," begins with William Desmond's exploration of the transcendent dimension of courage, which comes to us not from within ourselves but from beyond ourselves. Leroy Rouner's essay utilizes Paul Tillich's interpretation of faith as courage in The Courage to Be and then goes on to suggest that original sin be understood in today's terms as ontological loneliness. Remi Brague, following Nietzsche, finds that the virtue called for in modern times is intellectual honesty--the courage to face the truth. Geoffrey Hill's essay looks at depictions of courage in the writings of Shakespeare and his immediate predecessors. Philip Ivanhoe suggests that Aristotle's understanding of courage can be deepened by the writings of the Confucian thinker Mengzi (Mencius), who insisted that "great courage"--courage directed toward morally praiseworthy ends--is the result of a continuing process of self-cultivation. The second section, "Courage in War, Peace, and Nation Building," includes John Taylor's study of courage in wartime, which focuses particularly on Robert E. Lee and his courage. Daniel Berrigan's piece, on the other hand, finds in the famous Isaiah text "And they will hammer their swords into plowshares" a summons to peace making. Lucius Outlaw calls for courage from each of us in constructing a multiracial, multiethnic democracy with "justice for all." "Courage Every Day" is the theme of the final section. Robert Neville illuminates the many varieties of courage called for each day of our lives, including the courage to dare, the courage of self-identity, the courage to love, and the courage to be alone. Katherine Platt concludes these explorations of courage with the hope-inspiring suggestion that courage is a habit we can practice.

The Courage to Teach Guide for Reflection and Renewal

The Courage to Teach Guide for Reflection and Renewal

This guide is a welcome resource for those who wish to extend their exploration beyond just reading "The Courage to Teach," individually or within a study group. Includes a DVD featuring an interview with Parker Palmer discussing the crisis in education, the heart of a teacher, ways of knowing, and more.

The Red Badge of Courage and Other Stories

The Red Badge of Courage and Other Stories

Henry Fleming, a raw Union Army recruit in the American Civil War, is anxious to confirm his patriotism and manhood—to earn his “badge of courage.” But his dreams of heroism and invulnerability are soon shattered when he flees the Confederate enemy during his baptism of fire and then witnesses the horrible death of a friend. Plunged unwillingly into the nightmare of war, Fleming survives by sheer luck and instinct. This edition of Stephen Crane’s poignant classic is supplemented by five of his acclaimed short stories as well as selected poetry, offering the full range of this great American author’s extraordinary talent. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Psychological Courage

Psychological Courage

While the virtues of physical courage and moral courage have a long history in ethics, the courage to face personal psychological problems has never been fully integrated into the discipline. Psychological Courage explores the ethical dimension and multiple facets of the virtue of "psychological courage," as dubbed by author Daniel Putman. In this book, Putman outlines three forms of courage: physical, moral, and psychological. He defines psychological courage as the courage to face addictions, phobias, and obsessions, and to avoid self deception and admit mistakes. This book analyzes what psychological courage is and upholds it as a central virtue for human happiness.

The Red Badge of Courage

The Red Badge of Courage

With an Introduction and Notes by Lionel Kelly, University of Reading. Also included are two short stories: The Veteran * The Open Book The Red Badge of Courage is one of the greatest war novels of all time. It reports on the American Civil War through the eyes of Henry Fleming, an ordinary farm boy turned soldier. It evokes the chaos and the dull clatter of war: the acrid smoke, the incessant rumours of coming battles, the filth and cold, the numbing monotony, the unworldly wailing of the dying. Like an impressionist painter, Crane also captures the strange beauty of war: the brilliant red flags against a blue sky, steel bayonets flashing in the morning sun as soldiers step off into battle. In the midst of this chaotic outer world, he creates an intricate inner world as he takes us inside the head of Henry Fleming. Stephen Crane is now recognised as one of a handful of daring innovators who helped shape modern American fiction.

Plato and the Virtue of Courage

Plato and the Virtue of Courage

Chief among these is that, by facilitating the pursuit of wisdom, such courage can provide a crucial foundation for the courage most deserving of the name.

Mother Courage and Her Children

A Chronicle of the Thirty Years' War

Mother Courage and Her Children

Anna Fierling, an itinerant trader during the seventeenth century, becomes known as "Mother Courage" after the constant warfare gradually claims all of her children

Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Moral Courage

Motives and Designs for Ministry in a Troubled World

Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Moral Courage

According to the authors of this powerfully reasoned book, only a serious commitment to the Christian ideas of forgiveness and reconciliation can meet the needs of todaybs troubled world -- and the church must take the lead in this process. Partly a survey of existing attitudes and partly a how-to manual for developing an active bpublicb church, this book highlights the importance of forgiveness and reconciliation in both congregational life and society, and it traces out the intricacies of making it happen. After discussing common views of human nature and exploring the concepts of forgiveness and reconciliation as found in Scripture and church tradition, Robert Browning and Roy Reed put forth an innovative four-pronged approach integrating recent scientific studies of forgiveness with bold, theologically grounded ministry proposals.