Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union

As such, the volume will be of interest to scholars and students engaged in the study of heritage, politics, belonging, the EU, ideas, and narratives of Europe.

Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union

Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union: The European Heritage Label provides an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which European cultural heritage is created, communicated, and governed via the new European Heritage Label scheme. Drawing on ethnographic field research conducted across ten countries at sites that have been awarded with the European Heritage Label, the authors of the book approach heritage as an entangled social, spatial, temporal, discursive, narrative, performative, and embodied process. Recognising that heritage is inherently political and used by diverse actors as a tool for re-imagining communities, identities, and borders, and for generating notions of inclusion and exclusion in Europe, the book also considers the idea of Europe itself as a narrative. Chapters tackle issues such as multilevel governance of heritage; geopolitics of border-crossings and border-making; participation and non-participation; and embodiment and affective experience of heritage. Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union advances heritage studies with an interdisciplinary approach that utilises and combines theories and conceptualizations from critical geopolitics, political studies, EU and European studies, cultural policy research, and cultural studies. As such, the volume will be of interest to scholars and students engaged in the study of heritage, politics, belonging, the EU, ideas, and narratives of Europe.

Getting Cultural Heritage to Work for Europe

The above statements are part of the findings of the Expert Group on Cultural Heritage established under the Horizon 2020 Work Programme 2014 for the Societal Challenge ‘Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw ...

Getting Cultural Heritage to Work for Europe


Culture and European Union Law

"This book explores the relationship between European Union law, culture, and identity.

Culture and European Union Law

"This book explores the relationship between European Union law, culture, and identity. Community trade and competition rules have certainly affected many mundane, though highly formative, aspects of our day-to-day lives: when we shop, what we drink, even which football matches we watch on television. But Community law is not merely a vehicle for challenging established national rules which have a cultural dimension: Article 151 of the EC Treaty, which came into force in 1993, empowers the Community to 'contribute to the flowering of the cultures of the Member States', whilst at the same time bringing the 'common cultural heritage to the fore'. This book explores some of the challenges facing the European Union in developing convincing and coherent policies in the cultural domain. These challenges stem not only from the Union's fragmented institutional structure and Member State sensitivities but also from the uncertainty which surrounds the very meaning of the term 'culture' itself. The wide-ranging contributions illustrate how cultural issues can be seen to permeate all aspects of European Union law, by focussing on areas as diverse as international trade and aid, education, sport, language use, and the mass media."--Publisher description.

Negotiating Europe

The book explores the promotion of Europeanness, which aims to arouse feelings of belonging to the European Union.

Negotiating Europe

The book explores the promotion of Europeanness, which aims to arouse feelings of belonging to the European Union. It demonstrates that the promotion of Europeanness at the EU level does not constitute an overarching identity policy that imposes a homogenous interpretation of European identity. Rather, it is a process of negotiation in which various entrepreneurs of Europeanness within and outside the EU institutions invent and communicate representations of Europe. Both the negotiation and the multilayered representations of Europe that it produces are investigated through three case studies: the academia and the historians, European heritage, and the iconography of the euro.

WeAre EuropeForCulture

WeAre#EuropeForCulture has been an initiative of the European Commission, in the scope of the activities supporting the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018.

WeAre EuropeForCulture

WeAre#EuropeForCulture has been an initiative of the European Commission, in the scope of the activities supporting the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018. "The year 2018 has a symbolic and historical importance for Europe and its cultural heritage, as it marks a number of significant events such as the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I and of the independence of several Member States as well as the 400th anniversary of the start of the Thirty Years' War. The European Year of Cultural Heritage can therefore offer opportunities to better understand the present through a richer and shared c omprehension of the past." After 2018, the priorities established and shared by many European citizens and institutions remain, together with the desire to continue and to extend what the European Year just triggered. For this reason, a new project was launched by the European Commission (DG EAC), namely WeAre#EuropeForCulture, calling for initiatives with a special focus on three priorities: encourage people-centred approaches, make cultural heritage more accessible and focus on young and elderly audiences. KU Leuven CS Digital, a research group in Cultural Studies and Digital Humanities with a focus on Digital Transformation in the GLAM sector, teamed up with PHOTOCONSORTIUM, an international non-profit organization for the promotion of photographic heritage, and Noterik BV, an SME specialized in the development of multi screen engagement tools to innovate social interaction leveraging on cultural heritage, to meet this challenge.

Culture and Human Rights The Wroclaw Commentaries

The WROCLAW COMMENTARIES address legal questions as well as political consequences related to freedom of, and access to, the arts and (old/new) media; questions of religious and language rights; the protection of minorities and other ...

