Courting Justice

Courting Justice PAUL L. TRACTENBERG, EDITOR FOREWORD BY DEBORAH T. PORITZ RUTGERS UNIVERSITY PRESS NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY, AND LONDON LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOGING-IN-PUBLICATION DATA Courting justice : ten New.

Courting Justice

Since 1947 a modernized New Jersey Supreme Court has played an important and controversial role in the state, nation, and world. Its decisions in cutting-edge cases have confronted society’s toughest issues, reflecting changing social attitudes, modern life’s complexities, and new technologies. Paul Tractenberg has selected ten of the court’s landmark decisions between 1960 and 2011 to illustrate its extensive involvement in major public issues, and to assess its impact. Each case chapter is authored by a distinguished academic or professional expert, several of whom were deeply involved in the cases’ litigation, enabling them to provide special insights. An overview chapter provides context for the court’s distinctive activity. Many of the cases are so widely known that they have become part of the national conversation about law and policy. In the Karen Ann Quinlan decision, the court determined the right of privacy extends to refusing life-sustaining treatment. The Baby M case reined in surrogate parenting and focused on the child’s best interests. In the Mount Laurel decision, the court sought to increase affordable housing for low- and moderate-income residents throughout the state. The Megan’s Law case upheld legal regulation of sex offender community notification. A series of decisions known as Abbott/Robinson required the state to fund poor urban school districts at least on par with suburban districts. Other less well known cases still have great public importance. Henningsen v. Bloomfield Motors reshaped product liability and tort law to protect consumers injured by defective cars; State v. Hunt shielded privacy rights from unwarranted searches beyond federal standards; Lehmann v. Toys ‘R’ Us protected employees from sexual harassment and a hostile work environment; Right to Choose v. Byrne expanded state constitutional abortion rights beyond the federal constitution; and Marini v. Ireland protected low-income tenants against removal from their homes. For some observers, the New Jersey Supreme Court represents the worst of judicial activism; others laud it for being, in its words, “the designated last-resort guarantor of the Constitution's command.” For Tractenberg, the court’s activism means it tends to find for the less powerful over the more powerful and for the public good against private interests, an approach he applauds.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice

Winning a high-profile case has given a huge boost to New York attorney DeAngelo Di Meglio’s career—and his love life. Too bad fame hasn’t helped him win the woman he’s been infatuated with for years. Tired of waiting and wondering, Angelo books a trip to the singles-only Bahamas resort where Peyton Mahoney is celebrating her thirtieth birthday. And just as he hoped, when they finally connect, the chemistry is mind-blowing…. Two weeks in paradise has given Peyton some sizzling memories. That’s all she expects—or wants—from a legendary player like Angelo. Having grown up on Chicago’s South Side, she is worlds away from his life of privilege. Then a controversial case puts them on opposing sides. And as sexual tension spills over from the courtroom to the bedroom, there’s no way they can ignore the undeniable attraction…. Title originally published in 2012

Courting Justice

A triumph of investigative reporting, Courting Justice draws on interviews with justices' friends, relatives, and former clerks to offer an inside look at individual rulings and the often surprising context of those decisions.

Courting Justice

An in-depth analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court's struggle with gay rights goes behind the scenes of the various cases, from the 1958 victory of an obscure homosexual magazine to the 2000 defeat of a gay Eagle Scout, examining each ruling, the context and ramifications of each decision, and their relationship to the American gay rights movement. 25,000 first printing.

Courting Justice

... to commence an action for divorce . Wasserman got an emergency court order freezing the couple's assets in the United States , including bank accounts held in the name of Joey's wholly owned COURTING JUSTICE 65.

Courting Justice

A celebrated trial lawyer describes his life in the American legal system, detailing his youth in small-town Illinois, law school education, his courtroom battles in the media spotlight, his high-profile clients, and his thoughts on American law. 100,000 first printing.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice


Courting Justice

A triumph of investigative reporting, Courting Justice gives us an inspiring new perspective on the struggle for civil rights in America.

Courting Justice

Since 1958, twenty-five men and two women have forced the Supreme Court to consider whether the Constitution's promises of equal protection apply to gay Americans. Here Joyce Murdoch and Deb Price reveal how the nation's highest court has reacted to these cases--from the surprising 1958 victory of a tiny homosexual magazine to the 2000 defeat of a gay Eagle Scout. A triumph of investigative reporting, Courting Justice gives us an inspiring new perspective on the struggle for civil rights in America.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice


Law and Love in Ovid

The book is methodologically ambitious, combining legal theory with historically informed closed readings of numerous primary sources. Ziogas aims to restore Ovid to his rightful position in the history of legal humanism.

