Human Cannibalism Volume 4

The proposed work is a study of ethnic and cultural cannibalism in North America from prehistoric times to the present day. This is the fourth volume in a series of books on human cannibalism world-wide.

Human Cannibalism Volume 4

The proposed work is a study of ethnic and cultural cannibalism in North America from prehistoric times to the present day. This is the fourth volume in a series of books on human cannibalism world-wide. The work includes source material ranging from recent scientific publications and journalism to the older narratives of missionaries, explorers, and anthropologists. An approach of comparative analysis is adopted in which many ethno-historical and scientific sources are presented for comparison. The work is not intended to be strictly academic because primary, secondary, and popular sources are used, but it is intended to be thorough, accessible, and incorporates many interesting human stories. Recent historical and archaeological information is provided to further assist substantiation or refutation of accounts of human cannibalism. This is where it is hoped that the proposed work will differ from, and improve upon what has gone before. By virtue of the ethno-historical record, most information about cannibalism has come from the early modern and modern periods. The challenge has been to find a way of discussing a cultural practice that is odious to Western sensitivities, while paradoxically exerting a lurid attraction over the popular imagination. The work is founded upon scientific controversy over the actual existence or true extent of cannibalism among humans, which really began with publication of 'The Man-Eating Myth' by anthropologist Williams Arens in 1979. Over subsequent years archaeological discoveries have appeared to at least partly refute Arens' claims that stories of man-eating in the ethno-historical record are largely nonsense or fantasy. Debate on the subject among anthropologists has not ended, and incidents of cannibalism continue to occur in some of the world's most intractable trouble-spots. The proposed work predominantly covers beliefs, mythologies, and reports of assumed or actual cannibalistic practices in ethnic groups world-wide. The approach used compares and contrasts evidence to assess the veracity of reports of cannibalism among human societies. Written and verbal ethno-historical accounts (with many quotations) are combined and compared with modern anthropological and archaeological data where this is available. Wherever possible primary sources have preferably been used. The structure of the work is mainly geographical, but there are also sections covering cannibalism in prehistory, from which some of the best evidence has emerged. Sensationalism has been deliberately avoided and no judgments are cast upon peoples reported to be man-eaters. The work simply aims to determine, as far as is possible, whether a particular group were cannibalistic, and if so, why.

Barbarism and Religion Volume 4 Barbarians Savages and Empires

For the present we are in Mosaic sacred history, and the downhill journey towards anthropophagy is less likely to ... Finding such a culture-hero in the antiquity ofAmerica would not be easy, and there were a great many societies on ...

Barbarism and Religion  Volume 4  Barbarians  Savages and Empires

'Barbarism and Religion' - Edward Gibbon's own phrase - is the title of a sequence of works by John Pocock designed to situate Gibbon, and his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, in a series of contexts in the history of eighteenth-century Europe. In the fourth volume in the sequence, first published in 2005, Pocock argues that barbarism was central to the history of western historiography, to the history of the Enlightenment, and to Edward Gibbon himself. As a concept it was deeply problematic to Enlightened historians seeking to understand their own civilised societies in the light of exposure to newly discovered civilisations which were, until then, beyond the reach of history itself.

Witchcraft and Magic in Europe Volume 4

THE LITERATURE OF WITCH CRAFT Alongside the legal prosecutions described earlier in this volume, Europe witnessed an equivalent ... explored and debated the complexities of the subject and its implications for their lives and culture.

Witchcraft and Magic in Europe  Volume 4

The fifteenth to eighteenth centuries was a period of witchcraft prosecutions throughout Europe and modern scholars have now devoted a huge amount of research to these episodes. This volume will attempt to bring this work together by summarising the history of the trials in a new way - according to the types of legal systems involved. Other topics covered will be the continued practical use made of magic, the elaboration of demonological theories about witchcraft and magic, and the further development of scientific interests in natural magic through the 'Neoplatonic' and 'Hermetic' period.Amongst the topics included here are Superstition and Belief in high and popular culture, the place of Medicine, Witchcraft survivals in art and literature, and the survival of Persecution.

Eating and Being Eaten

References Arens, W. (1979) The Man-Eating Myth: Anthropology and Anthropophagy, New York: Oxford University Press. ... Edward M. (1989) 'Of Cannibals, Tourists and Ethnographers' in Cultural Anthropology 4:438–445.

