Covenant and Liberation

This book springs from the practical interaction of two absorbing interests: in covenant, thanks to many years of lecturing on the Scriptures, in which covenants provide a sure road from start to finish of the Bible; and in liberation, an ...

Covenant and Liberation


The Covenant of Peace

The Covenant of Peace


Out of Egypt

Out of Egypt


The Broken Covenant

attain them, we must continue our effort to understand the nature of this covenant-making people with its deep need for newness and for liberation from oldness in religion, in politics, and in personal life, as well as the moral ...

The Broken Covenant

This Second Edition represents Bellah's summation of his views on civil religion in America. In his 1967 classic essay "Civil Rights in America," Bellah argued that the religious dimensions of American society—as distinct from its churches—has its own integrity and required "the same care in understanding that any religion." This edition includes his 1978 article "Religion and the Legitimation of the American Republic," and a new Preface.

Signposts to Freedom

In respect of its origin and its role in the faith and life of Israel and of the Christian Church, therefore, the Decalogue is the -Magna Carta of the Covenant, the title deeds of the'history of Israel's liberation.

Signposts to Freedom

In this book, Lochman presents an ethic illuminated by the Ten Commandments. In wrestling to discover the meaning of human life, both individual and social, his deepest concern has been with freedom under the law. Lochman points out that no human society, however well equipped technologically, can exist without a moral basis, without convictions that are more than mere opportunism, pragmatism, and calculated self-interest. This moral basis is provided by the Ten Commandments, the Magna Charta of freedom.Lochman discusses current problem areas of personal, sexual, and social ethics: worship of false gods, anxiety, the work ethic and the cult of success, murder, terrorism, suicide, abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, war, the new morality, and new understandings of shared life in marriage.

Liberation

Liberation


The New Islamic Century

The human slips and he strays from the Path of Allah. Human is then lost. And the Qur’an speaks of such persons thus: These are they who have bartered guidance for error: but their traffic is profitless, and they have lost true direction.

The New Islamic Century

The major issue with Islam today is illiteracy and lack of knowledge of the din. People lack understanding of the Qur’an and Allah’s message. Islam is still strong, growing stronger and vibrant. There are more Believers in the world than ever in history. Yet there are many things that have gone wrong within Islam. Muslims are blinded by blinkers of self-deception and delusion, and they cannot see the fitnah amongst their own selves. Believers in isolation and in unity need to look within themselves, in their community, and in the Ummah and take a stock, objectively, of their place with Allah and in this world. In this unity of purpose and the unity of action, Believers require self-cleansing, to enable them to observe themselves clearly, free of delusion and self-deception. Such unity of purpose and action requires a clean Nafs with taqwa of Allah and knowledge of Allah. They need to understand each word of Allah’s message and each Covenant they have made with Allah and to obey it diligently. They need to read and learn the Qur’an in their own language. Devotional reciting of the Quran should be in Arabic but for a clear understanding of Allah’s word should read be in their own language. Similarly, in personal salaat and dua they may beseech Allah in vernacular and say communal prayers in Arabic. Over a short time, each person will have mastery of Allah’s Word and understand their din, rights, and obligations. Qur’an is the din, Covenant, sharia, and the law. Twenty first century is the century of l earning, understanding and communication. Such knowledge requires understanding of Allah’s Word, the Revelations. Such understanding requires Allah’s Nur within the Believers’ heart. When the Blessed Nabi died, the era of Prophesy ended with him. There were to be no more prophets or en masse Revelations by Allah. When the blessed Nabi died, he bequeathed each Believer the Qur’an and the knowledge of Allah. With submission to Allah’s will, each Believer has Allah in the niche of his heart. Allah speaks to the Believer through each aya and through each word of the Qur’an. The Nabi was a beacon of Allah’s Nur on each Believer’s Path to Allah. The Believer speaks to Allah through the Qur’an, salaat, and dua, and Allah responds in believer’s heart and mind. This gives the Believer peace and tranquility. Submission Islam, gives Iman, and Iman promotes beautiful deeds, ihsan. Beautiful deeds bring the Believer closer to Allah. In closeness to Allah the Believer is aware of Allah’s presence and he continues to perform wholesome deeds in the Taqwa of Allah. Taqwa of Allah shines the Nur of Allah on the Believer’s Nafs, which blows away the smoke of desire and craving from the Nafs. And the Nafs shines in the likeness of a mirror with Allah’s Nur. Fitnah is rooted in cravings and greed of the human. Desire and craving for the shiny goods of this world muddies the Nafs and the human cannot see Allah’s presence within him. The human slips and he strays from the Path of Allah. Human is then lost. And the Qur’an speaks of such persons thus: These are they who have bartered guidance for error: but their traffic is profitless, and they have lost true direction. Their similitude is that of a man who kindled a f ire; when it lighted all around him, Allah took away their light and left them in utter darkness. So, they could not see. Deaf, dumb, and blind, they will not return to the path. Qur’an 2:15-18 When the people around the world see the wretched condition of Muslims today, they pose the question, ‘What is wrong with Islam? ’ And the Muslims themselves wonder why after all the sub mission, prayer and humility the Muslims continue to be mired in the dust heap of humanity? Muslims continue to be poor, ignorant, and disunited. They cannot extricate themselves from the fitnah and oppression in Palestine, Syria, Kashmir, India, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Those with the taqwa of Allah, the muttaqeen are conscious that Fitnah is rooted in the cravings of the human. Cleansing of the muttaqeen begins with the knowledge that fitnah is set in the covetousness and cravings of the Muslims; that fitnah is rooted in the body politics of Islam; fitnah is embedded in the social fabric of Islam; fitnah is implanted in the way Muslims treat their mothers, sisters, wives and daughters, fitnah has roots in the way Muslims treat other Muslims. Fitnah is in the way Muslim nations undermine and subvert each other. Fitnah is in the ongoing sectarian Shia Sunni rift.

