The Wit of Cricket

Stories from Cricket's best-loved personalities Barry Johnston ... 2002); Blofeld, Henry: Cricket's Great Entertainers (Hodder & Stoughton, 2003); Brayshaw, Ian: The Wit of Cricket (The Currawong Press, Sydney, Australia, 1981); England ...

The Wit of Cricket

A bumper collection of the funniest anecdotes, jokes and stories from cricket's best-loved personalities. Cricket is a funny old game -- even when rain stops play! Now you can read not only the most popular stories by five of the game's all-time great characters -- Richie Benaud, Dickie Bird, Henry Blofeld, Brian Johnston and Fred Trueman - but also the humour and insights of modern players including Michael Atherton, Andrew Flintoff, Darren Gough, Kevin Pietersen and Shane Warne. Crammed full of dozens of hilarious anecdotes about legendary Test cricketers such as Ian Botham, Geoffrey Boycott, Denis Compton, Michael Holding and Merv Hughes -- plus broadcasting gaffes, sledging, short-sighted umpires and the first male streaker at Lord's!

Cricket s Greatest Rivalry

But they just don't get the idea of a fiveday draw, or indeed cricket in general. ... a confirmed amateur who drovethe ball regally; and at4the diametrically opposite Denis Compton, the great entertainer withhis range of sweep shots, ...

Cricket s Greatest Rivalry

'Hughes takes us on a breathless tour through cricket history, the great players, personalities, matches and events. He never slackens pace or dwells on the dry details of the scoreboard.' - The Times From the William Hill Award-Winning author of A Lot of Hard Yakka comes Cricket's Greatest Rivalry: A History of the Ashes in 10 Matches, a fast-paced, distinctive history of the iconic, 135-year-old cricketing rivalry between England and Australia. The new paperback edition is completely revised and updated to include the tumultuous two series of 2013-2014, which saw more more twists and turns in this enthralling contest. No other sport has a fixture like the Ashes. From the early 1880s the rivalry between these two great sporting nations has captured the public imagination and made sporting legends of its stars. Commentator, analyst and award-winning cricket historian Simon Hughes tells the story of the ten seminal series that have become the stuff of sporting folklore. Cricket's Greatest Rivalry places you right at the heart of the action of each pivotal match, explaining the social context of the time, the atmosphere of the crowd and the background and temperaments of the players that battled in both baggy green and blue caps. Simon starts his story at the very birth of the Ashes and tells the tale of the band of Australians that took on the best gentleman and players in the Empire's HQ and beat them on their home turf. That momentous occasion set the tone for some epic contests including: The thrilling 1902 Test at Old Trafford, which was one by a mere three runs. The incredible innings of Hobbs and Sutcliffe in front of a tense and packed Oval in 1926. The legendary 'bodyline' series of Jardine, Larwood, Bradman et al in 1933. The incredible run chase in 1948 that also saw Bradman's last test. England's reprise in the fifth test of 1953 when Lock, Trueman, Bailey and Hutton steered the hosts to a whirlwind victory. The fearsome pace attack from the likes of Lillie and Thompson that transformed the contest in the first Test of 1974 and shaped the Ashes as a tournament for decades to come. Botham's Ashes in 1981 that restored pride in a sports-mad nation. The match up at old Trafford where the magic of one Shane Warne sent shockwaves through the game. And finally the breaking of the Aussie stranglehold in 2005, when Flintoff, Pietersen and Vaughan did the seemingly impossible and re-established the greatest of rivalries. The book also includes complete statistics and records of all the Ashes fixtures and results and much, much more!

Buddy Holly

As with all their rock'n'roll package shows, the Crickets were fortunate in being a self-contained unit and even though there were great musicians like Sam 'The Man' Taylor and King Curtis, the orchestral sound was not right for many ...