Culture and Human Rights  The Wroclaw Commentaries

The WROCLAW COMMENTARIES address legal questions as well as political consequences related to freedom of, and access to, the arts and (old/new) media; questions of religious and language rights; the protection of minorities and other vulnerable groups; safeguarding cultural diversity and heritage; and further pertinent issues. Specialists from all over Europe and the world summarise and comment on core messages of legal instruments, the essence of case-law as well as prevailing and important dissenting opinions in the literature, with the aim of providing a user-friendly tool for the daily needs of decision or law-makers at different juridical, administrative and political levels as well as others working in the field of culture and human rights.

Conclusions on Cultural Heritage as a Strategic Resource for a Sustainable Europe

At the Education, youth, culture and sport council meeting in Brussels, 20 May 2014 the council adopted conclusions underlining that cultural heritage, be it tangible, intangible or digital, is a strategic resource in which modern Europe ...

Conclusions on Cultural Heritage as a Strategic Resource for a Sustainable Europe

At the Education, youth, culture and sport council meeting in Brussels, 20 May 2014 the council adopted conclusions underlining that cultural heritage, be it tangible, intangible or digital, is a strategic resource in which modern Europe should invest in order to make its social, economic and environmental development more sustainable. The conclusions call in particular for more resources to be invested in cultural heritage as a part of sustainable regional strategies developed both at national and European level.

Cultural Heritage in the European Union

'improvement of the knowledge and dissemination of the culture and history of the European peoples', 'conservation and safeguarding of cultural heritage of European significance' and various measures of cultural exchange and cooperation ...

Cultural Heritage in the European Union

This volume offers a critical inquiry into the ever-evolving notion of cultural heritage and the way it has been made accessible, governed, and protected by the institutional, operational, and legal structures of the European Union.

Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union

Cultural Heritage in the European Union. Leiden: Brill. Jarzabkowski, P., R. Bednarek, and L. Cabantous. 2015. “Conducting Global TeamBased Ethnography: Methodological Challenges and Practical Methods.” Human Relations 68 (1): 3–33.

Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union

Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union: The European Heritage Label provides an interdisciplinary examination of the ways in which European cultural heritage is created, communicated, and governed via the new European Heritage Label scheme. Drawing on ethnographic field research conducted across ten countries at sites that have been awarded with the European Heritage Label, the authors of the book approach heritage as an entangled social, spatial, temporal, discursive, narrative, performative, and embodied process. Recognising that heritage is inherently political and used by diverse actors as a tool for re-imagining communities, identities, and borders, and for generating notions of inclusion and exclusion in Europe, the book also considers the idea of Europe itself as a narrative. Chapters tackle issues such as multilevel governance of heritage; geopolitics of border-crossings and border-making; participation and non-participation; and embodiment and affective experience of heritage. Creating and Governing Cultural Heritage in the European Union advances heritage studies with an interdisciplinary approach that utilises and combines theories and conceptualizations from critical geopolitics, political studies, EU and European studies, cultural policy research, and cultural studies. As such, the volume will be of interest to scholars and students engaged in the study of heritage, politics, belonging, the EU, ideas, and narratives of Europe.

Cultural Heritage in a Changing World

The central purpose of this collection of essays is to make a creative addition to the debates surrounding the cultural heritage domain.

Cultural Heritage in a Changing World

The central purpose of this collection of essays is to make a creative addition to the debates surrounding the cultural heritage domain. In the 21st century the world faces epochal changes which affect every part of society, including the arenas in which cultural heritage is made, held, collected, curated, exhibited, or simply exists. The book is about these changes; about the decentring of culture and cultural heritage away from institutional structures towards the individual; about the questions which the advent of digital technologies is demanding that we ask and answer in relation to how we understand, collect and make available Europe’s cultural heritage. Cultural heritage has enormous potential in terms of its contribution to improving the quality of life for people, understanding the past, assisting territorial cohesion, driving economic growth, opening up employment opportunities and supporting wider developments such as improvements in education and in artistic careers. Given that spectrum of possible benefits to society, the range of studies that follow here are intended to be a resource and stimulus to help inform not just professionals in the sector but all those with an interest in cultural heritage.

The Integration of Cultural Considerations in EU Law and Policies

Drawing on a series of EC policy areas that possess a cultural component, this book offers an encompassing and in-depth analysis of the integration of cultural considerations in EC law and action, assessing the impact of Article 151(4) EC ...

The Integration of Cultural Considerations in EU Law and Policies

Drawing on a series of EC policy areas that possess a cultural component, this book offers an encompassing and in-depth analysis of the integration of cultural considerations in EC law and action, assessing the impact of Article 151(4) EC in the process.

Bridge Over Troubled Waters

What Europeans are we? What makes us Europeans? Sure, history played a crucial role in European integration.

