Crossover Cinema

Importantly, the potential of such cinema to cross over implies not simply another passing cinematic fad, ... CROSSOVER CINEMA: FROM JARGON TO JAGARAN (HINDI FOR “AWAKENING”) The aim of this anthology is not so much to be geographically ...

Crossover Cinema

Cinematic products in the twenty-first century increasingly emerge from, engage with, and are consumed in cross-cultural settings. While there have been a number of terms used to describe cinematic forms that do not bear allegiance to a single nation in terms of conceptualization, content, finance and/or viewership, this volume contends that "crossover cinema" is the most apt contemporary description for those aspects of contemporary cinema on which it focuses. This contention is provoked by an appreciation of the cross-cultural reality of our post-globalization twenty-first century world. This volume both outlines the history of usage of the term and grounds it theoretically in ways that emphasize the personal/poetic in addition to the political. Each of the three sections of the volume then considers crossover film from one of three perspectives: production, the texts themselves, and distribution and consumption.

Crossover Cinema

While there have been a number of terms used to describe cinematic forms that do not bear allegiance to a single nation in terms of conceptualization, content, finance and/or viewership, this volume contends that "crossover cinema" is the ...

Crossover Cinema

Cinematic products in the twenty-first century increasingly emerge from, engage with, and are consumed in cross-cultural settings. While there have been a number of terms used to describe cinematic forms that do not bear allegiance to a single nation in terms of conceptualization, content, finance and/or viewership, this volume contends that "crossover cinema" is the most apt contemporary description for those aspects of contemporary cinema on which it focuses. This contention is provoked by an appreciation of the cross-cultural reality of our post-globalization twenty-first century world. This volume both outlines the history of usage of the term and grounds it theoretically in ways that emphasize the personal/poetic in addition to the political. Each of the three sections of the volume then considers crossover film from one of three perspectives: production, the texts themselves, and distribution and consumption.

Hong Kong Cinema

EAST - WEST CROSSOVER In 2000 , Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger , Hidden Dragon was to be hailed as America's first major " crossover " film since it retained an all - Chinese soundtrack for its blanket U.S. release .

Hong Kong Cinema

This cross cultural study of Hong Kong cinema looks at Eastern and Western influences upon the medium and examines its development compared to film industries of mainland China and Southeast Asia. The book spans the 20th century, focusing on a number of key elements, including the changing image of women and the rise of the martial arts film.

Global Bollywood

... of popular culture, corporations both national and transnational, including Coke, Pepsi, and Intel, are increasingly warming up to the idea of infilm advertising and sponsorship and merchandising deals. “Crossover Cinema”?

Global Bollywood


Scottish Cinema Now

the inherently crossover-oriented framework of heritage cinema. Trainspotting was the clearest case of deliberate crossover marketing, promising variously as it did the (potentially incompatible) pleasures of social realism, ...

Scottish Cinema Now

Cinema from Scotland has attained an unprecedented international profile in the decade or so since Shallow Grave (1995) and Trainspotting (1996) impinged on the consciousness of audiences and critics around the world. Scottish Cinema Now is the first collection of essays to examine in depth the new films and filmmakers that have emerged from Scotland over the last ten years. With contributions from both established names and new voices in British Cinema Studies, the volume combines detailed textual analysis with discussion of industrial issues, scholarship on new movies with historical investigation of unjustly forgotten figures and film from Scotland’s cinematic past, and a focus on international as well as indigenous images of Scottishness. Responding to the ways in recent Scottish filmmaking has transformed the country’s cinematic landscape, Scottish Cinema Now reexamines established critical agendas and sets new ones for the study of Scotland’s relationship with the moving image in the twenty-first century.

Latino American Cinema

54 CROSSOVER avant-garde, marketing traditionally has played no small role in helping to shape American cinema, in general, and, specifically for present purposes, Latina and Latino cinemas. One of the bottom lines for, initially, ...

Latino American Cinema

Latino American cinema is a provocative, complex, and definitively American topic of study. This book examines key mainstream commercial films while also spotlighting often-underappreciated documentaries, avant-garde and experimental projects, independent productions, features and shorts, and more. * Nearly 300 entries on movies, actors and actresses, concepts, and trends * A resource guide and bibliography provides listings of online references and databases, research centers, and media distributors * Sidebar discussions that elaborate on key points within the entry, spotlight historical and social contexts, and offer examples

World Cinema s Dialogues With Hollywood

The search now is on for the 'Bollywood' crossover film. ... Indeed, the increasingly powerful drive by Bombay film-makers to make films that catch a crossover audience is taking film ... the place of this cinema in film history.