Buddy Holly

Buddy Holly died in 1959. He was just 22 years old. Don McLean called that fatal day ‘The Day the Music Died’. But Buddy’s music hasn’t died and he left behind a wonderful legacy. With his animated voice, trademark black glasses, Fender Stratocaster and inimitable songs, Buddy and his music live on and continue to influence subsequent generations of musicians. His solitary UK tour was crucial to the British beat explosion of the early 1960s, spawning the Beatles, the Hollies and the Rolling Stones. Without Buddy Holly, today’s popular music would, almost certainly, be radically different. Spencer Leigh discusses the importance of this legendary figure through his music, his life, his image and his legacy. There are fascinating interviews with those who knew him best – his young widow Maria Elena, his band members the Crickets, Des O’Connor who compered his 1958 tour as well as musicians, songwriters, friends, fans and many others who worked with Buddy. It is inevitable that we remember the giants: Elvis, the Beatles, Freddie Mercury, David Bowie, but Buddy Holly’s death enables us also to acknowledge the less well-known musicians who died with him, 17-year-old Ritchie Valens and the outlandish Big Bopper. What emerges from Spencer’s research is an insight into Buddy’s short, impulsive life as well as an account of his continuing legacy. Packed with facts, including US and UK discographies, this book provides an invaluable wealth of information.

My Spin on Cricket

becoming one of the greatest batsmen and entertainers the cricket world has seen. My first sighting of him was in 1975– 76 in Australia when Greg Chappell was captain of the home side and Viv was only a year into Test cricket.

My Spin on Cricket

'What seeps through the pages is Benaud's passion for the game, his open-mindedness and his eye for a story. He has become a cricket institution' The Sunday Times 'His timing is magical, his phrasing simple and his choice of what and when, quite brilliant ... his heart beats upon our summer game and frequently acts as its conscience' Daily Telegraph 'It's his insight, loyalty, generosity and quick wit that has kept him at the very top' The Sun * * * * * * A Sunday Times top ten hardback bestseller, this is a hugely enjoyable celebration of the game of cricket, written by its most popular TV commentator. My Spin on Cricket tells the story of the great game through the ages, through personal anecdotes and a lively, well informed narrative by Richie Benaud, the popular cricket commentator and former Australian cricket captain. Hailed as one of the most influential cricketer and cricket personalities of the last fifty years, he was the runaway winner in The Wisden Cricketer's commentators' poll of 2005. With the emphasis on the modern game, Richie puts current events under the spotlight and relates them to the past. He discusses all aspects of the game, including gambling, sledging, leadership and technological development in this entertaining and highly informative book.

Cricket Wonderful Cricket

As I said, my mother was a great lover of cricket, while my dad [Chester Harriott, the pianist and entertainer] was in show business. We had quite a nice home and players would come and visit. And they were guaranteed a nice meal ...

Cricket  Wonderful Cricket

Remarkable cricket by remarkable people, from Rory Bremner to the Duke of Edinburgh.Boundaries, maidens, Botham and Bell; centuries, ducks, Lara and Laker...in this amazing collection of interviews, John Duncan explores the idiosyncratic, historical and entertaining game of cricket through people who share a true passion for the sport. Drawing upon various cricketing memories of some of the most respected names in British culture, busines and politics -- including Michael Parkinson, Sir Tim Rice and the Duke of Edinburgh -- and covering a variety of topics such as classic matches and personal cricketing heroes, Cricket Wonderful Cricket is an entertaining and unique insight into the eccentric and indeed wonderful game of cricket.

Cricket Odyssey

True, Constantine played cricket for a living, but he expressed his cricket in the best manner possible — without clichés. When the West Indies toured Australia, ... He called him a great character — an entertainer with not many peers.

Cricket Odyssey

Cricket Odyssey is a skilfully executed, lovingly constructed, book: a literary celebration of over a century-and-a-half of cricket. It has narrative and character study blended in a dexterously refined, yet readable form. It not only manages to pervade the essential of the essentials of some of cricket’s greatest players — from Dr W G Grace to Steve Waugh; from Sir Don Bradman, Sachin Tendulkar to Rahul Dravid; from Sir Learie Constantine and Sir Gary Sobers to Jacques Kallis; from Ray Lindwall to Wasim Akram; and, from Clarrie Grimmett to Anil Kumble and Muttiah Muralitharan — but, it also brings to life a classy and effulgent cricketing collage. More than a lively, encapsulated grandeur of individual brilliance, or cricketing chemistry, of each player epitomised in its canvas, Cricket Odyssey explores not only the many-resplendent delights of cricket, but it also delineates a deftly woven work of art — of the game’s scientific foundation, art and grammar, and its players’ phenomenal exploits, acts of courage, grandeur, and ‘shortfall.’ A journey through nostalgia, and a living monument to a living philosophy, it is, in sum, a ‘must-read’ and ‘must-keep’ book for all avid cricket fans across the globe.