Eating and Being Eaten

This innovative book is an open invitation to a rich and copious meal of imagination, senses and desires. It argues that cannibalism is practised by all and sundry. In love or in hate, fear or fascination, purposefulness or indifference, individuals, cultures and societies are actively cannibalising and being cannibalised. The underlying message of: ‘Own up to your own cannibalism!’ is convincingly argued and richly substantiated. The book brilliantly and controversially puts cannibalism at the heart of the self-assured biomedicine, globalising consumerism and voyeuristic social media. It unveils a vast number of prejudices, blind spots and shameful othering. It calls on the reader to consider a morality and an ethics that are carefully negotiated with required sensibility and sensitivity to the fact that no one and no people have the monopoly of cannibalisation and of creative improvisation in the game of cannibalism. The productive, transformative and (re)inventive understanding of cannibalism argued in the book should bring to the fore one of the most vital aspects of what it means to be human in a dynamic world of myriad interconnections and enchantments. To nourish and cherish such a productive form of cannibalism requires not only a compassionate generosity to let in and accommodate the stranger knocking at the door, but also, and more importantly, a deliberate effort to reach in, identify, contemplate, understand, embrace and become intimate with the stranger within us, individuals and societies alike.

Eating and Being Eaten

References Arens, W. (1979) The Man-Eating Myth: Anthropology and Anthropophagy, New York: Oxford University Press. ... Edward M. (1989) 'Of Cannibals, Tourists and Ethnographers' in Cultural Anthropology 4:438–445.

Eating and Being Eaten

This innovative book is an open invitation to a rich and copious meal of imagination, senses and desires. It argues that cannibalism is practised by all and sundry. In love or in hate, fear or fascination, purposefulness or indifference, individuals, cultures and societies are actively cannibalising and being cannibalised. The underlying message of: ‘Own up to your own cannibalism!’ is convincingly argued and richly substantiated. The book brilliantly and controversially puts cannibalism at the heart of the self-assured biomedicine, globalising consumerism and voyeuristic social media. It unveils a vast number of prejudices, blind spots and shameful othering. It calls on the reader to consider a morality and an ethics that are carefully negotiated with required sensibility and sensitivity to the fact that no one and no people have the monopoly of cannibalisation and of creative improvisation in the game of cannibalism. The productive, transformative and (re)inventive understanding of cannibalism argued in the book should bring to the fore one of the most vital aspects of what it means to be human in a dynamic world of myriad interconnections and enchantments. To nourish and cherish such a productive form of cannibalism requires not only a compassionate generosity to let in and accommodate the stranger knocking at the door, but also, and more importantly, a deliberate effort to reach in, identify, contemplate, understand, embrace and become intimate with the stranger within us, individuals and societies alike.

Klezmer s Afterlife

“Immigration and Cultural Anthropophagy in Brazilian Literature.” Passages de Paris 2 (2005): ... Vol. 4, Poles and Jews: Perceptions and Misperceptions, 129—42. Oxford: Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, 1990. Baudrillard, Jean.

Klezmer s Afterlife

Author Magdalena Waligorska offers not only a documentation of the klezmer revival in two of its European headquarters (Kraków and Berlin), but also an analysis of the Jewish / non-Jewish encounter it generates.

Child s Play

Poignant, R. (1967), Oceanic Mythology, London: Paul Hamlyn. Pomponio, A, Counts, D. and Harding, T. (1994) (eds), Children of Kilibob: Creation, Cosmos and Culture in Northeast New Guinea, Pacific Studies, vol. 4.

Child s Play

This innovative book finally takes seriously the need for anthropologists to produce in-depth ethnographies of children's play. In examining the subject from a cross-cultural perspective, the author argues that our understanding of the way children transform their environment to create make-believe is enhanced by viewing their creations as oral poetry. The result is a richly detailed ‘thick description' of how pretence is socially mediated and linguistically constructed, how children make sense of their own play, how play relates to other imaginative genres in Huli life, and the relationship between play and cosmology. Informed by theoretical approaches in the anthropology of play, developmental and child psychology, philosophy and phenomenology and drawing on ethnographic data from Melanesia, the book analyzes the sources for imitation, the kinds of identities and roles emulated, and the structure of collaborative make-believe talk to reveal the complex way in which children invoke their experiences of the world and re-invent them as types of virtual reality. Particular importance is placed on how the figures of the ogre and trickster are articulated. The author demonstrates that while the concept of ‘imagination' has been the cornerstone of Western intellectual traditions from Plato to Postmodernism, models of child fantasy play have always intruded into such theorizing because of children's unique capacity to throw into relief our understanding of the relationship between representation and reality.

Maps and the Writing of Space in Early Modern England and Ireland

In his own contribution to this volume, 'Rethinking Anthropophagy', Arens repeats his conviction that 'the ever-present cannibals ... and internal cultivation of the mind, are so barbarous that they cannot be said to have any culture.