World Cinema s  Dialogues  With Hollywood

Paul Cooke looks at Hollywood's interaction with national and transnational cinemas, from German Expressionism to Bollywood and Chinese film. While Hollywood has had a huge impact on the medium - doing all the talking in the 'dialogue' - world cinema's economic, aesthetic and political relationship with Hollywood is of profound importance.

Stardom in Contemporary Hindi Cinema

Historically, it is also fairly common for Indian actors to appear in transnational or crossover cinema. Om Puri, Naseeruddin Shah and Shabana Azmi have all been part of independent, arthouse transnational films.2In the case of the ...

Stardom in Contemporary Hindi Cinema

In this book, film scholars, anthropologists, and critics discuss star-making in the contemporary Hindi-language film industry in India, also known as “Bollywood.” Drawing on theories of stardom, globalization, transnationalism, gender, and new media studies, the chapters explore contemporary Hindi film celebrity. With the rise of social media and India’s increased engagement in the global economy, Hindi film stars are forging their identities not just through their on-screen images and magazine and advertising appearances, but also through an array of media platforms, product endorsements, setting fashion trends, and involvement in social causes. Focusing on some of the best-known Indian stars since the late 1990s, the book discusses the multiplying avenues for forging a star identity, the strategies industry outsiders adopt to become stars, and the contradictions and conflicts that such star-making produces. It addresses questions such as: What traits of contemporary stars have contributed most to longevity and success in the industry? How has filmmaking technology and practice altered the nature of stardom? How has the manufacture of celebrity altered with the recent appearance of commodity culture in India and the rise of a hyper-connected global economy? By doing so, it describes a distinct moment in India and in the world in which stars and stardom are drawn more closely than ever into the vital events of global culture. Hindi films and their stars are part of the national and global entertainment circuits that are bigger and more competitive than ever. As such, this is a timely book creates opportunities for examining stardom in other industries and provides fruitful cross-cultural perspectives on star identities today. "Grounded in rigorous scholarship as well as a palpable love of Hindi cinema, this collection of 19 essays on a dizzying array of contemporary Hindi film stars makes for an informative, thought-provoking, illuminating, and most of all, a joyful read. Pushing boundaries of not only global Star Studies but also film theory as a whole, this de-colonised and de-colonising volume is a must read for film scholars, students and cinephiles!" Dr. Sunny Singh, Senior Lecturer - Creative Writing and English Literature, Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture & Design, London Metropolitan University “A wide-ranging overview of Hindi cinema’s filmi firmament today, focussing on its most intriguing and brightest-burning stars. The variety of approaches to stardom and celebrity by both established and upcoming scholars reveals a web of interconnecting stories and concerns that provide fascinating new insights into the workings of today's Hindi film industry, while shining fresh light on contemporary India and the world we live in.” Professor Rosie Thomas, Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), College of Design, Creative and Digital Industries, University of Westminster

Contentious Connections

These films were neither part of typical Bollywood mainstream cinema nor of so called parallel or art cinema. Except Lajja, the genre of films like Bandit Queen, Fire, Monsoon Wedding and Kamsutra may be termed as Crossover Cinema.

Contentious Connections

Combining history, cultural studies, sociology, international politics, and anthropology, this multidisciplinary volume analyzes transnational connections in India and South Asia. The articles explore how politics, gender, religious discourses, regional concepts, and public culture are being re-imagined amidst translocal connections. In theoretical terms, the volume contributes to understandings of the relationship between culture, globalization and social imagination by posing following questions: What is the nature of relationships between local worlds and global flows both historically and in contemporary South Asia? What role does the state play amidst global flows? How do power issues and local hierarchies contribute to social imaginaries? And how do translocal flows influence opportunities for individual agency? The volume introduces articles dealing with various aspects and arenas of globalization in South Asia: the economy and the media landscape in India (Derné); cinema (Kumar); global brands (Majumder); religious music and South Asian Islam (Viitamäki); foreign politics (Grekova-Stefanova); politics and gender (Roy); political uses of mobile telephony (Tenhunen); Indian diaspora (Svensson); migration in colonial India (Adapa); and the position of history in classical India (Karttunen).