Cricket Kirikiti and Imperialism in Samoa 1879 1939

“I think we will be playing every Saturday now”, wrote one of the soldiers, “so I won't miss my game of cricket ... for liquor in the German and Military Occupation days and was a great entertainer these days.4 In addition, however, ...

Cricket  Kirikiti and Imperialism in Samoa  1879   1939

This book considers how Samoans embraced and reshaped the English game of cricket, recasting it as a distinctively Samoan pastime, kirikiti. Starting with cricket’s introduction to the islands in 1879, it uses both cricket and kirikiti to trace six decades of contest between and within the categories of ‘colonisers’ and ‘colonised.’ How and why did Samoans adapt and appropriate the imperial game? How did officials, missionaries, colonists, soldiers and those with mixed foreign and Samoan heritage understand and respond to the real and symbolic challenges kirikiti presented? And how did Samoans use both games to navigate foreign colonialism(s)? By investigating these questions, Benjamin Sacks suggests alternative frameworks for conceptualising sporting transfer and adoption, and advances understandings of how power, politics and identity were manifested through sport, in Samoa and across the globe.

Men In White pb

So why do these games not use the available technology in the way that cricket does? ... Justin Langer opposed any action against them because they were great entertainers who helped bring crowds back to cricket.

Men In White  pb

'You watch, drifting, surrounded by the thing. It's like living underwater.' Men in White describes the experience of living with cricket in a country consumed by the game. Mukul Kesavan is keen on cricket in a non-playing way. With a top score of 14 in neighbourhood cricket and a lively distaste for fast bowling, his credentials for writing about the game are founded on the assumption that distance brings perspective. The book recalls the 'Pandara Park' cricket of Kesavan's childhood, examines the current health of Test cricket, the problem of chucking, the growing influence of technology on the game and, as he puts it, the wickedness of the ICC. In-between, he profiles his cricketing heroes and denounces modern cricket's villains. First published in 2007, this updated edition includes a profile of M.S. Dhoni, 'India's first adult captain since Pataudi', a celebration of the freakishly talented Muttiah Muralitharan and a chronicle of the 'Symonds Affair' which revealed more about the racism of the Indian fan than we wanted to acknowledge. Written with a novelist's talent for making things vivid and a fan's unwinking commitment to his team, Men in White is an indispensable book for cricket lovers everywhere.

A Social History of English Cricket

The mixture worked well and the crowds did not feel their local identity diminished by their imported carpetbaggers. Success was what did it, but being a great entertainer like Constantine helped, too. Not everyone liked the trend.

A Social History of English Cricket

Acclaimed as a magisterial, classic work, A Social History of English Cricket is an encyclopaedic survey of the game, from its humble origins all the way to modern floodlit finishes. But it is also the story of English culture, mirrored in a sport that has always been a complex repository of our manners, hierarchies and politics. Derek Birley’s survey of the impact on cricket of two world wars, Empire and ‘the English caste system’, will, contends Ian Wooldridge, ‘teach an intelligent child of twelve more about their heritage than he or she will ever pick up at school.’ In just under 400 pages Birley takes us through a rich historical tapestry: how the game was snatched from rustic obscurity by gentlemanly gamblers; became the height of late eighteenth century metropolitan fashion; was turned into both symbol and synonym for British imperialism; and its more recent struggle to dislodge the discomforting social values preserved in the game from its imperial heyday. Superbly witty and humorous, peopled by larger-than-life characters from Denis Compton to Ian Botham, and wholly forswearing nostalgia, A Social History of English Cricket is a tour-de-force by one of the great writers on cricket.

Out of the Park

If Hayden had told himself, “I'd try to have a mediocre tournament just to warrant myself a place in the following Test series,” we would have missed one of the all-time great entertainers in world cricket. Hayden's approach was always ...

Out of the Park

Down on his knees! Clobbered that one in typical fashion! Unleashing the slog sweep; masterclass this! Heart-in-the-mouth situation for a moment but the batsman there pulled out a trick that he had camouflaged all this while! This is gonna get done easily from this point onwards we reckon. Three in three. In comes the bowler. Play and a miss! Just did enough to literally kiss the edge. Three in two now. Running in hard…Yet another jaffa! The tide clearly in favour of the fielding side now! What a great leveller cricket is. The batsmen had it under control a couple of deliveries ago and now for the last one. Got him! The wickets are cartwheeling. That’s that. The atmosphere is electric. Crowd ecstatic! Hearts pumping and the one who held his nerve under the pressure cooker scenario came out victorious! Life’s not too different. It’s a lot like sports. You’ve got it under control on most occasions. But you never know when the tide’s pulling back. Out of the Park is a book that demonstrates the mindset of a sportsperson and encourages you to think like one through anecdotes and life lessons learned from popular cricketers, administrators, coaches and support staff alike from the world of cricket. It shows you how to be prepared to be on top of your game every single time. Because the ones around are playing to win as well. It highlights the importance of coming out of one’s comfort zone and treating winning and losing in the same breath. For staying calm under adversity helps tremendously whether in sports or in life.