Law and Love in Ovid

In classical scholarship, the presence of legal language in love poetry is commonly interpreted as absurd and incongruous. Ovid's legalisms have been described as frivolous, humorous, and ornamental. Law and Love in Ovid challenges this wide-spread, but ill-informed view. Legal discourse in Latin love poetry is not incidental, but fundamental. Inspired by recent work in the interdisciplinary field of law and literature, Ioannis Ziogas argues that the Roman elegiac poets point to love as the site of law's emergence. The Latin elegiac poets may say 'make love, not law', but in order to make love, they have to make law. Drawing on Agamben, Foucault, and Butler, Law and Love in Ovid explores the juridico-discursive nature of Ovid's love poetry, constructions of sovereignty, imperialism, authority, biopolitics, and the ways in which poetic diction has the force of law. The book is methodologically ambitious, combining legal theory with historically informed closed readings of numerous primary sources. Ziogas aims to restore Ovid to his rightful position in the history of legal humanism. The Roman poet draws on a long tradition that goes back to Hesiod and Solon, in which poetic justice is pitted against corrupt rulers. Ovid's amatory jurisprudence is examined vis-à-vis Paul's letter to the Romans. The juridical nature of Ovid's poetry lies at the heart of his reception in the Middle Ages, from Boccaccio's Decameron to Forcadel's Cupido iurisperitus. The current trend to simultaneously study and marginalize legal discourse in Ovid is a modern construction that Law and Love in Ovid aims to demolish.

Gender and Judging

As Justice Yvonne Mokgoro observes in the documentary Courting Justice,1 during the hundreds of preceding years 'I guess there was no thought that women could also serve'. More accurately, what kept women off the bench was the firmly ...

Gender and Judging

Does gender make a difference to the way the judiciary works and should work? Or is gender-blindness a built-in prerequisite of judicial objectivity? If gender does make a difference, how might this be defined? These are the key questions posed in this collection of essays, by some 30 authors from the following countries; Argentina, Cambodia, Canada, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Ivory Coast, Japan, Kenya, the Netherlands, the Philippines, South Africa, Switzerland, Syria and the United States. The contributions draw on various theoretical approaches, including gender, feminist and sociological theories. The book's pressing topicality is underlined by the fact that well into the modern era male opposition to women's admission to, and progress within, the judicial profession has been largely based on the argument that their very gender programmes women to show empathy, partiality and gendered prejudice - in short essential qualities running directly counter to the need for judicial objectivity. It took until the last century for women to begin to break down such seemingly insurmountable barriers. And even now, there are a number of countries where even this first step is still waiting to happen. In all of them, there remains a more or less pronounced glass ceiling to women's judicial careers.

Courting Justice

Justin Forrester, a scrawny kid from the African bushveld finds tennis.

Courting Justice

Justin Forrester, a scrawny kid from the African bushveld finds tennis. Inspired by the greatest match of all time - Björn Borg's epic victory over John McEnroe at Wimbledon 1980 - and armed with a tennis racket and a dream, he travels the roller-coaster ride of the tennis circuit to pursue a single-minded quest to become the best tennis player in the world.Enter Boris Bauer, meticulously groomed into a tennis cyborg, product of a fiendish plot to satiate a ruthless megalomaniac's lust for wealth.Will justice on the courts prevail?

Courting Social Justice

This book is a first-of-its-kind, five-country empirical study of the causes and consequences of social and economic rights litigation.

Courting Social Justice

This book is a first-of-its-kind, five-country empirical study of the causes and consequences of social and economic rights litigation. Detailed studies of Brazil, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, and South Africa present systematic and nuanced accounts of court activity on social and economic rights in each country. The book develops new methodologies for analyzing the sources of and variation in social and economic rights litigation, explains why actors are now turning to the courts to enforce social and economic rights, measures the aggregate impact of litigation in each country, and assesses the relevance of the empirical findings for legal theory. This book argues that courts can advance social and economic rights under the right conditions precisely because they are never fully independent of political pressures.

Contemporary Authors

chatty history , ” a Publishers Weekly contributor added that Courting Justice " fills a gap in lesbian and gay studies and legal studies . " BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES : PERIODICALS America's First Gay Column Comes Out , is a ...

Contemporary Authors

A biographical and bibliographical guide to current writers in all fields including poetry, fiction and nonfiction, journalism, drama, television and movies. Information is provided by the authors themselves or drawn from published interviews, feature stories, book reviews and other materials provided by the authors/publishers.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice


Courting Justice

In Courting Justice, the sequel to Recusal, following the lives of Sydney and Jacob as they set out as a married couple commuting in California, Sydney as a law professor at Stanford, Jake a trial lawyer in a boutique firm in San Francisco, ...

