Crashing Through

Now Kurson returns with another thrilling adventure–the stunning true story of one man’s heroic odyssey from blindness into sight. Mike May spent his life crashing through.

Crashing Through

In his critically acclaimed bestseller Shadow Divers, Robert Kurson explored the depths of history, friendship, and compulsion. Now Kurson returns with another thrilling adventure–the stunning true story of one man’s heroic odyssey from blindness into sight. Mike May spent his life crashing through. Blinded at age three, he defied expectations by breaking world records in downhill speed skiing, joining the CIA, and becoming a successful inventor, entrepreneur, and family man. He had never yearned for vision. Then, in 1999, a chance encounter brought startling news: a revolutionary stem cell transplant surgery could restore May’s vision. It would allow him to drive, to read, to see his children’s faces. He began to contemplate an astonishing new world: Would music still sound the same? Would sex be different? Would he recognize himself in the mirror? Would his marriage survive? Would he still be Mike May? The procedure was filled with risks, some of them deadly, others beyond May’s wildest dreams. Even if the surgery worked, history was against him. Fewer than twenty cases were known worldwide in which a person gained vision after a lifetime of blindness. Each of those people suffered desperate consequences we can scarcely imagine. There were countless reasons for May to pass on vision. He could think of only a single reason to go forward. Whatever his decision, he knew it would change his life. Beautifully written and thrillingly told, Crashing Through is a journey of suspense, daring, romance, and insight into the mysteries of vision and the brain. Robert Kurson gives us a fascinating account of one man’s choice to explore what it means to see–and to truly live.

Sundays at Eight

... feature writer and bestselling author who appeared on Q & A on June 24, 2007 to tell the story of Mike May, captured in Kurson's book, Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See (Random House).

Sundays at Eight

For the last 25 years, Sunday nights at 8pm on C-SPAN has been appointment television for many Americans. During that time, host Brian Lamb has invited people to his Capitol Hill studio for hour-long conversations about contemporary society and history. In today's soundbite culture that hour remains one of television's last vestiges of in-depth, civil conversation. First came C-SPAN's Booknotes in 1989, which by the time it ended in December 2004, was the longest-running author-interview program in American broadcast history. Many of the most notable nonfiction authors of its era were featured over the course of 800 episodes, and the conversations became a defining hour for the network and for nonfiction writers. In January 2005, C-SPAN embarked on a new chapter with the launch of Q and A. Again one hour of uninterrupted conversation but the focus was expanded to include documentary film makers, entrepreneurs, social workers, political leaders and just about anyone with a story to tell. To mark this anniversary Lamb and his team at C-SPAN have assembled Sundays at Eight, a collection of the best unpublished interviews and stories from the last 25 years. Featured in this collection are historians like David McCullough, Ron Chernow and Robert Caro, reporters including April Witt, John Burns and Michael Weisskopf, and numerous others, including Christopher Hitchens, Brit Hume and Kenneth Feinberg. In a March 2001 Booknotes interview 60 Minutes creator Don Hewitt described the show's success this way: "All you have to do is tell me a story." This collection attests to the success of that principle, which has guided Lamb for decades. And his guests have not disappointed, from the dramatic escape of a lifelong resident of a North Korean prison camp, to the heavy price paid by one successful West Virginia businessman when he won 314 million in the lottery, or the heroic stories of recovery from the most horrific injuries in modern-day warfare. Told in the series' signature conversational manner, these stories come to life again on the page. Sundays at Eight is not merely a token for fans of C-SPAN's interview programs, but a collection of significant stories that have helped us understand the world for a quarter-century.

For the Benefit of Those Who See

With his book Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See, Robert Kurson gives a detailed report of May's case. By all accounts May was, though blind, a fearless child. He ran about and played games ...

For the Benefit of Those Who See

In the tradition of Oliver Sacks's The Island of the Colorblind, Rosemary Mahoney tells the story of Braille Without Borders, the first school for the blind in Tibet, and of Sabriye Tenberken, the remarkable blind woman who founded the school. Fascinated and impressed by what she learned from the blind children of Tibet, Mahoney was moved to investigate further the cultural history of blindness. As part of her research, she spent three months teaching at Tenberken's international training center for blind adults in Kerala, India, an experience that reveals both the shocking oppression endured by the world's blind, as well as their great resilience, integrity, ingenuity, and strength. By living among the blind, Rosemary Mahoney enables us to see them in fascinating close up, revealing their particular "quality of ease that seems to broadcast a fundamental connection to the world." Having read For the Benefit of Those Who See, you will never see the world in quite the same way again. "In this intelligent and humane book, Rosemary Mahoney writes of people who are blind . . . She reports on their courage and gives voice, time and again, to their miraculous dignity." -- Andrew Solomon, author of Far From the Tree

Life Stories

The greatest challenge to his courage, however, was accepting a corneal transplant that might restore his sight. Robert Kurson tells his story in Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See.