Maps and the Writing of Space in Early Modern England and Ireland

Maps make the world visible, but they also obscure, distort, idealize. This wide-ranging study traces the impact of cartography on the changing cultural meanings of space, offering a fresh analysis of the mental and material mapping of early modern England and Ireland. Combining cartographic history with critical cultural studies and literary analysis, it examines the construction of social and political space in maps, in cosmography and geography, in historical and political writing, and in the literary works of Marlowe, Shakespeare, Spenser and Drayton.

Encyclopedia of American Indian History 4 volumes

C. S. Everett See also Adena Civilization; Archaeology; Hopewell Culture; Mississippian Culture; Mound Cultures of ... William Arens' 1979 book, The Man-Eating Myth, called into question the anthropological assertion that cannibalism in ...

Encyclopedia of American Indian History  4 volumes

This new four-volume encyclopedia is the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource available on the history of Native Americans, providing a lively, authoritative survey ranging from human origins to present-day controversies. • Approximately 450 entries within four separate volumes • Approximately 110 contributors from among the foremost scholars in the fields, including Troy Johnson on self-determination movements, Richard King on sports mascots, and Jon Rehyner on recovery of Native languages • Hundreds of images, including illustrations, photographs, and maps • A series of helpful research tools rounding out the fourth volume, including an extensive chronology, topical bibliography, and a comprehensive index

Cannibal Fictions

King , " The ( Mis ) Uses of Cannibalism in Contemporary Cultural Critique , " 106-23 . ... 4. Bluford Adams ' E Pluribus Barnum does include one chapter on Barnum's racialized spectacles , but it overlooks the spectacle of the Fiji ...

Cannibal Fictions

Objects of fear and fascination, cannibals have long signified an elemental "otherness," an existence outside the bounds of normalcy. In the American imagination, the figure of the cannibal has evolved tellingly over time, as Jeff Berglund shows in this study encompassing a strikingly eclectic collection of cultural, literary, and cinematic texts. Cannibal Fictions brings together two discrete periods in U.S. history: the years between the Civil War and World War I, the high-water mark in America's imperial presence, and the post-Vietnam era, when the nation was beginning to seriously question its own global agenda. Berglund shows how P. T. Barnum, in a traveling exhibit featuring so-called "Fiji cannibals," served up an alien "other" for popular consumption, while Edgar Rice Burroughs in his Tarzan of the Apes series tapped into similar anxieties about the eruption of foreign elements into a homogeneous culture. Turning to the last decades of the twentieth century, Berglund considers how treatments of cannibalism variously perpetuated or subverted racist, sexist, and homophobic ideologies rooted in earlier times. Fannie Flagg's novel Fried Green Tomatoes invokes cannibalism to new effect, offering an explicit critique of racial, gender, and sexual politics (an element to a large extent suppressed in the movie adaptation). Recurring motifs in contemporary Native American writing suggest how Western expansion has, cannibalistically, laid the seeds of its own destruction. And James Dobson's recent efforts to link the pro-life agenda to allegations of cannibalism in China testify still further to the currency and pervasiveness of this powerful trope. By highlighting practices that preclude the many from becoming one, these representations of cannibalism, Berglund argues, call into question the comforting national narrative of e pluribus unum.

This Horrid Practice

475. 17 See N. L. Whitehead, 'Hans Staden and the Cultural Politics of Cannibalism', in Hispanic American Historical Review, vol. 80, no. 4, November 2000, p. 721. 18 K. Sinclair, A History of New Zealand, Auckland, 1988, pp. 45–6.

This Horrid Practice

'Though stronger evidence of this horrid practice prevailing among the inhabitants of this coast will scarcely be required, we have still stronger to give.' - Captain James Cook This Horrid Practice uncovers an unexplored taboo of New Zealand history - the widespread practice of cannibalism in pre-European Maori society. Until now, many historians have tried to avoid it and many Maori have considered it a subject best kept quiet about in public. Paul Moon brings together an impressive array of sources from a variety of disciplines to produce this frequently contentious but always stimulating exploration of how and why Maori ate other human beings, and why the practice shuddered to a halt just a few decades after the arrival of Europeans in New Zealand. The book includes a comprehensive survey of cannibalism practices among traditional Maori, carefully assessing the evidence and concluding it was widespread. Other chapters look at how explorers and missionaries saw the practice; the role of missionaries and Christianity in its end; and, in the final chapter, why there has been so much denial on the subject and why some academics still deny that it ever happened. This Horrid Practice promises to be one of the leading works of New Zealand history published in 2008. It is a highly original work that every New Zealand history enthusiast will want to own and read.