Courting Justice

"Sydney Emerson and Jacob Lehman met at the U.S. Supreme Court where they worked for one year as clerks to two Justices. Together they dealt with issues of law and politics and media at the highest levels in Washington, DC, and while all that was happening, they fell in love. They were an unlikely couple, she a Californian, Stanford graduate and Rhodes scholar; he a Jersey boy from New York University Law School. They met and courted at the Supreme Court. In Courting Justice, the sequel to Recusal, following the lives of Sydney and Jacob as they set out as a married couple commuting in California, Sydney as a law professor at Stanford, Jake a trial lawyer in a boutique firm in San Francisco, where they would live"--

Courting Justice

COURTING JUSTICE The second book in the Montana Courthouse Tales Series An all-new collection of courtroom tales from an all-new set of Montana courthouses.

Courting Justice

COURTING JUSTICE The second book in the Montana Courthouse Tales Series An all-new collection of courtroom tales from an all-new set of Montana courthouses. True stories of murder and corruption, libel and sedition, justice and injustice - narrated by a cast of unforgettable historical, ghostly, and inanimate characters. • Missoula • Butte • Plentywood • Dillon • Thompson Falls • Stanford • Chinook • Broadus • Deer Lodge • Miles City • Boulder • Fort Benton • Round Up • Jordan

Courting Justice

The legal brief and its introduction provide compelling arguments that Iran must be held responsible for its support for global terrorism and that economic tools play a critical role in the America's efforts to combat Iran's violent and ...

Courting Justice

On January 13, 2016, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the landmark case, Bank Markazi v. Peterson. The case will decide whether American victims of Iranian terrorism are able to seize assets belonging to the Central Bank of Iran in order to collect on judgments won against the state. At stake: the U.S. government's ability to use the economic sanctions to combat the full range of Iranian illicit activities. The Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), a non-partisan, Washington, DC-based think tank, filed an amicus curiae brief analyzing the legal and constitutional principles of the case and explaining the broader foreign policy context. In an introduction to the brief, FDD Executive Director and noted Iran sanctions expert Mark Dubowitz explains that Iran is trying to use the American legal system to undercut the sanctions architecture developed over decades by the U.S. Congress and successive Republican and Democratic administrations. The legal brief and its introduction provide compelling arguments that Iran must be held responsible for its support for global terrorism and that economic tools play a critical role in the America's efforts to combat Iran's violent and destabilizing activities around the world.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice


American Original

Sandra Day O'Connor: How the First Woman on the Supreme Court Became Its Most Influential Justice. New York: HarperCollins, 2005. Boies, David. Courting Justice: From NY Yankees v. Major League Baseball to Bush v. Gore 1997–2000.

American Original

The first full-scale biography of the Supreme Court's most provocative—and influential—justice If the U.S. Supreme Court teaches us anything, it is that almost everything is open to interpretation. Almost. But what's inarguable is that, while the Court has witnessed a succession of larger-than-life jurists in its two-hundred-year-plus history, it has never seen the likes of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Combative yet captivating, infuriating yet charming, the outspoken jurist remains a source of curiosity to observers across the political spectrum and on both sides of the ideological divide. And after nearly a quarter century on the bench, Scalia may be at the apex of his power. Agree with him or not, Scalia is "the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about the law," as the Harvard law dean Elena Kagan, now U.S. Solicitor General, once put it. Scalia electrifies audiences: to hear him speak is to remember him; to read his writing is to find his phrases permanently affixed in one's mind. But for all his public grandstanding, Scalia has managed to elude biographers—until now. In American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the veteran Washington journalist Joan Biskupic presents for the first time a detailed portrait of this complicated figure and provides a comprehensive narrative that will engage Scalia's adherents and critics alike. Drawing on her long tenure covering the Court, and on unprecedented access to the justice, Biskupic delves into the circumstances of his rise and the formation of his rigorous approach to the bench. Beginning with the influence of Scalia's childhood in a first-generation Italian American home, American Original takes us through his formative years, his role in the Nixon-Ford administrations, and his trajectory through the Reagan revolution. Biskupic's careful reporting culminates with the tumult of the contemporary Supreme Court—where it was and where it's going, with Scalia helping to lead the charge. Even as Democrats control the current executive and legislative branches, the judicial branch remains rooted in conservatism. President Obama will likely appoint several new justices to the Court—but it could be years before those appointees change the tenor of the law. With his keen mind, authoritarian bent, and contentious rhetorical style, Scalia is a distinct and persuasive presence, and his tenure is far from over. This new book shows us the man in power: his world, his journey, and the far-reaching consequences of the transformed legal landscape.

Courting Justice

Courting Justice