Life Stories

Memoirs, autobiographies, and diaries represent the most personal and most intimate of genres, as well as one of the most abundant and popular. Gain new understanding and better serve your readers with this detailed genre guide to nearly 700 titles that also includes notes on more than 2,800 read-alike and other related titles. * A list of subjects and suggested "read-alikes" accompany each title * Appendixes cover awards, websites, and resources * Detailed indexes provide further points of access

A Guide to Teaching Introductory Psychology

w Mini-assignment #5 Eye witness testimony, when someone actually sees another person committing a crime, ... A natural history of the senses. ... Crashing through—A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see.

A Guide to Teaching Introductory Psychology

A Guide to Teaching Introductory Psychology focuses on the critical aspects of teaching introductory psychology to undergraduate students. It includes ideas, tips, and strategies for effectively teaching this course and provides useful answers to commonly asked questions. A concise and accessible guide to teaching introductory courses in Psychology Begins with an orienting history of the course· Evaluates current trends in teaching and offers suggestions for developing personal techniques Addresses a number of relevant issues, including how to teach difficult topics; linking course content to everyday experience; developing and using class presentations, lectures, and active learning ideas; and increasing interest in course topics Supported by a website that provides links to useful websites and handouts that instructors can use in their classes (http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/teachpsychscience/lucas/)

Coming to Our Senses

R. Kurson, Crashing Through. A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See (New York: Random House, 2007). 34. P. Sinha, “Once Blind and Now They See: Surgery in Blind Children from India Allows Them to See for the First ...

Coming to Our Senses

A neurobiologist reexamines the personal nature of perception in this groundbreaking guide to a new model for our senses. We think of perception as a passive, mechanical process, as if our eyes are cameras and our ears microphones. But as neurobiologist Susan R. Barry argues, perception is a deeply personal act. Our environments, our relationships, and our actions shape and reshape our senses throughout our lives. This idea is no more apparent than in the cases of people who gain senses as adults. Barry tells the stories of Liam McCoy, practically blind from birth, and Zohra Damji, born deaf, in the decade following surgeries that restored their senses. As Liam and Zohra learned entirely new ways of being, Barry discovered an entirely new model of the nature of perception. Coming to Our Senses is a celebration of human resilience and a powerful reminder that, before you can really understand other people, you must first recognize that their worlds are fundamentally different from your own.

Encyclopedia of Perception

Crashing through: A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see. New York: Random House. Locke, J. (1690). An essay concerning human understanding. London: Eliz. Holt for Thomas Basset. Ostrovsky, Y., Andalman, A., ...

Encyclopedia of Perception

Because of the ease with which we perceive, many people see perception as something that "just happens." However, even seemingly simple perceptual experiences involve complex underlying mechanisms, which are often hidden from our conscious experience. These mechanisms are being investigated by researchers and theorists in fields such as psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, computer science, and philosophy. A few examples of the questions posed by these investigations are, What do infants perceive? How does perception develop? What do perceptual disorders reveal about normal functioning? How can information from one sense, such as hearing, be affected by information from another sense, such as vision? How is the information from all of our senses combined to result in our perception of a coherent environment? What are some practical outcomes of basic research in perception? These are just a few of the questions this encyclopedia will consider, as it presents a comprehensive overview of the field of perception for students, researchers, and professionals in psychology, the cognitive sciences, neuroscience, and related medical disciplines such as neurology and ophthalmology.

Fixing My Gaze

See Gregory RL, Wallace J. Recovery from early blindness: A case study. In Gregory RL (ed.) ... Kurson R. Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See. New York: Random House, 2007.