Zainichi Cinema

The Crossover Film and the Dispersed Text This marked intensification of activity surrounding the Zainichi image was not just centred on re-evaluating and reclaiming old films. A crucial element was the marked shift in the production ...

Zainichi Cinema

This book examines how filmmakers, curators, and critics created a category of transnational, Korean-in-Japan (Zainichi) Cinema, focussing on the period from the 1960s onwards. An enormously diverse swathe of films have been claimed for this cinema of the Korean diaspora, ranging across major studio yakuza films and melodramas, news reels created by ethnic associations, first-person video essays, and unlikely hits that crossed over from the indie distribution circuit to have a wide impact across the media landscape. Today, Zainichi-themed works have never had a higher profile, with new works by Matsue Tetsuaki, Sai Yoichi, and Yang Yonghi frequently shown at international festivals. Zainichi Cinema argues that central to this transnational cinema is the tension between films with an authorized claim to “represent”, and ambiguous and borderline works that require an active spectator to claim them as images of the Korean diaspora.

Downtown Film and TV Culture 1975 2001

Celebrated for its subcultural pedigree, Wild Style also utilized a popular music soundtrack and a conventional love story, and thus contributed to the sense that a batch of independent crossover cinema was bridging the gap between ...

Downtown Film and TV Culture 1975 2001

Downtown Film and TV Culture 1975–2001 brings together essays by filmmakers, exhibitors, cultural critics and scholars from multiple generations of the New York Downtown scene to illuminate individual films and filmmakers and explore the creation of a Downtown Canon, the impact of AIDS on younger filmmakers, community access to cable television broadcasts, and the impact of the historic downtown scene on contemporary experimental culture. The book includes J. Hoberman’s essay ‘No Wavelength: The Parapunk Underground’, as well as historical essays by Tony Conrad and Lynne Tillman, interviews with filmmakers Bette Gordon and Beth B, and essays by Ivan Kral and Nick Zedd.

Japanese Horror Cinema and Deleuze

Athique, A.M. (2013), 'Leaping the Demographic Barrier: Theoretical Challenges for the Crossover Audience', in S. Khorana (ed.), Crossover Cinema: CrossCultural Film from Production to Reception, 107–22, Oxon: Routledge.

Japanese Horror Cinema and Deleuze

Using theories of national, transnational and world cinema, and genre theories and psychoanlaysis as the basis of its argument, Japanese Horror Cinema and Deleuze argues that these understandings of Japanese horror films can be extended in new ways through the philosophy of Deleuze. In particular, the complexities and nuances of how films like Ju-On: The Grudge (2002), Audition (1999) and Kairo (2001) (and beyond) form dynamic, transformative global networks between industries, directors and audiences can be considered. Furthermore, understandings of how key horror tropes and motifs apply to these films (and others more broadly), such as the idea of the “monstrous-feminine”, can be transformed, allowing these models to become more flexible.

Surveillance and Film

In Crossover Cinema: Cross-Cultural Film From Production to Reception, edited by Sukhmani Khorana, 51–65. New York: Routledge, 2013; Willis, “Hong Kong Cinema.” 22 Yi Sun, Personal email, 8 September, 2015. 23 Sun, Yi.

Surveillance and Film

Winner of the Surveillance Studies Network Book Award: 2017 Surveillance is a common feature of everyday life. But how are we to make sense of or understand what surveillance is, how we should feel about it, and what, if anything, can we do? Surveillance and Film is an engaging and accessible book that maps out important themes in how popular culture imagines surveillance by examining key feature films that prominently address the subject. Drawing on dozens of examples from around the world, J. Macgregor Wise analyzes films that focus on those who watch (like Rear Window, Peeping Tom, Disturbia, Gigante, and The Lives of Others), films that focus on those who are watched (like The Conversation, Caché, and Ed TV), films that feature surveillance societies (like 1984, THX 1138, V for Vendetta, The Handmaid's Tale, The Truman Show, and Minority Report), surveillance procedural films (from The Naked City, to Hong Kong's Eye in the Sky, The Infernal Affairs Trilogy, and the Overheard Trilogy of films), and films that interrogate the aesthetics of the surveillance image itself (like Sliver, Dhobi Ghat (Mumbai Diaries), Der Riese, and Look). Wise uses these films to describe key models of understanding surveillance (like Big Brother, Panopticism, or the Control Society) as well as to raise issues of voyeurism, trust, ethics, technology, visibility, identity, privacy, and control that are essential elements of today's culture of surveillance. The text features questions for further discussion as well as lists of additional films that engage these topics.