Bridge Over Troubled Waters

What Europeans are we? What makes us Europeans? Sure, history played a crucial role in European integration. The integration process initially evolved around a strong cultural, history-centred element that was based on real and cultural memories, historical interpretations of Europe's past and, most saliently, the two World Wars and the Cold War. In some way, what makes us Europeans is our heritage of war surmounted by peace. This has been symbolically recognised by the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union in 2012. However, being European is also being able to live in diversity and engage into demanding intercultural exchanges and sustainable compromises that respect diversity, belonging to various communities or places but also enhance dialogue and understanding. The European cultural heritage is a nexus for our capacity to be and become Europeans. The European Commission's DG Research and Innovation, in cooperation with the FLASH-IT FP7 dissemination project and APRE, organised in October 2014 a successful workshop on history, cultural heritage and identities. The workshop formulated policy recommendations on how to make Europe a desire for being together rather than a burden to share and stated strongly that the participatory potential of historical heritage research, although still underestimated, should play an integrationist role in Europe and contribute to Europeanisation.

The Future of European Archaeology

As head of the Dutch Archaeological Service, Willem Willems is uniquely in touch with the movement towards greater archaeological cooperation in Europe.

The Future of European Archaeology

As head of the Dutch Archaeological Service, Willem Willems is uniquely in touch with the movement towards greater archaeological cooperation in Europe. As political borders lose their importance, archaeology is forced into the forefront of the quest for a new cultural identity to reflect both the unity and heterogenity of European society. With extensive references to European legislation and community programmes Dr Willems sets out his controversial vision of a pan-European coordinating body for archaeological research and heritage management in the 21st century. Professional archaeologists cannot afford to ignore this authoritative vision of a centrally-organised future.

Unlocking regional potentials

The report Unlocking regional potentials describes recent policy actions taken by the Nordic countries regarding natural and cultural heritage as a valuable resource in sustainable regional development.

Unlocking regional potentials

Ecosystem services in the Nordic countries entail a high potential with regard to regional growth and job creation. The report Unlocking regional potentials describes recent policy actions taken by the Nordic countries regarding natural and cultural heritage as a valuable resource in sustainable regional development. In addition, the report introduces examples of European and Nordic research and development activities concerning valuation of natural and cultural heritage. Nordic experiences underline the need to apply a broad view on regional development including the importance of natural and cultural heritage to human health, well-being, social inclusion and local identity. There is also a need to develop regional platforms for interaction between different interest groups, and to carry out further analyses of regional assets with regard to natural and cultural heritage.

Executive Summary of the Study Heritage Houses for Europe

Heritage Houses for Europe is the first Pan-European Study on family-owned heritage houses. It is assessing their added value for Europe as well as identifying innovative business models.

Executive Summary of the Study  Heritage Houses for Europe

Heritage Houses for Europe is the first Pan-European Study on family-owned heritage houses. It is assessing their added value for Europe as well as identifying innovative business models. This Executive Summary outlines the results of this key project. Through this study we gained an improved bottom-up understanding of the socio-economic contribution of those houses and how innovative models can support and help their sustainable preservation. The ultimate goal was to strengthen their position within our society, by reinforcing their skillset and capacity, while raising awareness of their value for European citizens and society as a whole. This study and executive summary formulate policy recommendations for the European Commission and other stakeholders on how they can support the sustainability of the sector in Europe. This project is an important first step and many more are required to preserve our common cultural heritage across Europe.

Art Horizons

Papers presented at the 1990 European Union Conference.

Art Horizons

Papers presented at the 1990 European Union Conference.

Determining Provenance and Eventual Return of Stolen Cultural Artifacts

The present paper investigates the German view of legal problems of determining provenance and develops an eclectic overview of concerning EU-Regulation, international treaties and US legal positions.

Determining Provenance and Eventual Return of  Stolen  Cultural Artifacts

The present paper investigates the German view of legal problems of determining provenance and develops an eclectic overview of concerning EU-Regulation, international treaties and US legal positions.

Cultural Networks in Migrating Heritage

This book highlights the strengths and benefits from new cultural networking practices but also the challenges and issues that arise, how these could be addressed and what lessons can be learnt.

Cultural Networks in Migrating Heritage

This book highlights the strengths and benefits from new cultural networking practices but also the challenges and issues that arise, how these could be addressed and what lessons can be learnt. It also sets out to answer the questions ‘how’. How can we leverage the power of cross-border cultural networks in a contested place such as Europe today? How can European cultural institutions elaborate the necessary approaches and strategies to achieve a type of cultural cooperation that is truly based on cultural practice? How can the actions of the European Commission and relevant cultural bodies in Europe be strengthened, adapted or extended to meet these goals? The book will be of interest to scholars and students in museum and cultural heritage studies, visual studies, sociology of organizations, cultural heritage management and information studies. It will also be relevant to practitioners and policymakers from museums, libraries, NGOs and cultural institutions at large.