Fixing My Gaze

A revelatory account of the brain's capacity for change When neuroscientist Susan Barry was fifty years old, she experienced the sense of immersion in a three dimensional world for the first time. Skyscrapers on street corners appeared to loom out toward her like the bows of giant ships. Tree branches projected upward and outward, enclosing and commanding palpable volumes of space. Leaves created intricate mosaics in 3D. Barry had been cross-eyed and stereoblind since early infancy. After half a century of perceiving her surroundings as flat and compressed, on that day she saw the city of Manhattan in stereo depth for first time in her life. As a neuroscientist, she understood just how extraordinary this transformation was, not only for herself but for the scientific understanding of the human brain. Scientists have long believed that the brain is malleable only during a "critical period" in early childhood. According to this theory, Barry's brain had organized itself when she was a baby to avoid double vision - and there was no way to rewire it as an adult. But Barry found an optometrist who prescribed a little-known program of vision therapy; after intensive training, Barry was ultimately able to accomplish what other scientists and even she herself had once considered impossible. Dubbed "Stereo Sue" by renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks, Susan Barry tells her own remarkable journey and celebrates the joyous pleasure of our senses.

Future of the Mind

For the experience of a 46-year-old man who recovered his sight after 43 years of blindness—and then struggled to regain his vision, see Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See, by Robert Kurson.

Future of the Mind

Our lives are increasingly spent online. Work, friends, games, reading - all are increasingly digital and virtual. Google Glass is next. How are these extraordinary changes affecting our brains, our minds and the way we think, talk and relate? Parents, scientists, doom-mongers and sociologists are among the many people speculating about what is going to become of us as we become increasingly absorbed by electronic media and ever more remote from our natural environment. Jack Huber is clear that what he calls 'the cyberous' is changing the whole way that our minds work. But he is also clear that we can't hope to understand the effects and implications fully without a better understanding of how the mind came to be what it is over the course of human evolution. So he takes us on a historical and biological tour of the human-mind-in-its-environment and focuses on three 'trajectories' in particular: our capacity to recognise patterns (which includes our capacity to use and understand metaphor) vision (which is much more than sight post-birth development From there he looks at how our past will influence our future, giving us a glimpse of what collaboration with cyberous environments will bring to our minds and to 'self' in the future - a glimpse of what and who we will become. In doing so, he suggests three futures of the mind: Unknowable mind Absentee mind Transcendent mind Fascinating stuff! Is the future bright? You decide.

Seeing with the Hands

Kurson, R. (2007), Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See, New York: Random House. Lebars, J. (1913), 'Epée, Charles-Michel de l'', in The Catholic Encyclopedia : An International Work of ...

Seeing with the Hands

A literary, historical and philosophical discussion of attitudes to blindness by the sighted, and what the blind 'see'Why has there been a persistent fascination by the sighted, including philosophers, poets and the public, in what the blind 'see'? Is the experience of being blind, as Descartes declared, like 'seeing with the hands'? What happens on the rare occasions when surgery allows previously blind people to see for the very first time? And how did evidence from early experimental surgery inform those philosophical debates about vision and touch? These questions and others were prompted by a question that the Irish scientist, Molyneux, asked an English philosopher, Locke, in 1688, but which was to have implications for British empiricism, French sensationism, and the beginnings of psychology that outlasted the long tail of the Enlightenment. Through an unfolding historical and philosophical narrative the book follows up responses to this question in Britain and France, and considers it as an early articulation of sensory substitution, the substitution of one sense (touch) for another (vision). This concept has influenced attitudes towards blindness, and technologies for the blind and vision impaired, to this day.Key FeaturesUnfolds the history of 'blindness' from 17th century that shades into the beginnings of psychologyQuestions the assumed centrality of vision and the eye in Enlightenment philosophy and scienceTraces the core idea of 'sensory substitution' from hypothetical speculations in the 17th century to present day technologies for the blind and vision impaired

Chilling Tales

Should this book whet your interest in his fascinating life, I recommend you to read his biography by Robert Kurson, Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and The Man Who Dared to See (Random House).

Chilling Tales

Sebastian Fitzek's unputdownable psychological thrillers offer three truly gripping reads... The Eye Collector It's the same each time. A woman's body is found with a ticking stopwatch clutched in her dead hand. A distraught father must find his child before the boy suffocates - and the killer takes his left eye. Alexander Zorbach, cop turned journalist, has exactly forty-five hours to save a little boy's life. And the countdown has started... Splinter Wracked with grief after an accident killed his wife and unborn child, all Marc Lucas wants is to wipe his memory. Until he returns home one night to find himself drawn into a nightmare world... one that could cost him his memory, his sanity and even his life. Therapy Twelve-year-old Josy one day vanishes without a trace. Anna Glass, a novelist who suffers from an unusual form of schizophrenia, may be able to uncover the truth behind Josy's disappearance. But very soon her search takes a dramatic turn as the past is dragged back into the light, with terrifying consequences.