And God Created Cricket

They were also notorious entertainers famous for their after-match singing and revelry, the forerunners of today's top footballers getting smashed on Cristal champagne and organizing spit roasts. You'd never know it looking at the ...

And God Created Cricket

Cricket defines Englishness like no other national pastime. From its earliest origins in the sixteenth century (or an early version played by shepherds called creag in the 1300s), through the formation of the MCC and the opening of Lord's cricket ground in 1787, to the spread of county cricket in the next century, when the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack was first published and the Ashes series was born, this simple sport of bat and ball has captured the imagination of the masses. Throughout its 500-year history, cricket has been a mirror for society as a whole, reflecting the changes that have brought us from the quintessential village green to Freddie Flintoff's pedalo, from W G Grace to Monty Panesar, via a fair number of eccentrics, heroes and downright villains. William Hill Award-winning writer Simon Hughes, no mean player himself, has lived and breathed cricket his whole life and now takes his analytical skills and typically irreverent eye to charting the history of English cricket. But this is no dry, dusty tome. It is the story of the mad characters who inhabit the game, the extraordinary lengths people will go to to watch and play it, the tale of a national obsession. It debunks the myth of cricket sportsmanship, showing the origins of sledging and match-fixing in centuries of subterfuge, corruption and violence. And it takes us beyond sport, to the heart of what it really means to be English.

On Pietersen

Nothing quite beatsthe meritocracyofTest cricket,the best playing thebestin the ultimate form of the ... a greatplayer but he was a player of great innings. He was also without doubt one of cricket's greatest entertainers. This, rather.

On Pietersen

Wherever he has gone, there seem to have been fallings out. Pietersen left South Africa to take his chance in England, he moved counties twice, and soon after becoming England captain was caught up in a dispute that led to both him and the England coach losing their jobs. In the summer of 2012, there was a row over texts sent to the opposition, and he was left out of the side, only to be 're-integrated' into the team a few months later. Finally, when England's Ashes campaign fell apart, KP was the man to take the blame when he was axed from the squad. Yet Pietersen is also England's all-time leading runscorer in international cricket, a man feared by opposition bowlers. He is a dedicated professional who trains hard, doesn't get caught up in off-the-field scrapes and works with his team-mates to help them improve their batting. Who wouldn't want him in their side? In this revealing insight into the man, award-winning writer Simon Wilde gets to the heart of the dilemma about Pietersen, a cricketer who divides opinion like no other. He seeks to understand what motivates him, why he gets caught up in controversy and helps explain why it is that England cricket fans will no longer have the opportunity to watch him do what he does best: destroy the opposition.

The Essential Wisden

Sadly the 1972 season saw the final appearance of a great Barbadian, Roy Marshall, who for nearly 20 years was, perhaps, the greatest entertainer in county cricket. At the age of 42, he was still a batsman of the highest calibre, ...

The Essential Wisden

The 150 editions of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack have contained more than 133,000 pages since the first edition was published in 1864. Over the years the Almanack – published every year without fail – has charted the highs and lows of the game, always giving its authoritative opinion on the players, the matches and the pressing issues of the day. For the first time in one volume, The Essential Wisden provides the pick of those 150 years and 133,000 pages. From the forthright Editor's Notes by the likes of Sydney H. Pardon, Hubert Preston, John Woodcock and Matthew Engel, through reports on key matches around the world, and features on the game's top players, to the renowned obituaries of people in and around the game, and a range of cricket's idiosyncratic "Unusual Occurrences†?, John Stern and Marcus Williams distil the Almanack's most significant and fascinating writing into one anthology. With the pick of a century and a half of the best cricket writing, from the leading writers on the game including John Arlott, Neville Cardus and Gideon Haigh, The Essential Wisden is a must-have for any dedicated reader of the Almanack – and indeed for any devoted follower of the history of cricket – providing a fascinating lens through which to view the changing nature of the game.

