Crossing Places of the Upper Thames

All of the bridges featured in this book can be walked to or visited by boat and the author has visited them all. This detailed book presents to the reader a snapshot of life as our immigrant ancestors saw it.

Crossing Places of the Upper Thames

The Thames has a long history. This illustrated guide traces the history of its crossing places, and relates their origins to local use and that of long-distance traders.

Ferries of the Upper Thames

Many of the crossings were very old, dating back even to prehistoric times and predated the church which often was situated alongside the landing place on the river bank. A small chapel would provide shelter and afforda chancetopray for ...

Ferries of the Upper Thames

Joan Tucker presents a profusely illustrated history of the Thames ferries.

Beyond the Burghal Hidage

The lost Harpsford in Egham (Sr.) seems to refer to a ford crossed by the Roman road from Staines to Silchester (S ... crossing- points, but the absence of hy-þ place-names from the upper Thames might have a more complex explanation ...

Beyond the Burghal Hidage

Beyond the Burghal Hidage takes the study of Anglo-Saxon civil defence away from traditional historical and archaeological fields, and uses a groundbreaking interdisciplinary approach to examine warfare and public responses to organised violence through their impact on the landscape.

The Historic Thames

The upper Thames is indeedshallow and narrow, and there are innumerable places above Oxford where itcould be crossed, so far as the volume of its waters was concerned. It was crossed by husbandmen wherever a village or afarm stood upon ...

The Historic Thames


The Upper Thames Country and the Severn Avon Plain

Abingdon , at the next crossing - place of the Thames below Oxford , is the outlet for the Ock valley and stands at the junction of the two rivers . The ford was replaced by a bridge in 1416 , and this added greatly to the importance of ...

The Upper Thames Country and the Severn Avon Plain


Crossing the Human Threshold

Dynamic Transformation and Persistent Places During the Middle Pleistocene Matt Pope, John McNabb, Clive Gamble. second warm event with high sea levels, perhaps MIS 9c. The upper beds at Purfleet, as is typical of Thames terrace ...

Crossing the Human Threshold

When was the human threshold crossed? What is the evidence for evolving humans and their emerging humanity? This volume explores in a global overview the archaeology of the Middle Pleistocene, 800,000 to 130,000 years ago when evidence for innovative cultural behaviour appeared. The evidence shows that the threshold was crossed slowly, by a variety of human ancestors, and was not confined to one part of the Old World. Crossing the Human Threshold examines the changing evidence during this period for the use of place, landscape and technology. It focuses on the emergence of persistent places, and associated developments in tool use, hunting strategies and the control of fire, represented across the Old World by deeply stratified cave sites. These include the most important sites for the archaeology of human origins in the Levant, South Africa, Asia and Europe, presented here as evidence for innovation in landscape-thinking during the Middle Pleistocene. The volume also examines persistence at open locales through a cutting-edge review of the archaeology of Northern France and England. Crossing the Human Threshold is for the worldwide community of students and researchers studying early hominins and human evolution. It presents new archaeological data. It frames the evidence within current debates to understand the differences and similarities between ourselves and our ancient ancestors.

The Kentish Note Book

The spot at which this crossing took place is usually supposed to be near Kingston , or Walton , and the ... Indeed , before there were locks there must have been many places on the upper Thames at which the soldiers could have walked ...

The Kentish Note Book


The Thames

RIGHT Newbridge is blessed with a pub on both sides of the river. It is one of only three crossing points on the Upper Thames in the 15 miles between Radcot and Eynsham. AFTER NEWBRIDGE, THE RIVER SWINGS TO THE NORTH in an.

The Thames

The Thames is an extraordinary river: linking London to the countryside and the sea, the Thames is the heart of the capital and its waters the lifeblood of England. Following the river is a voyage through Britain's history, as its varied path joins landmarks of the past with the urban landscape of the modern world. This stunning photographic journey offers a unique and comprehensive showcase of the Thames we know ... and the Thames we don't... Derek Pratt's photography gives readers a unique insight into the river's many facets, comparing the rural idylls with the urban landscapes, the industrial buildings with the famous views, the royal landmarks with the river used by people all along its course for daily recreation and famous events. London has so often been the beginning and the end of the Thames story, and whilst it forms a major part, this book gives an altogether more complete and unexpected view of one of the most famous, remarkable and well-loved rivers in the world. With a stylish design, beautiful photography and interesting insights, this gorgeous coffee table book will appeal to a wide range of readers. It will be the perfect gift for anyone living near, visiting or enjoying this magnificent river, with its visual variety, hidden secrets and fascinating history.

Round about the upper Thames

Here, also, is the entrance to another and more magnificent avenue, half a mile long, leading to Warneford Place, ... all who pass that way and prevent trespassers from encroaching upon the plantations or crossing through the avenue.

Round about the upper Thames


The upper Thames

By the ancient Britons it was known as Ryd-ychin, a “ford,” because it was approached by so many river crossings. The Latin race named it Bellositum and umond, both titles having reference to its pleasant and healthy position.