Empathy in the Context of Philosophy

Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, tr. M. J. Gregor. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1974. ... Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure and the Man Who Dared to See. New York: Random House. Lear, Jonathan. (2008).

Empathy in the Context of Philosophy

Integrating continental and Anglo-American traditions, the author exposes empathy as the foundation of the being-with-one-another of human beings. The interpretation of empathy is applied to story telling, literature, and self psychology, rescuing empathy from the margins and revealing its role in the understanding of the other and human community.

There Plant Eyes

A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness M. Leona Godin. The Story of My Life . Edited by Roger Shattuck and Dorothy Herrmann . ... Crashing Through : A True Story of Risk , Adventure , and the Man Who Dared to See .

There Plant Eyes

From Homer to Helen Keller, from Dune to Stevie Wonder, from the invention of braille to the science of echolocation, M. Leona Godin explores the fascinating history of blindness, interweaving it with her own story of gradually losing her sight. “[A] thought-provoking mixture of criticism, memoir, and advocacy." —The New Yorker There Plant Eyes probes the ways in which blindness has shaped our ocularcentric culture, challenging deeply ingrained ideas about what it means to be “blind.” For millennia, blindness has been used to signify such things as thoughtlessness (“blind faith”), irrationality (“blind rage”), and unconsciousness (“blind evolution”). But at the same time, blind people have been othered as the recipients of special powers as compensation for lost sight (from the poetic gifts of John Milton to the heightened senses of the comic book hero Daredevil). Godin—who began losing her vision at age ten—illuminates the often-surprising history of both the condition of blindness and the myths and ideas that have grown up around it over the course of generations. She combines an analysis of blindness in art and culture (from King Lear to Star Wars) with a study of the science of blindness and key developments in accessibility (the white cane, embossed printing, digital technology) to paint a vivid personal and cultural history. A genre-defying work, There Plant Eyes reveals just how essential blindness and vision are to humanity’s understanding of itself and the world.

Last House on the Hill

Kurson, R. 2007 Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See. Random House, New York. Kus, S. 1992 Toward an Archaeology of Body and Soul. In Representations in Archaeology, edited by C.S. Peebles and ...

Last House on the Hill

Recipient of the Jo Anne Stolaroff Cotsen Prize Occupied from around 7500 BC to 5700 BC, the large Neolithic and Chalcolithic settlement of Catalhoyuk in Anatolia is composed entirely of domestic buildings; no public buildings have been identified. First excavated in the early 1960s, the site was left untouched until 1993. During the summers of 1997-2003 a team from the University of California at Berkeley (the BACH team) excavated an area at the northern end of the East Mound of Catalhoyuk. The houses there date predominantly to the late Aceramic and early Ceramic Neolithic, around 7000 BC. Last House on the Hill is the final report of the BACH excavations. This volume comprises both interpretive chapters and empirical data from the excavations and their materials. The research of the BACH team focuses on the lives and life histories of houses and people, the use of digital technologies in documenting and sharing the archaeological process, the senses of place, and the nature of cultural heritage and our public responsibilities.

Blunder

Mike May's story has been chronicled in Robert Kurson, Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See (New York: Random House, 2007). INDEX 251 NOTES.

Blunder

For anyone whose best-laid plans have been foiled by faulty thinking, Blunder reveals how understanding seven simple traps-Exposure Anxiety, Causefusion, Flat View, Cure-Allism, Infomania, Mirror Imaging, Static Cling-can make us all less apt to err in our daily lives.

ICGG 2018 Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Geometry and Graphics

363–371. SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks Cfr. Kurson, R.: Crashing through. A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see, p. 174. Random House, New York (2007) Cfr. Mazzeo, M.: Storia naturale della sinestesia.