Pseudo Philo

LAB 19:11 reiterates God's dedication to the covenant, here symbolized by Moses' staff. It is an appropriate symbol for the covenant, for Israel's liberation at the Red Sea was accomplished through it (LAB 10:5-6).

Pseudo Philo

This is a literary and theological study of the Biblical Antiquities of Pseudo-Philo--a long, well-written reinterpretation of the Hebrew Bible written by a Palestinian Jew of the first century C.E. Using the methodologies of redaction and literary criticism, Murphy provides an analysis of the whole of the Biblical Antiquities. After a chapter-by-chapter analysis, Murphy addresses several topics more generally--major characters, major themes, and the historical context of the work. Full concordances to the Latin text are provided to assist future research on Pseudo-Philo. This book will prove an important resource for students of Jewish interpretation of the Bible at the end of the Second Temple period. It also sheds light on Jewish thought of the period regarding covenant, leadership in Israel, women in Israel, relations with Gentiles, divine providence, divine retribution, eschatology, and many other subjects. Furnishing a broad interpretive context for future work on the Biblical Antiquities, this study gives students of the Bible access to an important literary and religious product of first-century Judaism.

The Judaism of Jesus

The new covenant brings liberation not only from the legalism of the Ceremonial Law but also from the perfectionism inherent in Sinai covenant Moral Law. Hence, you have here two very radically different and opposing principles; ...

The Judaism of Jesus

“We had hoped it was he [the Messiah] who would redeem Israel” (Luke 24:21) In this book, you will learn that the religion Jesus founded was not Gentile or called “Christianity.” The name “Christianity” is not found in the New Testament—a work authored by Jews who followed Jesus; that the religion of Jesus was a form of Judaism that revolved around the Hebrew concept of “B’rit Hadashah,” meaning “New Covenant.” This concept first appeared in the writings of Jeremiah, one of the great prophets of Judaism; that to achieve the full task Jews have expected of their Messiah—of redeeming Israel and completing Gentile world salvation—there have been three separate stages in the work of Jesus the Messiah: (1) the Atonement & Resurrection stage; (2) the Gentile stage (represented by two thousand years of Gentile Christianity); and (3) the Jewish (or “Jewish redemption”) stage; that with regard to the Messiah’s prophecy on Jerusalem and on the completion (or “fulfillment”) of his Gentile stage—see Luke 21:24: “Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled”—on June 7, 1967 (the day Jerusalem fell to Jews), the Messiah’s prophecy was fulfilled. Hence, with June 7, 1967 formally marking the end of the Messiah’s Gentile (or “Christian”) stage, the Messiah’s final (or Jewish) stage has already begun; that with the “times of the Gentiles (or Christianity)” over, why Christians must adjust and reorient themselves to the new Jewish era and reality that is rising; many other topics of vital relevance to our present transitional era—from Gentile-Christian to Jewish-centered times—where world history is quickly reaching a tumultuous climax...centered on the Jews, Jesus the Messiah and the Messiah’s New Covenant Judaism as the winning side of end-time history.

The Covenant in Judaism and Paul

93 Sinai is a place associating the covenant establishment with the holiness and presence of God , and hence serves ... These crossings are simultaneously symbolic events that point to the change of status , to liberation from slavery ...

The Covenant in Judaism and Paul

This study examines covenant identity and rituals suggesting that while in Palestinian Judaism several rituals affirm covenant belonging, for Paul covenant is not ritually affirmed, since baptism marks entry into Christ or the church rather than into the covenant.

The Encyclopedia of the Arab Israeli Conflict A Political Social and Military History 4 volumes

The Palestine Liberation Organization is fully confident that to achieve this sacred aim the Arab nation will meet its national ... The new covenant called for the “liberation” of Palestine, rejected the Balfour Declaration and ...

The Encyclopedia of the Arab Israeli Conflict  A Political  Social  and Military History  4 volumes

This exhaustive work offers readers at multiple levels key insights into the military, political, social, cultural, and religious origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict. • With more than 750 alphabetically organized entries covering everything from important people, places, and events to a wide range of social and cultural topics—each entry featuring cross references and suggestions for further reading • A separate documents volume offering an unprecedented collection of more than 150 essential primary sources • Over 500 images, including maps, photographs, and illustrations • A comprehensive introductory overview by retired general Anthony Zinni

Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection African Thought Critical Theory and Liberation Theology in Dialogue

... the law and the covenant. Liberation theology has a track record of being a starting point of theological relevance; it is a theology focused on the interpretation of scripture in conjunction with God's intention for mankind, ...

Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection  African Thought  Critical Theory  and Liberation Theology in Dialogue

This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection: African Thought, Critical Theory, and Liberation Theology in Dialogue" that was published in Religions

A Black Theology of Liberation

At the exodus, Yahweh appears as the Godof oppressed Israel in its liberation fromthe Egyptians.The covenant at Sinaiis the agreement between Yahweh and thispeoplethat Yahwehwould continuealiberative presence ifIsrael would defineits ...

A Black Theology of Liberation

With the publication of his two early works, Black Theology & Black Power (1969) and A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), James Cone emerged as one of the most creative and provocative theological voices in North America. These books, which offered a searing indictment of white theology and society, introduced a radical reappraisal of the Christian message for our time. Combining the visions of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone radically reappraised Christianity from the perspective of the oppressed black community in North America. Forty years later, his work retains its original power, enhanced now by reflections on the evolution of his own thinking and of black theology and on the needs of the present moment.

Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Theology

... Christ as “God become my oppressed neighbor” could be developed into what one might call “covenant Christology.” For the Exodus is a liberation process that culminates in the covenant between Yahweh and the runaway slaves of Egypt.

Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Theology

Offers a comprehensive survey and interpretation of contemporary Christian political theology in a newly revised and expanded edition This book presents the latest thinking on the topic of contemporary Christian political theology, with original and constructive essays that represent a range of opinions on various topics. With contributions from expert scholars in the field, it reflects a broad range of methodologies, ecclesial traditions, and geographic and social locations, and provides a sense of the diversity of political theologies. It also addresses the primary resources of the Christian tradition, which theologians draw on when constructing political theologies, and surveys some of the most important figures and movements in political theology. This revised and expanded edition provides the most comprehensive and accessible introduction to this lively and growing area of Christian theology. Organized into five sections, Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Theology, Second Edition addresses the many changes that have occurred over the last 15 years within the field of political theology. It features new essays that address social developments and movements, such as Anglican Social Thought, John Milbank, Anabaptist Political Theologies, African Political Theologies, Postcolonialism, Political Economy, Technology and Virtuality, and Grass-roots Movements. The book also includes a new essay on the reception of Liberation Theology. Offers essays on topics such as the Trinity, atonement, and eschatology Features contributions from leading voices in the field of political theology Includes all-new entries covering fresh developments and movements like the urgency of climate change, virtuality and the digital age, the economic crisis of 2008, the discourse of religion and violence, and new modalities of war Addresses some important social movements from a theological point of view including postmodernism, grass-roots movements, and more Provides both Islamic and Jewish responses to political theology Written for academics and students of political theology, Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Theology, 2nd Edition is an enlightening read that offers a wide range of authoritative essays from some of the most notable scholars in the field.

The Covenant Connection

The covenant of God , with its various stages , is the language provided in Scripture for speaking of historical process ... The inmost meaning of history , in this perspective , is understood through salvation and liberation .

The Covenant Connection

American, European, political, and theological histories intersect in this important new exploration of the founding of the United States. The Covenant Connection examines the way in which the Protestant Reformation and federal covenant theology, which lay at the foundation of Reformed Protestantism in its Calvinist version, played a major role in shaping the political life and ideas of the colonies of British North America and ultimately the new United States of America. Contributors to the volume look at the most critical facets of this connection over nearly three centuries, from the beginning of the Reformation in sixteenth-century Zurich to the declaration of American independence and the writing of the U.S. Constitution. Individual chapters show how federal theology led to a revival of Biblical republicanism in Reformation Europe; how it was applied and modified in countries such as Switzerland, the Netherlands, Scotland, and England; and how it was carried across the Atlantic by the early settlers of North Americamost particularly the Puritans but also other groups such as the Dutch and the Scottishto form the matrix for American constitutionalism, democratic republicanism, and federalism. As a collection, The Covenant Connection provides an irrefutable analysis of the profound biblical and Reformation influences on the founding of America.

Mark for the Nations

1 Cor 11:25) where the context deals with the making of the covenant after the liberation from Egypt. After oxen have been sacrificed, Moses dashes the blood on the people saying: “See the blood of the covenant that the Lord has made ...

Mark for the Nations

Mark for the Nations is a translation by the author of his Swedish commentary on the Gospel of Mark. It is meant both for students of theology and for pastors, as well as for lay people. Hartman reads Mark's Gospel through the eyes of an early Gentile-Christian reader. For this reason he quotes much material from the Hellenistic world in translation. To some extent this material appears here for the first time in a gospel commentary. The analysis makes use of literary criticism and text linguistics, but avoids the technical terminology. To stimulate a modern reader's understanding of the evangelist's message to his first-century audience Hartman has endeavored to translate traditional terms into slightly more common language.