Psychological Knowledge and Practices in Brazilian Colonial Culture

To exemplify his judgment, he again describes in detail the anthropophagous ritual (Botero 1595, vol. 4, p. 78).3 Therefore, the similarity between Anchieta's ... They present unruly habits, among which violence, cruelty, anthropophagy.

Psychological Knowledge and Practices in Brazilian Colonial Culture

This book examines the complexities of the colonization of the territory that is now Brazil and its shaping of psychological knowledge and practice. It reveals the rich network of cultural practices that were formed through the appropriation of elements of Jesuit Catholicism and the blending with elements of the cultures of native, African and Lusitanian populations present in the territory, and how psychological concepts and practices emerged and circulated between the sixteenth and the late eighteenth centuries, long before the establishment of psychology as a modern science. The volume summarizes the research program developed by the author over 38 years of academic activity through which she contributed to expand the field of historical studies in psychology by investigating how psychological concepts and practices were produced in cultural and historical contexts different from the European and North American societies where scientific psychology developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. Psychological Knowledge and Practices in Brazilian Colonial Culture will be of interest not only to historians of psychology, but also to professional psychologists working with culturally diverse populations who seek to understand how psychological concepts and phenomena are shaped by culture. By doing so, the book intends to contribute to the development of a psychology better prepared to deal with cultural diversity in an increasingly multicultural world. “Massimi’s book will now form an important foundation of English-language scholarship about the psychological and cultural impact of colonization on subjugated peoples. She has, of course, made many such contributions in Portuguese. It is to be hoped that much of her work will be translated into English so that more scholars may benefit from the richness of her insights.” – Excerpt from the Foreword by Dr. Wade E. Pickren.

Engaging with Literature of Commitment Volume 2

16The historical question of Aboriginal cannibalism is extremely contentious. Manning Clark, in his esteemed A History of Australia (Carlton: Melbourne UP, 1962– 1987), vol. 4: 350–53, tells of Aboriginal men regularly ambushing the ...

Engaging with Literature of Commitment  Volume 2

This collection ranges far and wide, as befits the personality and accomplishments of the dedicatee, Geoffrey V. Davis, German studies and exile literature scholar, postcolonialist (if there are ‘specialties’, then Australia, Canada, India, South Africa, Black Britain), journal and book series editor.... The volume opens with essays on cultural theory and practice, proceeds to close analyses of ‘settler colony’ texts from Canada, India, Australia, and New Zealand (drama, fiction, and poetry) as well as Pacific drama and Canadian indigeneity, thence ‘homeward’ to the UK (black drama, Scottish fiction, the music of Morrissey) and to German themes (exile literature; fictions about Hitler). Because Geoff’s commitment to literature has always been ‘hands-on’, the book closes with a selection of poems and experimental prose. Writers discussed include Carmen Aguirre, Hany Abu-Assad, Beryl Bainbridge, Albert Belz, Peter Bland, Peter Carey, Lynda Chanwai–Earle, Kamala Das, Robert Drewe, Éric Emmanuel–Schmitt, Toa Fraser, Stephen Fry, Dianna Fuemana, Mavis Gallant, Alasdair Gray, Xavier Her¬bert, Janette Turner Hospital, Elizabeth Jolley, Wendy Lill, Varanasi Nagalakshmi, Arundhati Roy, Daniel Sloate, Drew Hayden Taylor, Jane Urquhart, Roy Williams, and Arnold Zweig.

Medicinal Cannibalism in Early Modern English Literature and Culture

Luke Harding,Guardian Unlimited: SpecialReport, December 4, 2003, http://www.guardian.co.uk/germany/article/0,2763 ... by Richard Hakluyt in The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation, vol.

Medicinal Cannibalism in Early Modern English Literature and Culture

The human body, traded, fragmented and ingested is at the centre of Medicinal Cannibalism in Early Modern English Literature and Culture , which explores the connections between early modern literary representations of the eaten body and the medical consumption of corpses.

Cultural Selection

Journal of Abnormal Psychology , vol . 105 , no . 3 , p . 440 . Adams , Richard N. ( 1991 ) : Social Evolution and Social Reproduction . New Literary History , vol . 22 , no . 4 , p . 857-876 . Adler , Freda ( 1983 ) : Nations Not ...