ICGG 2018   Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Geometry and Graphics

This book gathers peer-reviewed papers presented at the 18th International Conference on Geometry and Graphics (ICGG), held in Milan, Italy, on August 3-7, 2018. The spectrum of papers ranges from theoretical research to applications, including education, in several fields of science, technology and the arts. The ICGG 2018 mainly focused on the following topics and subtopics: Theoretical Graphics and Geometry (Geometry of Curves and Surfaces, Kinematic and Descriptive Geometry, Computer Aided Geometric Design), Applied Geometry and Graphics (Modeling of Objects, Phenomena and Processes, Applications of Geometry in Engineering, Art and Architecture, Computer Animation and Games, Graphic Simulation in Urban and Territorial Studies), Engineering Computer Graphics (Computer Aided Design and Drafting, Computational Geometry, Geometric and Solid Modeling, Image Synthesis, Pattern Recognition, Digital Image Processing) and Graphics Education (Education Technology Research, Multimedia Educational Software Development, E-learning, Virtual Reality, Educational Systems, Educational Software Development Tools, MOOCs). Given its breadth of coverage, the book introduces engineers, architects and designers interested in computer applications, graphics and geometry to the latest advances in the field, with a particular focus on science, the arts and mathematics education.

Neurobionics

Kurson, R. (2007) Crashing Through: A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see. Random House, Inc., New York. Lane, F.J., Huyck, M.H, Troyk, P.R. and Schug, K. (2012) Responses of potential users to the intracortical ...

Neurobionics

Technological advances have greatly increased the potential for, and practicability of, using medical neurotechnologies to revolutionize how a wide array of neurological and nervous system diseases and dysfunctions are treated. These technologies have the potential to help reduce the impact of symptoms in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease and depression as well as help regain lost function caused by spinal cord damage or nerve damage. Medical Neurobionics is a concise overview of the biological underpinnings of neurotechnologies, the development process for these technologies, and the practical application of these advances in clinical settings. Medical Neurobionics is divided into three sections. The first section focuses specifically on providing a sound foundational understanding of the biological mechanisms that support the development of neurotechnologies. The second section looks at the efforts being carried out to develop new and exciting bioengineering advances. The book then closes with chapters that discuss practical clinical application and explore the ethical questions that surround neurobionics. A timely work that provides readers with a useful introduction to the field, Medical Neurobionics will be an essential book for neuroscientists, neuroengineers, biomedical researchers, and industry personnel.

Sensation and Perception

Crashing through: A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see. New York: Random House. Lackner, J. R., & DiZio, P. (2005). ... Expert face processing requires visual input to the right hemisphere during infancy.

Sensation and Perception

Sensation and Perception, Fifth Edition maintains the standard of clarity and coverage set in earlier editions, which make the technical scientific information accessible to a wide range of students. The authors have received national awards for their teaching and are fully responsible for the content and organization of the text. As a result, it features strong pedagogy, abundant student-friendly examples, and an engaging conversational style.

Visual Prosthetics

6. Gregory, R. L. (1997). Eye and brain: The psychology of seeing (5th ed.). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. 7. Kurson, R. (2007). Crashing through: A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see.

Visual Prosthetics

Visual Prosthetics provides an in-depth analysis of the principles of operation, current state, anticipated developments, and functional aspects of visual prosthetics restoring sight to visually impaired individuals. This volume uniquely describes the human visual system in health and disease in a pedagogical and didactic manner, fitting to professionals and researchers with a bioengineering background. Readers will find a balanced overview of electrical, molecular chemical and synthetic chromophore stimulation, in addition to the biophysics and psychological aspects of vision restoration. Unlike competitive texts, this introduction also includes the need and methods for functional evaluation and rehabilitation. Professionals in the field of biomedical engineering and graduate and postgraduate researchers will find Visual Prosthetics a valuable reference.

Sensation and Perception

Crashing through: A true story of risk, adventure, and the man who dared to see. New York: Random House. Lackner, J. R., & DiZio, P. (2005). Vestibular, proprioceptive, and haptic contributions to spatial orientation.

Sensation and Perception

Maintaining the strong pedagogy, abundant student-friendly examples, and engaging conversational style of the previous editions, the sixth edition of this introductory textbook makes technical scientific information accessible to those who are beginning to specialize in cognitive psychology. Sensation and Perception, Sixth Edition is newly available in a more affordable paperback version, making it ideal for undergraduate students. In this new edition Bates has built on Foley and Matlin’s core text to add updates focusing on multisensory integration, neural plasticity, and cognitive neuroscience, as well as real-world examples and practical applications of psychological phenomena. The sixth edition retains the clear organization of previous versions, covering a wide range of core topics, from skin senses such as touch to chemical senses such as taste and smell, to our complex visual and auditory sensory systems. This book is essential reading for undergraduates and postgraduates studying courses on sensation and perception.