The Most Dangerous Cinema

And the film takes us inside the alien hunter's ship — his lair — with its hellish, organic-looking interior infused with a hot ... in limbo for nearly a decade and a half until revived by the Alien/Predator crossover film AVP in 2004.

The Most Dangerous Cinema

People hunting people for sport—an idea both shocking and fascinating. In 1924 Richard Connell published a short story that introduced this concept to the world, where it has remained ever since—as evidenced by the many big- and small-screen adaptations and inspirations. Since its publication, Connell’s award-winning “The Most Dangerous Game” has been continuously anthologized and studied in classrooms throughout America. Raising questions about the nature of violence and cruelty, and the ethics of hunting for sport, the thrilling story spawned a new cinematic subgenre, beginning with RKO’s 1932 production of The Most Dangerous Game, and continuing right up to today. This book examines in-depth all the cinematic adaptations of the iconic short story. Each film chapter has a synopsis, a “How Dangerous Is It?” critique, an overall analysis, a production history, and credits. Five additional chapters address direct to video, television, game shows, and almost “dangerous” productions. Photographs, extensive notes, bibliography and index are included.

Pop Empires

Crossover “assumes that there are certain audiences that are commensurate with communities and demographic populations. ... black cultural productions marginalized.1 In Crossover Cinema: Cross-Cultural Film from Production to Reception, ...

Pop Empires

At the start of the twenty-first century challenges to the global hegemony of U.S. culture are more apparent than ever. Two of the contenders vying for the hearts, minds, bandwidths, and pocketbooks of the world’s consumers of culture (principally, popular culture) are India and South Korea. “Bollywood” and “Hallyu” are increasingly competing with “Hollywood”—either replacing it or filling a void in places where it never held sway. This critical multidisciplinary anthology places the mediascapes of India (the site of Bollywood), South Korea (fountainhead of Hallyu, aka the Korean Wave), and the United States (the site of Hollywood) in comparative dialogue to explore the transnational flows of technology, capital, and labor. It asks what sorts of political and economic shifts have occurred to make India and South Korea important alternative nodes of techno-cultural production, consumption, and contestation. By adopting comparative perspectives and mobile methodologies and linking popular culture to the industries that produce it as well as the industries it supports, Pop Empires connects films, music, television serials, stardom, and fandom to nation-building, diasporic identity formation, and transnational capital and labor. Additionally, via the juxtaposition of Bollywood and Hallyu, as not only synecdoches of national affiliation but also discursive case studies, the contributors examine how popular culture intersects with race, gender, and empire in relation to the global movement of peoples, goods, and ideas.

Moralizing Cinema

... Atmospheric Change Kristi McKim Landscape and Memory in Post-Fascist Italian Film Cinema Year Zero Giuliana Minghelli Masculinity in the Contemporary Romantic Comedy Gender as Genre John Alberti Crossover Cinema Cross-cultural Film ...

Moralizing Cinema

This volume is part of the recent interest in the study of religion and popular media culture (cinema in particular), but it strongly differs from most of this work in this maturing discipline. Contrary to most other edited volumes and monographs on film and religion, Moralizing Cinema will not focus upon films (cf. the representation of biblical figures, religious themes in films, the fidelity question in movies), but rather look beyond the film text, content or aesthetics, by concentrating on the cinema-related actions, strategies and policies developed by the Catholic Church and Catholic organizations in order to influence cinema. Whereas the key role of Catholics in cinema has been well studied in the USA (cf. literature on the Legion of Decency and on the Catholic influenced Production Code Administration), the issue remains unexplored for other parts of the world. The book includes case studies on Argentina, Belgium, France, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and the USA.