Farokh Engineer

Farokh Engineer is one of the great entertainers of cricket. Whether behind the stumps or with a bat in his hand, he commands both the attention and the enjoyment of his audience. He is the same off the field – buoyant and a bundle of ...

Farokh Engineer

The story of the Lancashire and India wicketkeeper-batsman Farokh Engineer, one of the game's great characters and entertainers.

Shane Warne s Century

CHRIS WAS ONE OF THE BEST entertainers of my time in international cricket, and with better luck on the injury front, he could have gone down as one of the all-time great all-rounders, up there with Beefy Botham, Keith Miller, ...

Shane Warne s Century

With a flamboyant approach to the game on and off the pitch, Australia's greatest bowler Shane Warne is an irresistible cricketing force. In Shane Warne's Century, he candidly profiles 100 players from every Test nation who have had the most significant impact on his cricketing life. Warne is famous for having never scoring a Test century, although he came tantalisingly close on several occasions. He now wants to set the record straight by writing about a century of cricketing stars he has encountered during his illustrious career, The famous names featured here include fellow Australian legends Allan Border, Steve Waugh, Ricky Ponting and Glenn McGrath, as well as adversaries such as Brian Lara, Sachin Tendulkar, Jonty Rhodes and Freddie Flintoff. Warne also puts together a dream Test match of those he would have loved to have played alongside versus a team of international legends. Pulling no punches and giving a fascinating insight into the game, Warne serves up highly readable anecdotes and opinions. Throughout the book, Warne covers the serious issues affecting cricket today, such as cheating and match-fixing, and assesses a large number of professional relationships he has enjoyed and endured, including those with Sri Lankan star Arjuna Ranatunga and South African captain Graeme Smith. Shane Warne's Century is a genuine page-turner by one of cricket's most popular stars and is a must-read for all cricket fans.

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

D.B.Deodhar on the ill treatment meted out to C.K.Nayudu.1 C.K.Nayudu is India's greatest cricketer. Whether it was bowling, batting, ... and he was our greatest cricketer. There has never been a greater entertainer in a cricket ground, ...

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket

Lost Histories of Indian Cricket studies the personalities and controversies that have shaped Indian cricket over the years and brings to life the intensity surrounding India's national game. It may be true that that cricket today arouses more passions in India than in any other cricket playing country in the world. Yet, when it comes to writing on the history of the game, Indians have been reticent and much of the past has been obscured and lost. Majumdar here recovers this history and restores it to its rightful place in India's rich sporting heritage.

A History of Indian Cricket

The West Indies were the great entertainers of cricket . ' Cricket , lovely cricket ' was supposed to have rescued the game from boredom and , in order to accommodate them , England had drastically changed policies .

A History of Indian Cricket


Glory Days of Cricket

... the owner of the most famous proboscis in cricket and broadcasting: “well, if this is summer, why's your nose turned so blue? ... and Johnners' great friend, the entertainer and lyricist Richard Stilgoe, took part in the programme.

Glory Days of Cricket

Broadhalfpenny Down is the Mecca of cricket. The Bat and Ball Inn across the road is pavilion to the whole cricket world. This is the home of the legendary 18th-century Hambledon Club. Every cricketer wants to visit it because they know this is where cricket began. Only it didn't.That Broadhalfpenny Down is the birthplace of cricket is one of the most well-established myths in sporting history. Yet this ground still holds a unique place in the history of the game. It is where a simple country pastime evolved into a national sport; where the crude techniques of the first players evolved into subtler skills.Between the 1750s and late 1790s, Broadhalfpenny Down staged the biggest matches and fielded the most famous team, playing 'all' England 51 times and winning on 29 occasions - often in front of 20,000 spectators.Here for the first time since 1907 is a full account of the events of more than 200 years ago. Extensively researched and compiled, and updated for this 2015 ebook edition, its author Ashley Mote played competitive club cricket for more than 50 years. He is a non-playing member of numerous cricket clubs. A former journalist, scriptwriter, and businessman, he now writes non-fiction.

One Among Many

They played cricket together for Durham against a strong Lancashire side in the 1890s, South Africa in 1901 and the West ... talented sportsmen to whom everything came easily seems to have been 'laid back' and a great entertainer.

One Among Many

The story of a typical English rugby club set in its historical context linked to the tale of the rare survival of a multi-sport Victorian complex. This will be of interest and use to local people, sports enthusiasts and serious sports historians.