The upper Thames

This small book, first published 1899, describes the upper Thames from Richmond to Oxford. It was intended to serve the passengers of the steam-boats of its time as a detailed guide.

Portfolio Artistic Monographs

Their home in the wooded hills of Wytham , looking far far across the flats of the upper Thames valley , or in the ... Three tributaries have already swelled its waters between this and the upper crossing - place , and river and banks ...

Portfolio Artistic Monographs


The New Forest

Their home in the wooded hills of Wytham , looking far far across the flats of the upper Thames valley , or in the ... Three tributaries have already swelled its waters between this and the upper crossing - place , and river and banks ...

The New Forest


The Portfolio

Their home in the wooded hills of Wytham , looking far far across the flats of the upper Thames valley , or in the ... Three tributaries have already swelled its waters between this and the upper crossing - place , and river and banks ...

The Portfolio


The New Forest and the Isle of Wight

Their home in the wooded hills of Wytham , looking far far across the flats of the upper Thames valley , or in the ... Three tributaries have already swelled its waters between this and the upper crossing - place , and river and banks ...

The New Forest and the Isle of Wight


Danes in Wessex

the Thames was fordable or bridged at many points, while below that point reliable crossing-points were few in number or depended ... In the case of river-crossings, transport of the latter does not necessarily require speed or tactical ...

Danes in Wessex

There have been many studies of the Scandinavians in Britain, but this is the first collection of essays to be devoted solely to their engagement with Wessex. New work on the early Middle Ages, not least the excavations of mass graves associated with the Viking Age in Dorset and Oxford, drew attention to the gaps in our understanding of the wider impact of Scandinavians in areas of Britain not traditionally associated with them. Here, a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the problems of their study is presented. While there may not have been the same degree of impact, discernible particularly in place-names and archaeology, as in those areas of Britain which had substantial influxes of Scandinavian settlers, Wessex was a major theater of the Viking wars in the reigns of Alfred and Æthelred Unræd. Two major topics, the Viking wars and the Danish landowning elite, figure strongly in this collection but are shown not to be the sole reasons for the presence of Danes, or items associated with them, in Wessex. Multidisciplinary approaches evoke Vikings and Danes not just through the written record, but through their impact on real and imaginary landscapes and via the objects they owned or produced. The papers raise wider questions too, such as when did aggressive Vikings morph into more acceptable Danes, and what issues of identity were there for natives and incomers in a province whose founders were believed to have also come from North Sea areas, if not from parts of Denmark itself? Readers can continue for themselves aspects of these broader debates that will be stimulated by this fascinating and significant series of studies by both established scholars and new researchers.

Voyaging Down the Thames

An Intimate Account of a Voyage 200 Miles Across England, Down "the River of Liquid History"--the Thames Clyde Eddy ... The Thames in its upper reaches is a small stream which may safely be crossed at many places by men and animals and ...

Voyaging Down the Thames


The Upper Thames Valley

THE CROSSING OF THE THAMES AT GORING an We have now got four roads , the Upper and Lower Icknield Ways ... A narrow gorge , with presumably a deep and rapid stream , would be an unsuitable , even impossible place for a ford .

The Upper Thames Valley


The Making Of The British Landscape

From this same, central stretch of riverbank, the upper Thames and Cherwell opened the way to northern Britain. Both sites were route hubs and controlled crossing points on the Thames; they were crossroads in the demographic heart of ...

The Making Of The British Landscape

How much do we really know about the place we call 'home'? In this sweeping, timely book, Nicholas Crane tells the story of Britain. ***** Over the course of 12,000 years of continuous human occupation, the British landscape has been transformed form a European peninsula of glacier and tundra to an island of glittering cities and exquisite countryside. In this geographical journey through time, we discover the ancient relationship between people and place and the deep-rooted tensions between town and countryside. From tsunamis to Roman debacles, from henge to high-rise and hamlet to metropolis, this is a book about change and adaptation. As Britain lurches towards a more sustainable future, it is the story of our age. 'A geographer's love letter to the British and the land that formed them ... dramatic, lyrical and even inspiring' Sunday Times 'A magnificent, epic work by a national treasure ... A tour de force' Bel Mooney, Daily Mail

Thames

Other river-crossings for the pilgrims of medieval England are marked by the number of badges or tokens that have been found in ... There is in Cricklade a traditional place beside a small plank bridge, known as Hatchetts Ford or more ...

Thames

In this perfect companion to London: The Biography, Peter Ackroyd once again delves into the hidden byways of history, describing the river's endless allure in a journey overflowing with characters, incidents, and wry observations. Thames: The Biography meanders gloriously, rather like the river itself. In short, lively chapters Ackroyd writes about connections between the Thames and such historical figures as Julius Caesar and Henry VIII, and offers memorable portraits of the ordinary men and women who depend upon the river for their livelihoods. The Thames as a source of artistic inspiration comes brilliantly to life as Ackroyd invokes Chaucer, Shakespeare, Turner, Shelley, and other writers, poets, and painters who have been enchanted by its many moods and colors.