Cultural Selection

This book provides an interdisciplinary theory that challenges traditional sociology by its superior ability to explain the irrational or unplanned aspects of culture, and it reveals that our society is not as rational as we would like to believe. The reader receives a comprehensive overview of cultural selection theory, including the history of the theory and the many different schools of thought, as well as an explanation of the nuts and bolts of cultural selection and the different selection mechanisms. Furthermore, the author introduces the new paradigm-breaking cultural r/k theory - a theory which reveals causal connections between religion, politics, ethics, art, and sexual behavior; and which can explain such diverse phenomena as the fall of Rome, the advent of rock music in the late Soviet Union, and the anti-pornography movement in contemporary USA. The attraction of this theory lies in its impressive explanatory power and its usefulness for making predictions. Unlike some elaborate mathematical treatises, this book maintains a down-to-earth theory with the main focus on the explanation of real world phenomena, including religion, politics, music, art, architecture, clothing fashion, sexual behavior, sport, and play. It thereby provides a solid foundation on which to base further research in many areas of human culture, including anthropology, archaeology, political and religious history, art, social psychology, sexology, peace research and futurology.

Catalogue

Catalogue


To Master the Boundless Sea

Arens, W. The Man-Eating Myth: Anthropology and Anthropophagy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979. Army and Navy Chronicle. Vol. 4. Washington, DC: B. Homans, 1837. Baker, Anne. Heartless Immensity: Literature, Culture, ...

To Master the Boundless Sea

As the United States grew into an empire in the late nineteenth century, notions like "sea power" derived not only from fleets, bases, and decisive battles but also from a scientific effort to understand and master the ocean environment. Beginning in the early nineteenth century and concluding in the first years of the twentieth, Jason W. Smith tells the story of the rise of the U.S. Navy and the emergence of American ocean empire through its struggle to control nature. In vividly told sketches of exploration, naval officers, war, and, most significantly, the ocean environment, Smith draws together insights from environmental, maritime, military, and naval history, and the history of science and cartography, placing the U.S. Navy's scientific efforts within a broader cultural context. By recasting and deepening our understanding of the U.S. Navy and the United States at sea, Smith brings to the fore the overlooked work of naval hydrographers, surveyors, and cartographers. In the nautical chart's soundings, names, symbols, and embedded narratives, Smith recounts the largely untold story of a young nation looking to extend its power over the boundless sea.

Symmetries of Culture

Part 1 , vol . 12B ( 1-2 ) ; part 2 , vol . 12B [ 3-4 ] . ) Hargittai , Istvan , and Györgyi Lengyel . 1984. The Seven One - Dimensional SpaceGroup Symmetries in Hungarian Folk Needlework . Journal of Chemical Education 61 : 1033 .

Symmetries of Culture

This groundbreaking collaboration between an anthropologist and a mathematician constitutes both a collection of symmetrical pattern designs from many cultures and a monograph on pattern design and the classification of symmetrical patterns. Intended for art historians, anthropologists, classical archaeologists, and others interested in the study of material culture, it can also serve as a reference and inspiration for the use of symmetrical patterns in art and design. "This richly illustrated study brings to light dozens of intriguing examples of symmetrical designs, for instance, in a Zulu loincloth, a Japanese chopstick case, a New England quilt, a Tibetan 'Plaque of a Thousand Lamas,' a Hawaiian water gourd. The same pattern found in a fantastical drawing of lizards by M. C. Escher is echoed in a Fijian basket lid and an Egyptian wall mosaic." — Publishers Weekly "This extremely useful guide to classifying plane pattern designs … is extensively illustrated with carvings, textiles, baskets, tiles, and poetry, which are used as examples of various symmetry patterns." — American Anthropologist "An impressive book—both in terms of its physical appearance and its content ... will undoubtedly become the major reference on the analysis of patterns in terms of symmetry properties." — Antiquity

The Church and Cultures

See also the special issue of Missiology entitled “Papers of Annual Meetings: Vatican II Missiology,” vol. 13, no. 4, October 1985; the proceedings of the symposium of the National Catholic Evangelization Association commemorating the ...

The Church and Cultures

Why should the church be concerned about cultures? Louis J. Luzbetak began to answer this question twenty-five years ago with the publication of The Church and Cultures: An Applied Anthropology for the Religious Worker. Reprinted six times and translated into five languages, it became an undisputed classic in the field. Now, by popular demand, Luzbetak has thoroughly rewritten his work, completely updating it in light of contemporary anthropological and missiological thought and in face of current world conditions. Serving as a handbook for a culturally sensitive ministry and witness, The Church and Cultures introduces the non-anthropologist to a wealth of scientific knowledge directly relevant to pastoral work, religious education social action and liturgy - in fact, to all forms of missionary activity in the church. It focuses on a burning theological issue: that of contextualization, the process by which a local church integrates its understanding of the Gospel (text) with the local culture (context).