Eco Trauma Cinema

... Alberti Crossover Cinema Cross-cultural Film from Production to Reception Edited by Sukhmani Khorana Spanish Cinema in the Global Context Film on Film Samuel Amago Japanese Horror Films and Their American Remakes Translating Fear, ...

Eco Trauma Cinema

Film has taken a powerful position alongside the global environmental movement, from didactic documentaries to the fantasy pleasures of commercial franchises. This book investigates in particular film’s complex role in representing ecological traumas. Eco-trauma cinema represents the harm we, as humans, inflict upon our natural surroundings, or the injuries we sustain from nature in its unforgiving iterations. The term encompasses both circumstances because these seemingly distinct instances of ecological harm are often related, and even symbiotic: the traumas we perpetuate in an ecosystem through pollution and unsustainable resource management inevitably return to harm us. Contributors to this volume engage with eco-trauma cinema in its three general forms: accounts of people who are traumatized by the natural world, narratives that represent people or social processes which traumatize the environment or its species, and stories that depict the aftermath of ecological catastrophe. The films they examine represent a central challenge of our age: to overcome our disavowal of environmental crises, to reflect on the unsavoury forces reshaping the planet's ecosystems, and to restructure the mechanisms responsible for the state of the earth.

Asian Cinema and the Use of Space

... Alberti Crossover Cinema Cross-cultural Film from Production to Reception Edited by Sukhmani Khorana Spanish Cinema in the Global Context Film on Film Samuel Amago Japanese Horror Films and Their American Remakes Translating Fear, ...

Asian Cinema and the Use of Space

Asian cinemas are connected to global networks and participate in producing international film history while at the same time influenced and engaged by spatial, cultural, social and political transformations. This interdisciplinary study forwards a productive pairing of Asian cinemas and space, where space is used as a discursive tool to understand cinemas of Asia. Concentrating on the performative potential of cinematic space in Asian films, the contributors discuss how space (re)constructs forms of identities and meanings across a range of cinematic practices. Cities, landscapes, buildings and interiors actively shape cinematic performances of such identities and their significances. The essays are structured around the spatial themes of ephemeral, imagined and contested spaces. They deal with struggles for identity, belonging, autonomy and mobility within different national and transnational contexts across East, Southeast and parts of South Asia in particular, which are complicated by micropolitics and subcultures, and by the interventions and interests of global lobbies.

A Very Old Machine

A 2003 article, well into the “Bollywood” phase of Bombay cinema, described Shah as the “pioneer of crossover cinema,” based in the United States, a Yale and UCLA Film School graduate whose student film had won second place after George ...

A Very Old Machine

Argues that Indian cinema’s deep nineteenth-century past continues to play a vital role in its twenty-first-century present. In A Very Old Machine, Sudhir Mahadevan shows how Indian cinema’s many origins in the technologies and practices of the nineteenth century continue to play a vital and broad function in its twenty-first-century present. He proposes that there has never been a singular cinema in India; rather, Indian cinema has been a multifaceted phenomenon that was (and is) understood, experienced, and present in everyday life in myriad ways. Employing methods of media archaeology, close textual analysis, archival research, and cultural theory, Mahadevan digs into the history of photography, print media, practices of piracy and showmanship, and contemporary everyday imaginations of the cinema to offer an understanding of how the cinema came to be such a dominant force of culture in India. The result is an open-ended and innovative account of Indian cinema’s “many origins.” “Sudhir Mahadevan’s A Very Old Machine is a work of great theoretical sophistication and rigorous historical scholarship. A revisionist and definitive treatment of early Indian film, the book shows how prevailing attitudes toward technology, photography, empire, commodity, and mass culture made the cinema a socially and culturally distinct form in India. Drawing on a wealth of primary research, A Very Old Machine fills many gaps. Anyone who wants to know how Indian cinema became Indian will need to consult this book.” — James Morrison, editor of Hollywood Reborn: Movie Stars of the 1970s

Violence and American Cinema

Spike Lee's controversial crossover film Do the Right Thing ( 1989 ) pitted African Americans against Italians , a racial combination with box office appeal to most ethnic communities . It was followed in the 1990s by three powerful ...

Violence and American Cinema

This latest volume in our successful AFI Film Readers series analyzes violence, examining its nature, its effects, and its cinematic and social meaning.